Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Journal Article

Pandurangan Nanjan, Chinch Bose, M. Sreejith, Veni C K, Anjana M Amrita, and Anjana R P., “Synthesis, bioactivities and in-silico docking studies of azaleatin-a quercetin partial methyl ether; SAR study.”, vol. 14, 2018.[Abstract]


Azaleatin- a lesser known partially methylated flavonoid, has been synthesized efficiently through MOM protection and deprotections from quercetin. The synthesized compound and closely related partially methylated flavonoids (SAR) were subjected for the investigation of α-amylase and antioxidant activities. Among the compounds tested, azaleatin was found to be best inhibitor for α-amylase with acceptable radical scavenging activity than closely related compounds. Further, in-silico modelling studies indicated that azaleatin forms hydrogen bonds with the key amino acid residues such as Gln63, Arg195 and Asp197 of α-amylase receptor. Acarbose was used as positive control for α-amylase inhibition.

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2017

Journal Article

D. Sunilkumar, Bose, C., Shaji, S. K., Nanjan Pandurangan, Geetha B Kumar, Asoke Banerji, and Dr. Bipin G. Nair, “Coconut Shell Derived Bioactive Compound Oxyresveratrol Mediates Regulation Of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9”, International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 202 – 210, 2017.

2017

Journal Article

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Bioinspired Syntheses of Partially Methylated Flavonoids – Untapped Source of Bioactivities”, Journal of Exploratory Research in Pharmacology, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 16-20, 2017.[Abstract]


Alkylation of hydroxyl groups of flavonoids is known to increase their bioavailability, metabolic stability and also impart new bioactivities. Though partially alkylated flavonoids and related compounds occupy substantial chemical space, there is scant information on their biological activities. They are comparatively less accessible, therefore development of their general syntheses are desirable. Chalcones play key role in the biosynthesis of array of flavonoids. Taking cues from nature, bioinspired, ecofriendly syntheses of polyhydroxy- and partially alkylated flavonoids have been developed. Compared to conventional protection groups, methoxymethylation was found to be more useful for the protection of hydroxyl groups. A library of flavones, flavonols, isoflavones and biflavones has been prepared. A brief account of our ongoing effort towards syntheses of small molecules is summarized here. Biological screening of the synthesized compounds led to recognition of several hitherto unreported inhibitors of biomarkers for MMP’s, NFkB, carbonic anhydrase etc.

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2016

Journal Article

Jinchu .I, Jyothi .R, Pandurangan Nanjan, K .S.Sreelatha, Dr. Krishnashree Achuthan, and Dr. Sreekala C. O., “Anthraquinones- A probe to enhance the photovoltaic properties of DSSC”, International Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering (IJECE), vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1274-1280, 2016.[Abstract]


Natural dye sensitized solar cells are a promising class of photovoltaic cells with the capacity of generating green energy at low production cost since no expensive equipment is required in their fabrication. Photovoltaics are a precious technology in the hasty world where energy prices are goes on increasing within seconds. Researchers are focusing to facilitate for producing eco-friendly, low cost and more efficient dye sensitized solar cells. In the present work we discuss the comparative photovoltaic studies of Lawsone, a natural dye from henna plant and Alizarin, a natural dye from the root of madder for fabricating the Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The absorption spectrum of Lawsone and Alizarin is found to be shifted to the longer wavelength region after the complex formation. As a result there is a significant increase in short circuit current density and conversion efficiency. This result compares with the standard dye i.e. N719 dye.

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2016

Journal Article

A. Madhavan, Pandurangan Nanjan, K. Shetty, S., and Shanmugham, S., “A rapid and selective method for the quantification of naringenin in order to monitor naringinase activity”, International Journal of ChemTech Research, vol. 9, pp. 333-338, 2016.[Abstract]


Sodium acetate (NaOAc) can selectively ionize 7-OH of naringenin generating a bathochromic shift of 41nm in its UV absorbance. This principle is used in the described spectrophotometric method that can detect naringenin amidst naringin and prunin present in the incubation mixture of naringinase. The method could be adopted for real sample analysis as it remains unaffected by the presence of phenolics such as ascorbic acid, gallic acid, citric acid and cinnamic acid. © 2016, Sphinx Knowledge House.

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2016

Journal Article

Dr. Jyotsna Nambiar, Bose, C., Venugopal, M., Asoke Banerji, Patel, T. B., Geetha B Kumar, and Nair, B. G., “Anacardic acid inhibits gelatinases through the regulation of Spry2, MMP-14, EMMPRIN and RECK.”, Exp Cell Res, vol. 349, no. 1, pp. 139-151, 2016.[Abstract]


Earlier studies from our laboratory have identified Anacardic acid (AA) as a potent inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and 9), which are over-expressed in a wide variety of cancers (Omanakuttan et al., 2012). Disruption of the finely tuned matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activator/inhibitor balance plays a decisive role in determining the fate of the cell. The present study demonstrates for the first time, that in addition to regulating the expression as well as activity of gelatinases, AA also inhibits the expression of its endogenous activators like MMP-14 and Extracellular Matrix MetalloProteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) and induces the expression of its endogenous inhibitor, REversion-inducing Cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK). In addition to modulating gelatinases, AA also inhibits the expression of various components of the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) pathway like EGF, Protein Kinase B (Akt) and Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Furthermore, AA also activates the expression of Sprouty 2 (Spry2), a negative regulator of EGF pathway, and silencing Spry2 results in up-regulation of expression of gelatinases as well as MMP-14. The present study thus elucidates a novel mechanism of action of AA and provides a strong basis for utilizing this molecule as a template for cancer therapeutics.

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2016

Journal Article

A. Omanakuttan, Bose, C., Pandurangan, N., Kumar, G. B., Banerji, A., and Dr. Bipin G. Nair, “Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone”, Experimental Cell Research, vol. 346, no. 2, pp. 167-175, 2016.[Abstract]


The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′, 7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. © 2016

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PDF iconnitric-oxideand-erk-mediates-regulation-of-cellular-processes-by-ecdystrone-18july2016.pdf

2015

Journal Article

Pandurangan Nanjan, Dr. Jyotsna Nambiar, Dr. Bipin G. Nair, and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Synthesis and Discovery of (I-3,II-3)-Biacacetin as a Novel Non-zinc Binding Inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9”, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 23, pp. 3781 - 3787, 2015.[Abstract]


Abstract Eleven biflavones (7a–b and 9a–i) were synthesised by a simple and efficient protocol and screened for MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitory activities. Amongst them, a natural product-like analog, (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin (9h) was found to be the most potent inhibitor. Molecular docking studies suggest that unlike most of the known inhibitors, 9h inhibits MMP-2 and MMP-9 through non-zinc binding interactions.

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PDF iconsynthesis-and-discovery-of-I-3-II-3-biacacetin-as-a-novel-non-zinc-binding-inhibitor-of-mmp-2-and-mmp-9-29march2015.pdf

2014

Journal Article

Ka Amrutha, Pandurangan Nanjan, Shaji, S. Ka, Sunilkumar, Da, Subhalakshmi, Ka, Rajakrishna, Lb, and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Discovery of lesser known flavones as inhibitors of NF-κB signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells-A SAR study”, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol. 24, no. 19, pp. 4735-4742, 2014.[Abstract]


<p>Seventeen flavonoids with different substitutions were evaluated for inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in the invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. They were screened using an engineered MDA-MB-231 cell line reporting NF-κB activation. The modulation of expression of two NF-κB regulated genes involved in tumorigenesis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also analyzed in these cells. Among the compounds tested, all except gossypetin and quercetagetin inhibited the activation of NF-κB, and the expression of MMP-9 and COX-2 to different degree. Methylated flavone, chrysoeriol (luteolin-3′-methylether), was found to be the most potent inhibitor of MMP-9 and COX-2 expressions. The effect of chrysoeriol on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis was analyzed by established methods. Chrysoeriol caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M and inhibited migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. The structure-activity relations amongst the flavonoids as NF-κB signaling inhibitors was studied. The study indicates differences between the actions of various flavonoids on NF-κB activation and on the biological activities of breast cancer cells. Flavones in general, were more active than the corresponding flavonols. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p>

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2014

Journal Article

A. Khan, Manna, K., Das, D. Kr, Sinha, M., Kesh, S. Bandhu, Das, U., Dey, R. Sharma, Dr. Asoke Banerji, Dey, S., and , “Seabuckthron (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) leaf extract ameliorates the gamma radiation mediated DNA damage and hepatic alterations.”, Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 52, p. 952, 2014.[Abstract]


In vitro assessment showed that H. rhamnoides (HrLE) extract possessed free radical scavenging activities and can protect gamma (γ) radiation induced supercoiled DNA damage. For in vivo study, Swiss albino mice were administered with HrLE (30 mg/kg body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of γ radiation. HrLE significantly prevented the radiation induced genomic DNA damage indicated as a significant reduction in the comet parameters. The lipid peroxidation, liver function enzymes, expression of phosphorylated NFκB (p65) and IκBα increased whereas the endogenous antioxidants diminished upon radiation exposure compared to control. Pretreatment of HrLE extract ameliorated these changes. Based on the present results it can be concluded that H. rhamnoides possess a potential preventive element in planned and accidental nuclear exposures.

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2014

Journal Article

Pandurangan Nanjan and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “A new synthesis for acacetin, chrysoeriol, diosmetin, tricin and other hydroxylated flavones by modified baker-venkataraman transformation”, Letters in Organic Chemistry, vol. 11, pp. 225–229, 2014.[Abstract]


Baker-Venkataraman (BV) rearrangement is the method of choice for the synthesis of flavones. The major limitation of BV is that it requires extensive protections and deprotections of hydroxyl groups which make the process lengthy and cumbersome. In the present study, a three step efficient method has been developed using simple protecting groups and easily available starting materials. New syntheses for acacetin, chrysoeriol, diosmetin, tricin and other hydroxylated flavones are described. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/120227/article#sthash.yQrZK0AA.dpuf

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2014

Journal Article

S. Chittiyath Madhavan, Bose, C., Mathew, T. Perakathus, and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Indian medicinal plant, Coscinium fenestratum-A new bio source for the multifunctional bio active molecule–ecdysterone”, International Journal of Herbal Medicine, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 9-12, 2014.[Abstract]


Phytochemical investigation on Coscinium fenestratum (Gaertn.) Collebr, an important Ayurvedic plant, revealed the presence of significant amounts of ecdysterone in the stem (0.22%) and leaves (0.12%), in addition to berberine. Ecdysterone was characterized using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS). Isolation of this multi- functional bioactive compound will throw light on the chemical basis for the various pharmacological effects of Coscinium plant extract.

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2013

Journal Article

A. Khan, Manna, K., Bose, C., Sinha, M., Das, D. Kr., Kesh, S. Bandhu, Chakrabarty, A., Dr. Asoke Banerji, and Dey, S., “Gossypetin, a Naturally Occurring Hexahydroxy Flavone, Ameliorates Gamma Radiation-Mediated DNA Damage”, International Journal of Radiation Biology, vol. 89, pp. 965-975, 2013.[Abstract]


<p>AbstractPurpose: To evaluate the protective effect of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-mediated DNA damage.Materials and methods: Increasing concentrations (10–150 μM) of GTIN were incubated with supercoiled DNA 1 h prior exposure to γ-radiation in the range of 5-Gy absorbed dose from Co60 γ source. To establish the effective protective concentration of GTIN, supercoiled DNA was pre-incubated with 50 μM of GTIN for 1 h followed by exposure of 5, 10 and 20 Gy doses of γ-radiation. Moreover, 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydroxyl radical, nitric oxide (NO) scavenging, metal chelating activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of GTIN were measured and compared with standards. The flowcytometric analysis and radiation-induced genomic DNA damage by comet assay were employed to estimate the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) using isolated murine hepatocytes.Results: GTIN was able to effectively scavenge different free radicals in in vitro situations. It could significantly prevent radiation induced supercoiled and genomic DNA damage with reduced comet parameters. It also acted as a potent scavenger of the radiation induced ROS.Conclusions: GTIN ameliorated radiation-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage by its free-radical scavenging activity.</p>

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2013

Journal Article

K. Aa Thasni, Ratheeshkumar, Ta, Rojini, Ga, Sivakumar, K. Ca, Nair, R. Sa, Srinivas, Gb, Dr. Asoke Banerji, Somasundaram, Va, and Srinivas, Pa, “Structure activity relationship of plumbagin in BRCA1 related cancer cells”, Molecular Carcinogenesis, vol. 52, pp. 392-403, 2013.[Abstract]


It has been shown earlier that plumbagin, a naturally occurring naphthaquinone has specific anticancer activity in BRCA1 blocked ovarian cancer cells. Plumbagin can induce estrogen dependent cell signaling and apoptosis in BRCA1 blocked ovarian cancer cells. Being a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator and apoptosis inducing agent, plumbagin has immense potential as a promising anticancer agent. In this study we analyzed whether there would be increased anticancer activity if the positions of the functional groups on plumbagin were altered and further to analyze the detailed molecular mechanism of action of the lead molecule. Methods like MTT assay, apoptosis analysis by flow cytometry, assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential-Δψm, suppression subtractive hybridization, microarray, molecular docking and estrogen receptor-DNA binding activity by electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) were adopted for assessing the anticancer activity. Consequently we found that, plumbagin was the most potent anticancer agent when compared to structurally related compounds. The anti-cancer activities were in the order plumbagin&gt;1,4-naphthaquinone&gt;juglone&gt;lawsone&gt;menadione. Molecular docking studies showed that plumbagin could be well docked in the receptor ligand complex of TRAIL-DR5 complexes to activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Since the antiproliferative activity of plumbagin could be reduced by inhibiting ERα, we speculated that plumbagin interferes with the binding of ERα to ERE and we confirmed this by EMSA. This study clearly indicates that plumbagin can induce multiple pathways of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in BRCA1 blocked cells compared to unblocked cells. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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2012

Journal Article

A. Omanakuttan, Dr. Jyotsna Nambiar, Harris, R. M., Bose, C., Pandurangan Nanjan, Varghese, R. K., Kumar, G. B., Tainer, J. A., Dr. Asoke Banerji, J. Perry, J. P., and Dr. Bipin G. Nair, “Anacardic Acid Inhibits the Catalytic Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9”, 2012.[Abstract]


Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1′ pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50&nbsp;of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action.

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2011

Journal Article

Pandurangan Nanjan, Bose, C., and Banerji, A., “Synthesis and Antioxygenic Activities of Seabuckthorn Flavone-3-ols and Analogs”, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol. 21, pp. 5328 - 5330, 2011.[Abstract]


A practical synthesis of polyhydroxy- and regiospecifically methylated flavone-3-ols which are components of commercial ‘seabuckthorn flavone’ has been achieved by modified Algar–Flynn–Oyamada method. Antioxidant activities of seabuckthorn extracts, isolated products and a number of flavone-3-ols have been determined. Structure–activity relationships have been discussed. Amongst the compounds tested, gallic acid, which is also present in seabuckthorn, was found to be the most effective antioxidant and radioprotectant.

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2010

Journal Article

C. N. Vishnu Prasad, Anjana, T., Banerji, A., and Gopalakrishnapillai, A., “Gallic acid induces GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake activity in 3T3-L1 cells”, FEBS Letters, vol. 584, pp. 531-536, 2010.[Abstract]


GLUT4, a 12 transmembrane protein, plays a major role in insulin mediated glucose transport in muscle and adipocytes. For glucose transport, the GLUT4 protein needs to be translocated to the plasma membrane from the intracellular pool and it is possible that certain compounds may be able to enhance this process. In the present work, we have shown that gallic acid can increase GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake activity in an Akt-independent but wortmannin-sensitive manner. Further analysis suggested the role of atypical protein kinase Cζ/λ in gallic acid mediated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. © 2009 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

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2009

Journal Article

C. N. Vishnu Prasad, S. Mohan, S., Banerji, A., and Gopalakrishnapillai, A., “Kaempferitrin inhibits GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes”, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 380, pp. 39-43, 2009.[Abstract]


Insulin stimulated GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) translocation and glucose uptake in muscles and adipocytes is important for the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis in our body. In this paper, we report the identification of kaempferitrin (kaempferol 3,7-dirhamnoside), a glycosylated flavonoid, as a compound that inhibits insulin stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the absence of insulin, we observed that addition of kaempferitrin did not affect GLUT4 translocation or glucose uptake. On the other hand, kaempferitrin acted as an inhibitor of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inhibiting Akt activation. Molecular docking studies using a homology model of GLUT4 showed that kaempferitrin binds directly to GLUT4 at the glucose transportation channel, suggesting the possibility of a competition between kaempferitrin and glucose during the transport. Taken together, our data demonstrates that kaempferitrin inhibits GLUT4 mediated glucose uptake at least by two different mechanisms, one by interfering with the insulin signaling pathway and the other by a possible competition with glucose during the transport. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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2008

Journal Article

K. Abdul Aziz Thasni, Rojini, G., S Rakesh, N., Ratheeshkumar, T., Babu, M. Shankar, Srinivas, G., Banerji, A., and Srinivas, P., “Genistein induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via different molecular pathways depending on Breast Cancer Susceptibility gene-1 (BRCA1) status”, European journal of pharmacology, vol. 588, pp. 158–164, 2008.[Abstract]


It has been reported that Breast Cancer Susceptibility gene-1 & 2 (BRCA1 & 2 are potential molecular targets for chemoprevention by isoflavone genistein (4′ 5, 7-trihydroxy isoflavone), in breast and prostate cancer cells. It is also known that BRCA1 has inhibitory activity on estrogen receptor-α and genistein's action on cells is mainly through modulation of estrogen receptor activity. The action of genistein with respect to BRCA1 status in ovarian cancer cells has not been reported so far. Therefore in this study, we analyzed the action of genistein on BRCA1 antisense blocked (AS4) and unblocked (NEO) BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. We found that genistein induced comparable cytotoxic effect in both AS4 and NEO cells, but through different pathways. We found that genistein induces caspase 8 dependent apoptotic pathway in NEO cells. Genistein inhibits estrogen receptor-α and activates BARD1 in BRCA1 blocked cells and induces estrogen receptor-β and FAS in presence of BRCA1. It can be concluded that even though there is no difference in the extent of cell death or apoptosis, the molecular mechanism of action of genistein in inducing apoptosis is different in BRCA1 blocked and unblocked cells. This could partially explain the beneficial effects of genistein in both wild type and mutated BRCA1 estrogen receptor positive tumors.

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2007

Journal Article

P. Srinivas, Thasni, K. A., Nair, R. S., Rojini, G., Ratheeshkumar, T., Banerji, A., and Srinivas, G., “Targeted anticancer therapy for BRCA1 blocked estrogen receptor positive ovarian cancers”, Annals of Oncology, vol. 18, 2007.

2004

Journal Article

E. M. Elango, Asita, H., Nidhi, G., Seema, P., Banerji, A., and Kuriakose, M. A., “Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 by diallyl sulfides (DAS) in HEK 293T cells”, Journal of Applied Genetics, vol. 45, pp. 469–471, 2004.[Abstract]


Cyclooxygenase (COX) is involved in modulating inflammatory response through the synthesis of prostaglandins. The inducible isoform of the enzyme, COX-2, is overexpressed in some malignant and premalignant lesions. Several preclinical and clinical studies have reported COX-2 inhibition as an effective strategy for chemoprevention. Nonsteroidal anitinflammatory drugs (NASIDs) such as celecoxib, are the most widely investigated COX-2 inhibitors. The oil-soluble diallyl sulfides (DAS) include monosulfides (DAMS), disulfides (DADS) and trisulfides (DATS). They were found to be effective against canine and human tumors, the mechanism of which remains unresolved. We attempted a comparative evaluation of the antiproliferative effect of DAS in HEK 293T cells. The cells were treated with increasing concentrations of DAMS, DADS and DATS. There were significant differences between the IC50 values of DAMS, DADS and DATS. RT-PCR was performed and the expression of COX-2 was compared with that of b actin. DATS inhibited COX-2 gene expression significantly stronger than DAMS and DADS. The data are suggestive of antineoplastic effect of DAS, mediated by controlling COX-2 expression.

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2004

Journal Article

S. Banerjee and Banerji, A., “Novel synthetic precocenoids as inhibitors of reproduction in Dysdereus Koenigii F.(hemiptera, pyrhhocoridae)”, JOURNAL OF ECOPHYSIOLOGY AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, vol. 4, pp. 123–136, 2004.

2004

Journal Article

G. Srinivas, Annab, L. A., Gopinath, G., Banerji, A., and Srinivas, P., “Antisense blocking of BRCA1 enhances sensitivity to plumbagin but not tamoxifen in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells”, Molecular carcinogenesis, vol. 39, pp. 15–25, 2004.[Abstract]


Previous studies have shown that reduction in BRCA1 mRNA and protein can result in increased proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo conditions, suggesting that BRCA1 may normally act as a growth inhibitor in these cells. Also, there are other reports that suggest that wild-type BRCA1 protein may repress estrogen receptor (ER) function either directly or indirectly. However, response to antiestrogen drugs in BRCA1-blocked ER-positive ovarian cancer cells has not been reported, and this served as the rationale for this study. We analyzed the effect of tamoxifen, emodin, and plumbagin in BRCA1-blocked ER-positive BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. For all three drugs, BRCA1-blocked cells were more sensitive than the corresponding control cells as assessed by MTT assay; however, only plumbagin showed a statistically significant difference in mean viability (P < 0.05). All three drugs induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, and morphological changes, as observed after 6 h of drug treatment, suggesting apoptosis induction in both BRCA1-blocked and control cells. However, apoptosis induction was greater in BRCA1-blocked cells, the efficacy being in the order of plumbagin > tamoxifen > emodin. The dose of plumbagin needed to kill 50% was 5 microM in the control cells and 2.68 microM for the BRCA1-blocked cells, indicating that the latter was about twofold more sensitive to plumbagin than the wild-type cells. This throws light on the fact that plumbagin may have chemotherapeutic potential as an anticancer agent in BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer patients.

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2003

Journal Article

C. Johnson, Banerji, A., and Oommen, O. V., “A comparative study of allitin and garlic on lipid turnover in a teleost, Anabas testudineus (Bloch)”, Indian journal of experimental biology, vol. 41, pp. 242–247, 2003.[Abstract]


Both allitin and garlic have anti-lipogenic properties substantiated by the activity of three lipogenic enzymes and lipid profiles. The rise in the HDL levels and simultaneous fall in the LDL upon garlic intake is the most convincing indicator of reduced lipid concentration. However, the administration of allitin recorded a decrease in the HDL and LDL levels, but when calculated on a percentage basis, there was a marginal increase in the HDL level. On the basis of results, it can be concluded that garlic or its derivatives have hypolipidaemic effect in submammalian vertebrates also. The cholesterol lowering effect of allitin and garlic can be commercially exploited for producing fish with low cholesterol for possible human consumption.

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2003

Journal Article

S. Rele, Banerji, A., Chintalwar, G., Kumar, V., and Yadava, V., “A new conformer of 20-hydroxyecdysone from Sesuvium portulacastrum: an X-ray crystallographic study”, Natural product research, vol. 17, pp. 103–108, 2003.[Abstract]


X-ray single crystal analysis of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E, 2), an important insect moulting hormone, isolated from Sesuvium portulacastrum Linn. was found to exhibit a unique stereochemical configuration revealing it to be a different conformer (polymorph) possessing the aliphatic chain atoms in a trans configuration. Moreover, the analysis also revealed the presence of three molecules of water of crystallisation thereby restricting the freedom of the aliphatic side chain.

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2003

Journal Article

A. Pal, Pradhan, P., Banerji, A., and Singh, T. P., “Crystal structure of pimolin, C26H20O8”, Zeitschrift fur Kristallographie-New Crystal Structures, vol. 218, pp. 359–360, 2003.[Abstract]


C26H20O8, triclinic, P1 (No. 2), a = 9.002(2) Å, b = 9.140(2) Å,
c = 14.501(3) Å, = 104.90(3)°, = 95.34(3)°, = 113.83(3)°,
V = 1028.2Å3
, Z = 2, Rgt(F) = 0.074, wRref(F2
) = 0.250, T = 293 K.

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2003

Journal Article

G. P. Kalena, Pradhan, P., Puranik, V. S., and Banerji, A., “A novel intramolecular arene–alkene photocycloaddition in 2-alkenyl naphtha-4-chromanones—a short route to functionalised multicyclic systems”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 44, pp. 2011–2013, 2003.[Abstract]


On irradiation, 2-methyl-2-ethenyl naphtha-4-chromanone 1 undergoes an unusual intramolecular arene–alkene photocyclisation, followed by rearrangements to give a [5.3.1.06,1]benzotricycloundecene, 5.

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2002

Journal Article

M. A. Suresh Kumar and Banerji, A., “Growth Disruption in Opisina arenosella Walker by Plumbagin, A Naturally Occurring Insect Growth Regulator”, International Journal of Tropical Insect Science, vol. 22, pp. 321–322, 2002.[Abstract]


Plumbagin, a napthoquinone from the plant Plumbago zeylanica, delayed pupation when topically applied to newly moulted final instars of the leaf eating caterpillar Opisina arenosella Walker (Lepidoptera: Oecophoridae). Pupae from treated larvae emerged into non-viable adults and had abnormalities such as deformed wings and shrunken abdomens; they also died much before the control insects. The results suggest that plumbagin interferes with the process of development and ecdysis of the insect.

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2002

Journal Article

S. Rele, Banerji, A., and Talukdar, S., “Reductive amination of aliphatic carbonyls using low-valent titanium reagent: a convenient route to free primary amines”, Journal of Chemical Research, vol. 2002, pp. 253–254, 2002.[Abstract]


A simple procedure for reductive amination of aliphatic carbonyls, giving direct access to free primary amines using low-valent titanium (LVT) reagent has been reported.

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2001

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Magdum, S., Kalena, G. P., and Banerji, A., “Insect growth regulatory activity of naturally occurring quinones and their derivatives in Dysdercus koenigii Fabr.(Hem., Pyrrhocoridae)”, Journal of Applied Entomology, vol. 125, pp. 25–30, 2001.[Abstract]


Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone occurring in the plants belonging to Plumbago sp. is known to have insect growth disrupting activities. In the present study, a comparative evaluation of bioactivities of related naphthoquinones, juglone and menadione and benzoquinones, 2,6-dimethylbenzoquinone and 2,3,6-trimethylbenzoquinone along with 2,6-dimethylhydroquinone have been undertaken using Dysdercus koenigii. The LD50 values of the compounds showed wide variation. Although all the test compounds disrupted the normal growth at sublethal doses, 2,6-dimethylbenzoquinone and menadione showed activity at low doses.

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2001

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Kalena, G. P., Mugdam, S., and Banerji, S., “In Search of Insect growth regulator: Activity of synthetic Precocenoids and other Heterocycles in Dysdercus koenigii”, Journal of Applied Entomology, vol. 125, p. 589 , 2001.

2001

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Natural product research in the new millennium”, J. Indian Inst. Sci., vol. 81, pp. 65-74, 2001.

2001

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Prospects for green technology through natural product research”, Amruth, vol. 59, p. 25, 2001.

2001

Journal Article

S. Rele, Talukdar, S., Banerji, A., and Chattopadhyay, S., “Generation of Reactive Low-Valent Titanium Species Using Metal-Arenes as Efficient Organic Reductants for TiCl3: Applications to Organic Synthesis”, The Journal of organic chemistry, vol. 66, pp. 2990–2994, 2001.[Abstract]


A comprehensive study on the use of metal−arene systems as organic reductants for TiCl3 has resulted in an efficient method for the generation of highly reactive low-valent titanium (LVT) reagents. The activated titanium species could be prepared by refluxing a mixture of substoichiometric amounts of arenes, TiCl3, and Li/Mg in THF or DME. Among the LVT reagents screened, TiCl3−Li−naphthalene−THF (reagent I) was the best for coupling of carbonyls to olefins. The reagent could carry out the McMurry olefination of both aromatic and aliphatic substrates at a lower temperature and in a much reduced time as compared to the conventional procedures. Subtle changes in the method of preparation of the LVT reagents influenced the stereoisomeric ratio of the olefins. The reagent was also useful for the synthesis of O- and N- heterocycles and vicinal diamines via intramolecular carbonyl coupling and reductive duplication of imines, respectively.

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2000

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Resurgence of Natural Product Research-A Phoenix Act”, PROCEEDINGS-INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY PART A, vol. 66, pp. 383–392, 2000.

2000

Journal Article

G. P. Kalena, Jadhav, S. M., and Banerji, A., “DDQ/PbO2: a Novel Oxidation System for Hindered Electron Rich Benzhydrols”, Molecules, vol. 5, pp. 240–244, 2000.[Abstract]


A convenient mild protocol for oxidation of highly hindered electron rich benzhydrols using DDQ / PbO2 has been developed.

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1999

Journal Article

G. Chintalwar, Jain, A., Sipahimalani, A., Banerji, A., Sumariwalla, P., Ramakrishnan, R., and Sainis, K., “An immunologically active arabinogalactan from Tinospora cordifolia”, Phytochemistry, vol. 52, pp. 1089–1093, 1999.[Abstract]


An arabinogalactan of mean Mr 2.2×106 has been isolated from the dried stems of Tinospora cordifolia and examined by methylation analysis, partial hydrolysis and carboxyl reduction. Purified polysaccharide showed polyclonal mitogenic activity against B-cells, their proliferation did not require macrophages.

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1999

Journal Article

J. N. Dhuley, Naik, S. R., Rele, S., and Banerji, A., “Hypolipidaemic and antioxidant activity of diallyl disulphide in rats”, Pharmacy and Pharmacology Communications, vol. 5, pp. 689–696, 1999.[Abstract]


The efficacy of diallyl disulphide (DADS), a constituent of garlic oil, as a hypolipidaemic and antioxidant agent was evaluated in rats.

In normolipidaemic rats DADS, at doses ranging from 10 to 50 mg kg−1, decreased plasma triglyceride without affecting cholesterolaemia and fast-or noradrenaline-induced lipolysis. DADS proved effective in reducing fructose-induced hypertriglyceridaemia and dietary hypercholesterolaemia in rats, in the latter model DADS significantly raised both the HDL cholesterol and the HDL/VLDL + LDL cholesterol ratio. DADS proved ineffective on triton induced hyperlipidaemia.

To gain insight into the antioxidant effect of DADS, hepatic and cardiac antioxidant enzyme activity and glutathione content were studied in rats fed on a high diet and DADS. The antioxidant enzyme activity was significantly enhanced whereas glutathione content was markedly restored in rats fed on a high fat diet simultaneously with DADS.

Thus, it appears that DADS exert antioxidant protection by activating the associated antioxidant enzymes.

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1999

Journal Article

G. P. Kalena, Pradhan, P., and Banerji, A., “Stereo-and regioselectivity of intramolecular 1, 2-arene-alkene photocycloaddition in 2-alkenyl-4-chromanones”, Tetrahedron, vol. 55, pp. 3209–3218, 1999.

1999

Journal Article

S. Rele, Talukdar, S., and Banerji, A., “A facile radical induced selective removal of N-propargyl protecting groups using low valent titanium reagents”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 40, pp. 767–770, 1999.[Abstract]


Low valent titanium mediated cleavage of Npropargyl bonds offers a facile, mild, and high yielding method for the deprotection of amines under neutral conditions. The methodology could be used for the chemoselective removal of propargyl groups from amines in preference to the allyl/benzyl counterparts and can be performed chemoselectively in the presence of methoxy, methylenedioxy, and chloro functionalities.

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1998

Journal Article

P. Pradhan and Banerji, A., “Novel cyclobutane fused furochromone oligomers from the seeds of Pimpinella monoica Dalz”, Tetrahedron, vol. 54, pp. 14541–14548, 1998.[Abstract]


Novel oligomers viz. di-, tri-, tetra- and pentamers (2–5) of the furochromone visnagin (1) were isolated from the chloroform extract of the fresh mature seeds of the plant Pimpinella monoica. 1D and 2D NMR studies revealed a linear head-to-tail (2 + 2) pyran-furan fusion for the oligomers. NOE data and molecular modelling suggested that the higher oligomers with all syn geometry may have helicity.

The di-, tri-, tetra- and pentamers of visnagin (2–5) were isolated from Pimpinella monoica. NOE data and molecular modelling suggested that the higher oligomers with all syn geometry may have helicity

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1998

Journal Article

N. A. Salvi, Udupa, S. R., and Banerji, A., “Chiral Synthesis of a-phenylpyridylmethanols with Rhizopus arrhizus”, Biotechnology Letters, vol. 20, pp. 201-203, 1998.[Abstract]


The bioreduction of 2-benzoylpyridine (1a) with Rhizopus arrhizus afforded (S)-(+)-alpha-phenyl-2-pyridylmethanol (2a) in 82% enantiomeric excess (e.e.) while the asymmetric hydrolysis of its racemic acetate resulted in the antipode (R)-(-)-2a with 24% optical purity.

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1998

Journal Article

P. Pradhan and Banerji, A., “Stereochemistry of Diastereomeric Neolignans from Piper hookeri by NMR spectroscopy”, Phytochemical analysis, vol. 9, p. 71, 1998.[Abstract]


A new 8.1′ type neolignan, (8R,1′S or 8S,1′R)-4-[2-(1,3-benzodioxolo-5-yl)-1-methylethyl]-2,5-dimethoxy-1-propenyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone, hookerinone B a diastereomer of hookerinone A, and a pair of 8.3′ type diastereomeric neolignans, lancifolin C and lancifolin D, were isolated from the alchoholic extracts of the medicinal plant Piper hookeri. The absolute configurations of these neolignans and of a third diastereomeric pair, dihydroisofutoquinol A and dihydroisofutoquinol B, were established by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic methods. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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1998

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Possibilities of Radiation Protection with Natural Products”, BARC NewsLetter, vol. 177, p. 55, 1998.

1998

Journal Article

S. Talukdar, Nayak, S. K., and Banerji, A., “Low-Valent Titanium Mediated Reductive Cleavage of Benzylidene Acetals: A Modified Mcmurry Reaction”, Synthetic communications, vol. 28, pp. 2325–2335, 1998.[Abstract]


Reductive cleavage ofbenzylidene acetals using a modified low-valent titanium species results in thestereoselective formation of (E)-stilbenes [cf. (III), (VI)] and arylalkanes (II).Aliphatic acetals such as (Vb) remain unaffected under similar conditions.Hence, this reaction offers an indirect protocol for the stereoselective synthesisof stilbenes in a modified McMurry pathway.

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1998

Journal Article

S. Talukdar and Banerji, A., “Low valent titanium mediated imino-pinacol coupling: an improved and expeditious route to vicinal diamino-based ligands”, The Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol. 63, pp. 3468–3470, 1998.[Abstract]


Vicinal diamines find extensive applications in radiopharmaceuticals1a-c and as complexing agents and chiral auxiliaries. 2a, b In connection with our ongoing program on nuclear medicine, an efficient route to vicinal diaminobased ligands was needed. Recently, we have been exploring the potential of low valent titanium (LVT) induced carbonyl-olefin McMurry coupling reaction in a multitude of synthetic endeavors. 3, 4a-f Although reductive
coupling of carbonyls to vicinal diols using different LVT reagents5a-e has been ...

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1998

Journal Article

S. Talukdar, Nayak, S. K., and Banerji, A., “Activation of low-valent titanium reagents with iodine: Facile low-temperature mcmurry reaction and n/o-debenzylation/deallylation”, The Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol. 63, pp. 4925–4929, 1998.[Abstract]


A highly reactive, low-valent titanium (LVT) reagent has been prepared by the addition of substoichiometric amounts of iodine to the LVT species generated by Rieke's method (TiCl3−Li−THF). While the conventional McMurry reaction requires high temperatures and prolonged reaction times for the generation of olefins, the present activated LVT reagent is able to effect the reductive coupling of aliphatic as well as aromatic carbonyls to the corresponding olefins at lower temperatures and much reduced reaction times. The protocol is also useful for the intramolecular coupling reactions leading to the one-step synthesis of heterocycles. The temperature-controlled McMurry reaction provides enhanced diastereoselectivity and features an excellent chemoselectivity. In addition to the McMurry reaction, other SET-induced carbon−heteroatom (O, N) bond cleavages can also be carried out with the activated reagent at a fast rate and at a low temperature in high yields.

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1997

Journal Article

P. Pradhan, Gangan, V. D., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Banerji, A., “Stereochemical Assignment of Tertiary Hydroxyl Group in Diterpene Furan Glycosides by Pyridine Induced Shifts, 13C-and 2D-NMR Spectroscopy”, Spectroscopy letters, vol. 30, pp. 1467–1474, 1997.[Abstract]


The stereochemistry of the tertiary hydroxyl group in diterpene furan glycosides viz. cordifolisides D (1) and cordifoliside E (2) has been assigned on the basis of pyridine
solvent induced shifts (PIS) in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The methyl and the methylene groups occupying positions vicinal, 1, 3-diaxial and geminal to the tertiary hydroxyl group
were deshielded to different extent depending on the dihedral angle. The stereochemical assignments are well supported by 13C-γ shifts and 2D Overhauser spectroscopy.

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1997

Journal Article

P. Pradhan, Gangan, V. D., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Banerji, A., “Two phytoecdysones fromTinospora cordifolia: Structural assignments by 2D NMR spectroscopy”, Indian J. Chem., vol. 36, no. B, p. 958, 1997.

1997

Journal Article

S. Talukdar, Pradhan, P., and Banerji, A., “Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions of C60 with n-and$π$-Donors: A Rational Approach Towards its Solubility”, Fullerenes, Nanotubes, and Carbon Nanostructures, vol. 5, pp. 547–557, 1997.[Abstract]


t Investigations on molecular interactions of C60 with a variety of solvents show that its solubility is largely controlled by efficient charge transfer interactions between electron deficient C60, with suitable n-and π-donors. Organic species having a lone pair of electron on heteroatoms (n-donors) and/or π-electron cloud (π-donors) which are capable of forming charge transfer complexes with C60, are better solvents. Solvent-C60 interaction studies thus help in the rational design of solvents and has led to the discovery of several new

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1997

Journal Article

G. P. Kalena, Pradhan, P. P., Swaranlatha, Y., Singh, T. P., and Banerji, A., “Intramolecular photorearrangement of a 2-alkenyl-4-chromanone to an oxapentacyclotetradecanedione”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 38, pp. 5551–5554, 1997.[Abstract]


A novel transformation of 7-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-4-chromanone (1) to intramolecular 1,3-arene-alkene photocycloadduct, (1S,2R,5S,7S,10S,13R)6,6,10-trimethyl-14-oxapentacyclo[8.3.1.01,7.02,1305,13] tetradecane-3,12-dione (3) via secondary photorearrangement of 1,2-arene-alkene photocycloadduct (2) has been described.

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1997

Journal Article

G. P. Kalena, Jain, A., and Banerji, A., “Amberlyst 15 catalyzed prenylation of phenols: one-step synthesis of benzopyrans”, Molecules, vol. 2, pp. 100–105, 1997.[Abstract]


A convenient one-step synthesis of 2,2-dimethylchromans and chromenes using Amberlyst 15 as a catalyst is described.

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1997

Journal Article

S. Talukdar and Banerji, A., “Bio-Organometallics: An emerging Area of Nuclear Medicine”, Indian Journal of Nuclear Medicine, vol. 12, p. 180, 1997.

1997

Journal Article

S. Talukdar and Banerji, A., “Design and development of new chemical reactions via low-valent titanium-induced cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds”, Journal of the Indian Chemical Society (Prof. T.R. Govindachari Commemoration Issue), vol. 74, pp. 842–847, 1997.

1996

Journal Article

G. R. Shivakumar, Raman, K. V. Anantha, Magadum, S. B., Datta, R. K., Hussain, S. S., Banerji, A., and Chowdhury, S. K., “Effect of phytoecdysteroid on spinning, cocoon and reeling parameters of the silkworm, Bombyx mori”, L. Allelopathy Journal, vol. 3, pp. 71–76, 1996.

1996

Journal Article

V. D. Gangan, Pradhan, P., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Banerji, A., “Diterpene Furan Glycosides from Tinospora cordifolia: Structural Elucidation of Palmitosides C, F by 2D NMR Spectroscopy”, Indian J. Chem., vol. 35 , no. 6, pp. 630-634, 1996.

1996

Journal Article

V. D. Gangan, Pradhan, P., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Banerji, A., “Palmatosides, C,F; Diterpene furann glucosides from Tinospora cordifolia – Structural elucidation by 2D NMR Spectroscopy”, Indian Journal of Chemistry, vol. 35, no. B, p. 630, 1996.

1996

Journal Article

P. N. Patil, Salvi, N. A., Udupa, S. R., and Banerji, A., “Enantiomeric synthesis of pyridyl-1-ethanol using Rhizopus arrhizus”, Biotechnology Letters, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 159-162, 1996.[Abstract]


Enantiomers of pyridyl-1-ethanols have been prepared via microbial reduction of pyridyl-1-ethanones and hydrolysis of (±)-pyridyl-1-ethyl acetates using Rhizopus arrhizus.

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1996

Journal Article

S. Talukdar and Banerji, A., “Low-Valent Titanium Mediated Reductive Deoxygenation of Carbonyls to Methylenes Via Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Cleavage in N-(Arylmethyl) Anilines”, Synthetic communications, vol. 26, pp. 1051–1056, 1996.[Abstract]


The reduction of aryl aldehydes and ketones in neutral medium, to the corresponding hydrocarbons via carbon-nitrogen bond cleavage of the intermediate N- (arylmethyl) anilines with low-valent titanium reagents is described. It provides a mild, convenient and selective pathway for deoxygenation of carbonyls without the production of any side product.

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1996

Journal Article

V. Kabaleeswaran, Rajan, S. S., Kalena, G. P., Pradhan, P., and Banerji, A., “(1alpha$, 3alpha$, 11alpha)-2, 2, 11-Trimethyl-14-oxatetracyclo [6.5. 0.17, 11.03, 8] tetradec-6-ene-5, 9-dione”, Acta Crystallographica Section C: Crystal Structure Communications, vol. 52, pp. 1981–1983, 1996.[Abstract]


The title compound, C16H20O3, was prepared by the photolysis of 7-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-4-chromanone. The H7 and H9 atoms are in an [alpha] configuration. The cyclobutane ring is non-planar, the cyclohexenone ring has a half-chair conformation, the pyranone ring has a sofa conformation and the cycloheptanone ring has a boat conformation. The groups of atoms C11, C12, C13, O14 and C12, C13, O14, C4 are both planar.
Formula: C16H20O3

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1995

Journal Article

N. A. Salvi, Patil, P. N., Udupa, S. R., and Banerji, A., “Biotransformations with Rhizopus arrhizus: Preparation of the enantiomers of 1-phenylethanol and 1-( fo-, m-and p-methoxyphenyl) ethanols”, Tetrahedron: Asymmetry, vol. 6, pp. 2287–2290, 1995.[Abstract]


The fungus Rhizopus arrhizus has been used for the reduction of acetophenone and its o-, m- and p-methoxy derivatives 1a–d to the corresponding (S)-(−)-alcohols. Their racemic acetates were also hydrolyzed to (R)-(+)-alcohols. The analysis of products revealed that maximum enantioselectivity (78–88 %ee) could be obtained using m-methoxy acetophenone as substrate.

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1995

Journal Article

V. D. Gangan, Pradhan, P., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Banerji, A., “Norditerpene furan glycosides from Tinospora cordifolia”, Phytochemistry, vol. 39, pp. 1139–1142, 1995.[Abstract]


Two new norditerpene furan glycosides (cordifoliside D and cordifoliside E) were isolated, as their tetraacetates, from the polar butanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia stems. The structural elucidations and relative configurations are based on high-resolution 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

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1995

Journal Article

G. R. Shivakumar, Raman, K. V. Anantha, K. Reddy, V. Rami, Magadum, S. B., Datta, R. K., Hussain, S. S., Banerji, A., and Chowdhury, S. K., “Effect of Photoecdysteroids on Larval Maturation and Economic Parameters of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori”, Indian J. Seric., vol. 34, p. 46, 1995.

1995

Journal Article

J. N. Mathur, Murali, M. S., Iyer, R. H., Ramanujam, A., Dhami, P. S., Gopalakrishnan, V., Rao, M. K., Badheka, L. P., and Banerji, A., “Extraction chromatographic separation of minor actinides from PUREX high-level wastes using CMPO”, Nuclear technology, vol. 109, pp. 216–225, 1995.[Abstract]


An extraction chromatographic technique using octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) adsorbed on chromosorb-102 (CAC) has been tested as an alternative to the TRUEXsolvent extraction process, where CMPO has been used as the extracting agent to recover minor actinides from high-activity waste (HAW) solutions of PUREX origin. The batchwise uptake behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Eu(III), Zr(IV), Fe(III), Ru(III), and from a nitric acid medium by CAC has been studied. The uptake of actinides and lanthanides are higher than those of other fission products and inert materials. The batchwise loading experiments in the presence of Nd(III)/U(VI) have shown that at lower concentrations of these metal ions, the uptake of Pu(IV), U(VI), and Am(III) are reasonably high. Studies on loading of Nd(III), U(VI), and Pu(IV) on a column containing 1.7 g of CAC have shown that Nd(III) (30 mg) and U(VI) (90 mg) could be loaded, while Pu(IV) (∼0.6 mg) was loaded on a small column containing 100 mg of CAC without any breakthrough. Further, a synthetic HAW solution as such and the actual PUREX HAW solution, after depleting the uranium content by a 30% tributyl-phosphate contact, were loaded on a CAC column. The effluents did not contain any alpha activity above the background level. The activities could subsequently be eluted with 0.04 M HNO3 (americium and rare earths), 0.01M oxalic acid (plutonium), and 0.25 M Na2CO3 [U(VI)]. The recoveries of these metal ions were found to be >99%.

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1995

Journal Article

V. Gopalakrishnan, Dhami, P., Ramanujam, A., Krishna, M., Murali, M., Mathur, J., Iyer, R., Bauri, A., and Banerji, A., “Extraction and extraction chromatographic separation of minor actinides from sulphate bearing high level waste solutions using CMPO”, Journal of radioanalytical and nuclear chemistry, vol. 191, pp. 279–289, 1995.[Abstract]


Bench-Scale studies on the partitioning and recovery of minoractinides from the actual and synthetic sulphate-bearing high level waste (SBHLW) solutions have been carried out by giving two contacts with 30% TBP to deplete uranium content followed by four contacts with 0.2M CMPO+1.2M TBP in dodecane. The acidity of the SBHLW solutions was about 0.3M. In the case of actual SBHLW, the final raffinate contained about 0.4% -activity originally present in the HLW, whereas with synthetic SBHLW the -activity was reduced to the background level.144Ce is extracted almost quantitative in the CMPO phase,106Ru about 12% and137Cs is practically not extracted at all. The extraction chromatographic column studies with synthetic SBHLW (aftertwo TBP contacts) has shown that large volume of waste solutions could be passed through the column without break-through of actinide metal ions. Using 0.04M HNO3>99% Am(III) and rare earths could be eluted/stripped. Similarly >99% Pu(IV) and U(VI) could be eluted.stripped using 0.01M oxalic acid and 0.25M sodium carbonate, respectively. In the presence of 0.16M SO 4 2– (in the SBHLW) the complex ions AmSO 4 + , UO2SO4, PuSO 4 2+ and Pu(SO4)2 were formed in the aqueous phase but the species extracted into the organic phase (CMPO+TBP) were only the nitrato complexes Am(NO3)3·3CMPO, UO2(NO3)2·2CMPO and Pu(NO3)4·2CMPO. A scheme for the recovery of minor actinides from SBHLW solution with two contacts of 30% TBP followed by either solvent extraction or extraction chromatographic techniques has been proposed.

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1995

Journal Article

S. Talukdar, Nayak, S. K., and Banerji, A., “Remarkable Effect of Fullerenes on Low-Valent Titanium Mediated Organic Reaction”, Fullerene Science and Technology, vol. 3, pp. 327-332, 1995.[Abstract]


Addition of catalytic amounts of fullerenes as coordinating ligand to the low valent titanium reagent resulted in the remarkable increase in the yields of phenanthrenes (3) from orthomethoxy aryl aldehydes/ketones (1) (SCHEME I) via intramolecular C-C coupling. This is the first report on the use of fullerenes as a ligand in transition metal mediated organic synthesis.

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1995

Journal Article

S. Talukdar and Banerji, A., “Low-Valent Titanium Mediated Deprotection of N-Allyl/Benzyl Amines: A New Approach”, Synthetic communications, vol. 25, pp. 813–818, 1995.[Abstract]


A novel low-valent titanium (LVT) mediated cleavage of N-allyl/benzyl amines is reported. Regio- and chemo-selective cleavages were also observed.

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1994

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Insect plant interactions: natural insect control agents”, Recent Advances in Insect Physiology and-Toxicology. Ed. by G UJAR, GT New Delhi: Agricole Publishing Academy, pp. 41–47, 1994.

1994

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Deshpande, A. D., Prabhu, B. R., and Pradhan, P., “Tomentonone, a new xanthonoid from the stem bark of Calophyllum tomentosum”, Journal of Natural Products, vol. 57, pp. 396–399, 1994.

1994

Journal Article

P. Pradhan, Luthria, D. L., and Banerji, A., “Pimolin, a new class of natural product from Pimpinella monoica : A novel dimeric furochromone”, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol. 4, pp. 2425–2428, 1994.[Abstract]


Pimolin (1), a novel dimer of the furochromone, visnagin, has been isolated from the chloroform extracts of the seeds of the plant, Pimpinella monoica. Its structure as elucidated by multidimentional 1H and 13C nmr spectroscopy via. long range coupling (COLOC and COSYLR), indicated 2+2 pyrone-furan cycloaddition.

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1994

Journal Article

V. D. Gangan, Pradhan, P., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Banerji, A., “Cordifolisides A, B, C: Norditerpene furan glycosides from Tinospora cordifolia”, Phytochemistry, vol. 37, pp. 781–786, 1994.[Abstract]


Several glycosides were isolated, as polyacetates, from the n-BuOH fraction of the Tinospora cordifolia stems. The structures of three new norditerpene furan glycosides cordifoliside A, B and C have been established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

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1994

Journal Article

P. Pradhan, Desai, S. J., Badheka, L. P., and Banerji, A., “Neolignans from Indian Piper Species: Structure of Hookerinone A, a novel Neolignan”, Natural Product Letters, vol. 4, pp. 35–42, 1994.[Abstract]


A new neolignan hookerinone A (1) along with three other members of the same group viz. kadsurin A (2), isodihydrofutoquinol A (3) and isodihydrofutoquinol B (4) have been isolated from three Indian Piper species. The structure of the new compound has been elucidated as (8R, 1′ R or 8S, 1′ S)-4-[2-(1, 3-benzodioxolo-5-yl)-1-methylethyl]-2, 5- dimethoxy-1-propenyl-2, 5-cyclohexadienone, on the basis of 2D-NOESY, HC-COSY, COLOC and other 2D-NMR techniques.

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1994

Journal Article

J. N. Mathur, Murali, M. S., Rizvi, G. H., Iyer, R. H., Michael, K. M., Kapoor, S. C., Dhumwad, R. K., Badheka, L. P., and Banerji, A., “Separation and recovery of plutonium from oxalate supernatant using CMPO”, Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange, vol. 12, pp. 745–763, 1994.[Abstract]


A s imp1e and efficient procedure has been developed to quantitatively recover Pu from oxalate supernatant using a mixture of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and TBP in dodecane. Pu(IV) in the range of 6.9 to 34.6 mg/1 was quantitatively extracted into 0.2M CMPO + 1.2 M TBP in dodecane from an aqueous solution containing 3.0 M HNO3 and 0.1 M H2C2O4. At such low concentrations of Pu, the distribution ratio (D) did not change but the increase in oxalic acid concentration drastically reduced these values. The variation in HNO3 concentration at a fixed concentration of 0.2 M CMPO + 1.2 N TBP has shown a dramatic increase in the D values, being 0.3 at 1.0 M and >104 at 7.5 M. The extraction was almost quantitative even at the aqueous to organic ratio of 10:1. Plutonium could be quantitatively recovered by (i) stripping with 0.5 M acetic acid and (ii) coprecipitating it directly from the organic phase with 0.3 M oxalic acid + 0.3 M calcium nitrate + sodium nitrite. ∼92% of the Pu was found in the precipitate and ” ∼7% in the supernatant. Using this procedure, Pu in a concentrated form ( ∼50 times), could be recovered from the oxalate supernatant solutions without recourse to the destruction of oxalate Ion. The slope of 2 from the plot of log D ve log [NO3 −] and log [CMPO] respectively suggest the species in the organic phase to be PuC2O4(NO3)2. 2CMPO. The absorption spectral study of Pu(IV) confirmed the above observations.

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1994

Journal Article

S. K. Nayak, Kadam, S. M., Talukdar, S., and Banerji, A., “Low-valent titanium: New synthetic applications (Invited contribution)”, Journal of the Indian Institute of Science, vol. 74, pp. 401-410, 1994.[Abstract]


During the course of our work on the synthesis of bioactive compounds, new low-valent titanium (LVT)- mediated reactions were discovered. These include: i) a short synthesis of oxygen heterocycles via intramolecular reductive deoxygenation between ketone and ester functions in aromatic systems, ii) an unusual ortho-hydroxyl-assisted reduction/isomerisation of aromatic alkenes, iii) reductive dealkoxylation of aryl alkyl ethers, iv) one-pot synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from o-alkoxy aromatic aldehydes/ketones involving reductive deoxygenation, reductive dealkoxylation and intramolecular C-C coupling in tandem, v) a novel approach to the deprotection of allyl, propargyl and benzyl ethers of alcohols and phenols and N-benzyl/allyl amines, and vi) modulation of the activity of LVT reagent by nitrogen heterocycles. Mechanism and synthetic implications of these reactions are discussed.

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1994

Journal Article

T. K. Sarkar, Ghorai, B. K., and Banerji, A., “Intramolecular alder ene approach to stereochemical control over three contiguous stereogenic centres: Synthesis of (+-)-methyl cucurbate and (+-)-methyl epijasmonate”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 35, pp. 6907–6908, 1994.[Abstract]


The total synthesis of epijasmonoids, (±)-methyl cucurbate and (±)-methyl epijasmonate is described starting from aldehyde 14, where the key step is a highly stereocontrolled 5- (3,4) ene cyclization 17 → 18.

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1993

Journal Article

R. V. Omkumar, Kadam, S. M., Banerji, A., and Ramasarma, T., “On the involvement of intramolecular protein disulfide in the irreversible inactivation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase by diallyl disulfide”, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)-Protein Structure and Molecular Enzymology, vol. 1164, pp. 108–112, 1993.[Abstract]


Treatment with diallyl disulfide, a constituent of garlic oil, irreversibly inactivated microsomal and a soluble 50 kDa form of HMG-CoA reductase. No radioactivity was found to be protein-bound on treating the soluble enzyme with [35S]diallyl disulfide, indicating the absence of the mixed disulfide of the type allyl-S-S-protein. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses of the diallyl-disulfide-treated protein showed no traces of the dimer of the type protein-S-S-protein, but clearly indicated BME-reversible increased mobility, as expected of an intramolecular protein disulfide. The sulfhydryl groups, as measured by alkylation with iodo[2-14C]acetic acid, were found to decrease in the diallyl-disulfide-treated enzyme protein. Tryptic peptide analysis also gave support for the possible presence of disulfide-containing peptides in such a protein. It appears that diallyl disulfide inactivated HMG-CoA reductase by forming an internal protein disulfide that became inaccessible for reduction by DTT, and thereby retaining the inactive state of the enzyme.

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1993

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Novel bioactivities of phytochemicals”, Traditional Medicine, Ed. B. Mukherji, pp. 177-182, 1993.

1993

Journal Article

D. Lakshmicha Luthria, Ramakrishnan, V., and Banerji, A., “Insect antifeedant activity of furochromones: Structure-activity relationships”, Journal of natural products, vol. 56, pp. 671–675, 1993.[Abstract]


Thirty chromone derivatives, both synthetic and natural, were assayed for feeding deterrent activity against Spodoptera litura larvae to establish structure-activity relationships. Among the compounds tested, furochromones with alkoxy substituents at C-4 or C-9 exhibited maximum feeding deterrent activity. Loss of activity was noticed with the degradation or saturation of either of the heterocyclic rings. Substitution of C-7 methyl of the gamma-pyrone ring and dealkylation of C-4 or C-9 methoxyl also caused considerable reduction in feeding deterrent activity.

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1993

Journal Article

P. N. Patil, Chattopadhyay, A., ,, and Banerji, A., “Biotransformations with Rhizopus arrhizus: Preparation of enantiomers of sulcatol”, Biotechnology letters, vol. 15, pp. 367–372, 1993.[Abstract]


Microbial reduction of 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (1) and hydrolysis of (±)-sulcatol acetate (4) yielded (S)-(+)-sulcatol (2) and (R)-(-)-sulcatol (5) respectively using Rhizopus arrhizus.

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1993

Journal Article

P. Pradhan, Chintalwar, G. J., and Banerji, A., “Stereochemistry of a Guainolide fromCyathocline purpurea, by high resolution NMR spectroscopy”, Spect. Letts., vol. 26, p. 997, 1993.[Abstract]


The stereochemistry of a sesquiterpene, 6α-hydroxy-4(14),10(15)-guaianadien-8β,12-olide (2) was established by high resolution and 2D-NMR spectroscopy. Careful analysis of the long range couplings along with vicinal spin-spin coupling constants predict a trans fusion of the lactone ring. Further information on the stereochemistry of 2 was obtained from 2D-NOESY and ROESY experiments.

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1993

Journal Article

J. N. Mathur, Murali, M. S., Natarajan, P. R., Badheka, L. P., Banerji, A., Ramanujam, A., Dhami, P. S., Gopalakrishnan, V., Dhumwad, R. K., and Rao, M. K., “Partitioning of actinides from high-level waste streams of PUREX process using mixtures of CMPO and TBP in dodecane”, Waste Management, vol. 13, pp. 317–325, 1993.[Abstract]


The extraction of actinides from high active aqueous raffinate waste (HAW) as well as high-level waste (HLW) solutions arising from Purex processing of thermal reactor fuels has been studied using a mixture of octyl(phenyl)-N N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and TBP in dodecane. The results on the extraction and stripping of actinides, lanthanides, and other fission products are discussed. Optimum conditions are proposed for the efficient recovery of residual actinides from HAW and HLW streams by CMPO extraction followed by their selective stripping with suitable reagents. Experiments on the extraction and separation of actinides and lanthanides by CMPO in the presence of TBP in dodecane have also been carried out with U(VI) and Nd(III) to arrive at the limiting conditions for avoiding third-phase formation.

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1993

Journal Article

J. N. Mathur, Murali, M. S., Rizvi, G. H., Iyer, R. H., Michael, K. M., KAPOORT, S. C., Ramanujam, A., Badheka, L. P., and Banerji, A., “Extraction chromatographic separation and recovery of plutonium from oxalate supernatant using CMPO”, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, vol. 30, pp. 1198–1200, 1993.[Abstract]


The conversion of plutonium nitrate solution to plutonium oxide via oxalate precipitation route leads to a large volume of oxalate supernatant which contains"'30 mg/dm'of Pu in"'3 mol/dm'HNO, and 0.1 mol/dm'oxalic acid. Plutonium can be recovered from such solutions after the destruction of oxalic acid for which the conventional methods are:(1) Addition of KMn04 and then destroying excess KMnO, by H202.(2) Concentration of the supernatant to high terminal HNO, concentration of 10 mol/dm'at high temperature< 1>. The first method...

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1993

Journal Article

J. Mathur, Murali, M., Nagar, M., Natarajan, P., Badheka, L., and Banerji, A., “Solvent extracted and extraction chromatographically adsorbed complexes of bifunctional extractants with f-elements”, Journal of radioanalytical and nuclear chemistry, Letters, vol. 175, pp. 415–426, 1993.[Abstract]


The IR spectra of the solvent extracted and extraction chromatographically adsorbed complexes of HNO3, Nd(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) with bifunctional extractants dihexyl N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylophosphonate (CMP) and octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO) have been recorded. The shifts in the P=0 and C=0 streching frequencies have been interpreted. The nitrate ions bound with metal ions were found to be bidentate. The nature of binding of the extractant to the metal ions in the solvent extracted and extraction chromatographically adsorbed complexes were found to be similar.

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1993

Journal Article

S. K. Nayak, Kadam, S. M., and Banerji, A., “Selective deprotection of ethers by low-valent titanium: facile cleavage of propargyl ethers”, Synlett, pp. 581–582, 1993.[Abstract]


Selective deprotection of propargyl ethers of alcohols and phenols (12 examples) in the presence of allyl, benzyl and methyl ethers by low-valent titanium (TiCl3-Mg-THF) is reported. Ease of cleavage is in the order propargyl > allyl > benzyl.

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1992

Journal Article

G. J. Chintalwar, Ramakrishnan, V., Luthria, D. L., and Banerji, A., “Insect Antifeedants from the roots of Psoralea corylifolia Linn.”, Indian journal of experimental biology, vol. 30, pp. 858–859, 1992.

1992

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Biotechnical Potential of Natural Products”, 27, p. 105, 1992.[Abstract]


The potential of natural products has been recognized since antiquity. They continue to contribute a great deal to modern industries by providing a wide range of chemicals; many of them now vital to modern life, such as antibiotics, cardiac drugs and insecticides, were discovered from living organisms.

Traditionally, natural product research has primarily centred around the structural elucidation of compounds. However, in recent years, research has been directed towards the physiological and ecological significance of these chemicals. We have just begun to understand the role of naturally occurring chemicals in the biological interactions of organisms with their ecosystems. The study of natural products not only provides novel bioactive compounds, but also helps in the understanding of nature's way of tackling environmental problems. These processes, which may be called “Natural Technology”, might provide us with totally new means and agents for combating diseases, controlling pests or improving agricultural productivity.

The extension of research to marine natural products has paid rich dividends. Polyoxygenated compounds such as tetrodotoxins, palytoxins and halichondrins show novel bioelectric properties which influence the ionic permeability of biological membranes. Some of these compounds show remarkable antitumour and immunomodulatory activities. So far, only a small proportion of the known flora has been subjected to chemical or biological investigations; the vast unexplored biotechnical potential of flora awaits discovery and exploitation.

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1992

Journal Article

J. N. Mathur, Murali, M. S., Natarajan, P. R., Badheka, L. P., Banerji, A., Michael, K. M., Kapoor, S. C., and Dhumwad, R. K., “Tail-end purification of americium from plutonium loading effluents using a mixture of octyl (phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and tri-N-butyl phosphate”, Journal of radioanalytical and nuclear chemistry, vol. 165, pp. 219–227, 1992.[Abstract]


The tail-end purification of Am from Pu loading effluents in 7.5M HNO3 containing ∼160 mg l−1 Am and ∼1.2 mg l−1 Pu has been carried out. With 0.2M CMPO+1.2M TBP in dodecane as the extractant and stripping by 0.04M HNO3+0.05M NaNO2, the Pu level is brought down to ∼31.2 μg l−1. When the acidity was reduced to 4.2M HNO3, one contact with 20% TLA/dodecane and subsequent extraction by a mixture of CMPO and TBP and stripping with 0.04M HNO3+0.05M NaNO2 gave Am samples without any detectable amounts of Pu. The recovery of Am was ∼90% by the first procedure and ∼98% by the second one.

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1992

Journal Article

J. N. Mathur, Murali, M. S., Natarajan, P. R., Badheka, L. P., and Banerji, A., “Extraction of actinides and fission products by octyl (phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide from nitric acid media”, Talanta, vol. 39, pp. 493–496, 1992.[Abstract]


Extraction of promethium(III), uranium(VI), plutonium(IV), americium(III), zirconium(IV), ruthenium(III), iron(III) and palladium(II) has been carried out with a mixture of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl phosphate (TBP) in dodecane. The effects of nitric acid, TBP and CMPO concentrations on the extraction of these metal ions have been studied. The nature of the species of the above metal ions extracted into the organic phase has been suggested.

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1992

Journal Article

A. Banerji, “Application of Isotopes in Bio-Organic Chemistry”, BARC News Letter , vol. 103, 1992.

1992

Journal Article

G. P. Kalena, Pradhan, P., and Banerji, A., “A novel intramolecular 1, 2-arene-alkene photocycloaddition”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 33, pp. 7775–7778, 1992.[Abstract]


A novel intramolecular 1,2-arene-alkene photocycloaddition of 2-alkenyl-7-hydroxy-4-chromanone(1) and its alkyl ethers (2 and 3) to (4α, 7α, 9α)4,8,8-trimethyl-14-oxatetracyclo(6.5.14,13.01,9)tetradeca-12-ene-2,11-dione (4) is described.

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1992

Journal Article

S. M. Kadam, Nayak, S. K., and Banerji, A., “Low-valent titanium: a new approach to deprotection of allyl and benzyl groups”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 33, pp. 5129–5132, 1992.[Abstract]


A novel method for the deprotection of allyl and benzyl derivatives of alcohols and phenols by low-valent titanium [Ti(O)] is reported. The possible mechanism is discussed.

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1991

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Luthria, D. L., “Assignment of Methoxyl Resonances and Observation of Restricted Rotation of B-Ring of 2′-Methoxy Flavones by 2D-Noesy in Conjunction with Asis”, Spectroscopy letters, vol. 24, pp. 1047–1057, 1991.[Abstract]


2D-NOESY in conjunction with aromatic solvent induced shifts (ASIS) allowed unequivocal assignments of methoxyl resonances in polymethoxylated pyranoflavones thus
providing an additional aid for the structural elucidation of natural products. In addition, the unusual nOe interactions observed in 2′-substituted B-ring flavones with H-3 or H-4 ″of
the pyran ring suggested hindered rotation of the B-ring.

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1991

Journal Article

R. V. Om Kumar, Banerji, A., Kurup, C. K. Ramakrishn, and Ramasarma, T., “The nature of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase by garlic-derived diallyl disulfide”, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)-Protein Structure and Molecular Enzymology, vol. 1078, pp. 219–225, 1991.[Abstract]


A concentration dependent inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG CoA) reductase was found on preincubation of microsomal preparations with diallyl disulfide, a component of garlic oil. This inhibited state was only partially reversed even with high concentrations of DTT. Glutathione, a naturally occurring reducing thiol agent, was ineffective. The substrate, HMG CoA, but not NADPH, was able to give partial protection for the DTT-dependent, but not glutathione-dependent activity. The garlic-derived diallyl disulfide is the most effective among the sulfides tested for inhibition of HMG CoA reductase. Formation of protein internal disulfides, inaccessible for reduction by thiol agents, but not of protein dimer, is likely to be the cause of this inactivation.

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1991

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Luthria, D. L., “Structural Elucidation of Isomeric Pyronoflavones by 2D-NOESY”, Spect. Letts, vol. 24, p. 471, 1991.[Abstract]


Unequivocal assignments of the uncoupled protons at H-3 and H-6/H-8 of pyranoflavones by 2D-NOESY experiments have made it possible to distinguish linear and angular isomers. This study also suggests that the linear structure (carpachromene, 1) assigned to a pyranoflavone isolated from Atalantia ceylanica should be revised to angular form (atalantoflavone, 4). 2D-NOESY is also useful for differentiating 3′ 4′-and 2′ 4′-disubstituted B-ring flavones.

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1991

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Deshpande, A. D., and Pradhan, P., “Structure of Zeloxanthonone-A Reinvestigation”, Tetrahedron Letters, vol. 32, p. 4995, 1991.[Abstract]


The structure of zeyloxanthonone has been unambiguously established as 1,2,3,4- tetrahydro- 6,8- dihydroxy- 1,1,7- tris (3- methyl but-2- enyl)- xanthene-2,9- dione (1) by 2D NMR spectroscopy, isotopic exchange and chemical reactions.

The long standing controversy of the structure (1 or 2) of zeyloxanthonone has been settled. Unequivocal evidences for structure 1 have been obtained.

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1991

Journal Article

D. L. Luthria, Ramkrishnan, V., and Banerji, A., “Antifeedants from Pimpinella monoica”, Insect Science and Its Application , vol. 13, p. 245, 1991.[Abstract]


The crude n-hexane and methanol extracts of the aerial parts of plant, Pimpinella monoica Dalz. (Umbelliferae) showed significant feeding deterrency to Spodoptera litura F. larvae. Phytochemical investigation of these extracts has resulted into the isolation of one furanocoumarin and five biogenetically related furanochromones. Furanocoumarin, isopimpinellin was found to be most active. Furochromones, visnagin and khellin exhibited significant activity while their hydroxymethyl analogues, khellol and ammiol showed moderate activity. α-Hydroxyisopropyldihydrofurochromone, visamminol was found to be least active.

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1991

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Nayak, S. K., “Unprecedented reductive dealkoxylation of aryl alkyl ethers and intramolecular C–C coupling of 2, 2′-dialkoxystilbenes with low valent titanium: one-pot synthesis of phenanthrenes”, J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., pp. 1432–1434, 1991.[Abstract]


Facile dealkoxylation of aryl alkyl ethers has been carried out using TiCl3–Li–THF (tetrahydrofuran); a novel one-pot synthesis of phenanthrenes from ortho-alkoxyaromatic aldehydes/ketones is described.

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1991

Journal Article

S. K. Nayak and Banerji, A., “Stereocontrolled reductive deoxygenation using low-valent titanium: effects of ultrasound waves and solvents”, The Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol. 56, pp. 1940–1942, 1991.

1991

Journal Article

S. K. Nayak and Banerji, A., “Low valent titanium in organic synthesis: Synthesis of diarylalkanes from o-hydroxyaromatic keto compounds”, Indian journal of chemistry. Sect. B: Organic chemistry, including medical chemistry, vol. 30, pp. 286–287, 1991.

1990

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Luthria, D. L., “Benzene induced 1H NMR shifts of chromeno-compounds: an aid to differentiate linear and angular chromenoflavones”, Spectroscopy letters, vol. 23, pp. 1–12, 1990.[Abstract]


Benzene-induced shifts (BIS) in the 1H NMR spectra of nine chromeno-compounds have been studied. It provides a simple non-destructive technique for distinguishing linear isomers of chromenoflavones from there angular counterpart. BIS also assists in the assignment of chromene proton signals in chromeno-compounds.

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1990

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Luthria, D. L., and Kokate, S. D., “Toxicity of capillin, the insecticidal principle of Artemisia nilagirica Clarke.”, Indian journal of experimental biology, vol. 28, pp. 588–589, 1990.[Abstract]


A petrol extract of Artemisia nilagirica was toxic to late 3rd-instar larvae of the mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus [C. quinquefasciatus]. Bioassay directed fractionation led to the isolation of an insecticidal principle, identified as capillin (1-phenyl-2,4-hexadiyn-1-one).

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1990

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Luthria, D. L., “Synthesis of Dimethylethers of Atalantoflavone, Carpachromene and their Analogues”, Indian Journal of Chemistry Section B-Organic Chemistry Including Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 163-165, 1990.

1990

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Nayak, S. K., “Synthesis of O-heterocycles via intramolecular reductive deoxygenation of o-aroyloxyacetophenones: one-step synthesis of benzofurans”, J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., pp. 150–151, 1990.[Abstract]


A one-step synthesis of benzofurans via Intramolecular reductive coupling of o-aroyloxyacetophenones using titanium(IV) chloride and zinc is described.

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1990

Journal Article

Dr. Asoke Banerji and Luthria, D. L., “2D-NMR Spectroscopy in Conjunction with ASIS: A Direct Method of Structure Elucidation of Natural Products”, Indian Journal of Chemistry Section B-Organic Chemistry Including Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 29B, pp. 582-583, 1990.

1989

Journal Article

V. Ramakrishnan, Chintalwar, G. J., and Banerji, A., “Environmental persistence of diallyl disulfide, an insecticidal principle of garlic and its metabolism in mosquito, Culex pipiens quinquifasciatus Say”, Chemosphere, vol. 18, pp. 1525–1529, 1989.[Abstract]


Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a major insecticidal principle of garlic, L, has low environmental persistence; there is an exponential loss of [35S] DADS from the treated water with respect to time. Compared to larvae, pupae of Say, exhibit higher tolerance to this pesticide. Both, larvae and pupae metabolise [35S] DADS to inorganic [35S] sulfate.

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1989

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Chintalwar, G. J., “Fate of leucine in the biosynthesis of bakuchiol, a meroterpene from Psoralea corylifolia.”, Indian journal of biochemistry & biophysics, vol. 26, pp. 394–396, 1989.[Abstract]


Significant incorporations of labelled leucine, valine and isovaleric acid into the meroterpene, bakuchiol (1) isolated from the medicinal plant, Psoralea corylifolia have been observed. Degradation experiments show that labels from these substrates find their way into both phenylpropane derived as well as terpenic part of 1 thereby indicating that none of the known pathways is operative in the case of 1. It is suggested that these substrates are metabolised to CO2 which is then incorporated into 1.

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1989

Journal Article

D. L. Luthria, Ramakrishnan, V., Verma, G. S., Prabhu, B. R., and Banerji, A., “Insect antifeedants from Atalantia racemosa”, Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, vol. 37, pp. 1435–1437, 1989.[Abstract]


Seven coumarin derivatives have been isolated from the n-hexane and methano1 extracts of aerial part of Atalandia racemosa Wgi ht and Am. (Rutaoeae) and tested for antifetedan activity against Spodoptera litura F. larvae. Among these, xanthotoxin ia the most active and luvangetin is moderately active, while xanthyletin and racemoain are active only at higher concentrations. Rutarin, rutaretin, and umbelliferone failed to cause feeding inhibition even at a oonoentralion of 1000 ppm. Antifeedant activities of 17 other structurally related coumarins have also been studied, to establish structure-activity relations.

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1989

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Kalena, G. P., “Heterocycles from diacetyl phenols: synthesis of benzodipyrans, acetylchromenes and pyrano [1, 2] benzisoxazoles (Invited Contribution)”, Heterocycles, vol. 28, pp. 711–718, 1989.[Abstract]


Novel and facile syntheses of benzodipyrans, acetylchramenes and pyranol[1,2]benzisoxazoles from 2,4- and 4,6-diacetylresorcinols have been described. Regioselective condensations and reductions have been used as the key steps.

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1989

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Kalena, G. P., “A New Method of Cyclodehydration of 3, 3-Dialkyl-1-Oxo-1-(2-hydroxyaryl) propan-3-ols to 2, 2-Dialkyl-4-chromanones: Synthesis of Cannabinoid Synthon”, Synthetic Communications, vol. 19, pp. 159–166, 1989.[Abstract]


A new method for cyclodehydration of o-hydroxyaryl-β-ketols to 4-chromanones using HMPT is described. The method has general applicability. It is particularly useful for the cyclisation of labile intermediates as exemplified by the synthesis of cannabinoid synthon, 2-methyl-2-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-7-methoxy-4-chromanone.

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1989

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Nayak, S. K., “Sonochemical hydrodimerization of aromatic carbonyl compounds”, Journal of Chemical Research, pp. 314–315, 1989.

1988

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Chintalwar, G. J., “One-pot radiosynthesis of [35S] thiram from elemental sulphur”, Chemosphere, vol. 17, pp. 495–497, 1988.[Abstract]


A simple one-pot radiosynthesis of [35S] thiram from elemental 35S, [35S] dithiocarbamate is described.

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1988

Journal Article

P. S. Variyar, Pendharkar, M. B., Banerji, A., and Bandyopadhyay, C., “Blackening in green pepper berries”, Phytochemistry, vol. 27, pp. 715–717, 1988.[Abstract]


The blackening of fresh green pepper (Piper nigrum) berries was found to be due to the enzyme—catalysed oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy phenylethanol glycoside by an o-diphenol oxidase present in the fruit. The enzyme was also found to be active towards the aglycone of 3,4-dihydroxy phenylethanol glycoside.

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1988

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Luthria, D. L., and Prabhu, B. R., “Prenylated compounds from Atalantia racemosa: isolation and synthesis of two pyranoflavones”, Phytochemistry, vol. 27, pp. 3637–3640, 1988.[Abstract]


A re-examination of the aerial parts of the plant Atalantia racemosa led to the isolation of two new pyranoflavones, namely atalantoflavone [8,8-dimethyl-5-hydroxy-2-(4′-hydroxyphenyl)-4H,8H-benzo-(1,2-b: 3, 4-b′) dipyran-4-one] and racemoflavone [8,8-dimethyl-5-hydroxy-2-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-4H,8H-benzo (1,2-b: 3,4-b′) dipyran-4-one]. The structures have been confirmed by the synthesis of methyl ethers of atalantoflavone and racemoflavone. Besides the pyranoflavones, seven biogenetically related coumarin derivatives namely, xanthyletin, luvangetin, recemosin, xanthotoxin, umbelliferone, rutarin, rutaretin and a triterpene, friedelin have been isolated.

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1988

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Kalena, G. P., “Efficient syntheses of ($\pm$)[2-2H2] mevalonolactone and ($\pm$)[2-2H2] homomevalonolactone”, Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, vol. 25, pp. 111–115, 1988.[Abstract]


Efficient syntheses of (±) [2-2H2]mevalonolactone and (±) [2-2H2]homomevalonolactone involving condensations of lithiotrimethylsilyl [2-2 H2]acetate with appropriate 3-oxo-alcohols are described. Regiospecificity of the label was established by NMR spectroscopy.

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1988

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Goomer, N. C., and Kalena, G. P., “Enolates of Diacetyl Resorcinols: Application to Synthesis of Benzodipyrans”, Indian Journal of Chemistry Section B-Organic Chemistry Including Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 27, pp. 981–984, 1988.[Abstract]


Four benzodipyrans namely, 2,2,8,8-tetramethyl-2H,8H-benzo[1,2-b:5,4-b'][1,2-b:3,4-b']dipyrans (7/8), 2,8-diphenyl-4H,6H-benzo[1,2b:5,4-b']dipyran-4,6-dione(9) and 2,8-diphenyl-4H,10H-benzo[1,2-b:3,4-b']dipyran-4,10-dione (10) have been synthesized. The key step in the synthesis involves cross condensation reactions between the enolates of 4,6-(1) and 2,4-diacetyl-(2)-resorcinols with acetone and benzoyl chloride.

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1986

Journal Article

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Chemistry and biochemistry of allitin-a review”, Gov. of India. Atomic energy commiss., p. 1308, 1986.

1986

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “Synthesis of Rubraflavone-A Trimethyl Ether”, 1986.

1985

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “Synthesis of Cycloartocarpesin Trimethyl Ether”, Synthetic Communications, vol. 15, pp. 1165–1170, 1985.[Abstract]


The Synthesis of chromenoflavone, cycloartocarpesin trimethyl ether (1b) has been achieved through the aroylation of lithium enolate of evodionol (2) with 2,4-dimethoxybenzoyl chloride followed by cyclodehydration of the β-diketone (3) with D-toluenesulphonic acid.

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1984

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Chintalwar, G. J., “Biosynthesis of bakuchiol from cinnamic and p-coumaric acids”, Phytochemistry, vol. 23, pp. 1605–1606, 1984.[Abstract]


Specific incorporation of l-[U-14C]phenylalanine, [U-14C]cinnamic acid and p[2-14C]coumaric acid into bakuchiol has been observed in Psoralea corylifolia. Our findings show that the aromatic moiety along with two carbon atoms of the side chain are biosynthetically derived via phenylpropane pathway and not by the alternate pathway proposed earlier.

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1984

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “SYNTHESIS OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING 6-OXYGENATED-2, 2-DIMETHYLCHROMENES”, Indian J. Chem, vol. 23B, p. 885, 1984.

1984

Journal Article

V. D. Gangan, Pradhan, P., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Asoke, B., “Two new diterpenes furan glycosides from Tinospora cordifolia”, Phytochemistry(in press), 1984.

1983

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Chintalwar, G. J., “Biosynthesis of bakuchiol, a meroterpene from Psoralea corylifolia”, Phytochemistry, vol. 22, pp. 1945–1947, 1983.[Abstract]


Biosynthesis of bakuchiol was examined using phenylalanine and mevalonic acid as substrates. It has been demonstrated that bakuchiol is derived from one phenylpropane (with the loss of one carbon atom) and two isoprenoid (C5) units.

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1983

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Kalena, G. P., “Synthesis of ($\pm$)[2-14C] mevalonolactone in one step”, Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, vol. 20, pp. 163–166, 1983.[Abstract]


Condensation between 1-trimethylsilyloxy-3-butanone and trimethylsilyl [2-14C]acetate gave (±) [2-14C]mevalonolactone in one step.

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1982

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Kalena, G. P., “A Short Synthesis of (+)-Mevalonolactone”, Synthetic Communications, vol. 12, pp. 225–230, 1982.[Abstract]


Mevalonic acid lactone (MVA) labelled with stable as we11 as radioactive isotopes continuesto be one of the most widely used substrates in the biosynthesis of terpenoids. Elucidation of several intricate biochemical processes has been possible through the use of carefully chosen specifically 1abelled MVA.1 Attempts to develop new routes to its synthesis have, therefore, been continued and several elegant syntheses have been reported in recent years.2 Wedescribe here a short and efficient synthesis of MVA in which condensation between butan-1-01-3-one (2a) and acetic acid is brought about through their trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative.3 Usual acidic work up of the reaction brings about cleavage of TMS groups thus obviating deprotection step used in most of the other syntheses.

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1981

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “A NEW SYNTHESIS OF 2, 2-DIALKYLCHROMENES-APPLICATION TO SYNTHESIS OF ANTI-JUVENILE HORMONES PRECOCENES-I AND PRECOCENE-II”, INDIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY SECTION B-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY INCLUDING MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY, vol. 20, pp. 144–146, 1981.

1981

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “Synthesis of tritium labelled precocenes”, Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, vol. 18, pp. 1737–1741, 1981.[Abstract]


Regiospecific syntheses of tritium labelled precocene I (5a) and precocene II (5b), the antijuvenile hormones, have been accomplished. The syntheses involved condensations between 2-hydroxyacetophenones (1) with acetone-T to give cross condensation products 2 which on cyclodehydration furnished 2,2-dimethyl-4-chromanones-(2-gem dimethyl-T) (3). Reduction of 3 with lithium aluminium hydride gave chroman-4-ols (2-gem dimethyl-T) (4). Dehydration of 4 furnished 2,2-dimethyl- chromenes- (2-gem dimethyl-T) (5). Starting with appropriate acetophenones and acetone-T, precocene I (7-methoxy-2,2-dimethylchromene) and precocene II (6, 7-dimethoxy-2, 2-dimethylchromene) labelled with tritium in the 2-gemdimethyl positions, have been synthesised in high chemical as well as radiochemical yields.

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1980

Journal Article

K. A. V. David, Apte, S. K., Banerji, A., and Thomas, J., “Acetylene reduction assay for nitrogenase activity: gas chromatographic determination of ethylene per sample in less than one minute”, Applied and environmental microbiology, vol. 39, pp. 1078–1080, 1980.[Abstract]


Ammoniacal silver nitrate (10 mg/ml) was added to terminate acetylene reduction assays used to measure nitrogenase activity. Silver nitrate quantitatively precipitated acetylene as the carbide salt, but did not affect the ethylene formed. The vials containing ethylene can be analyzed gas chromatographically at the rate of about 13 samples in 10 min

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1980

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Goomer, N. C., and Kalena, G. P., “Synthesis of 2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy crotonophenone – A new class of natural products form Dysophilla stella”, Synth. Commun., vol. 10, p. 851, 1980.

1980

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Kalena, G. P., “A new synthesis of organic trisulfides”, Tetrahedron Letters, vol. 21, pp. 3003–3004, 1980.[Abstract]


Thiols react with diimidazolylsulfide under mild conditions to give symmetrical trisulfides in good yield and high purity.

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1980

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Goomer, N. C., and Kalena, G. P., “Synthesis of 2-Hydroxy-4, 6-Dimethoxycrotonophenone A New Class of Natural Products from Dysophylla Stellata Benth”, Synthetic Communications, vol. 10, pp. 851–856, 1980.[Abstract]


2-Hydroxy-4, 6-dimethoxycrotonophenone (1), isolated from the plant Dysophylla stellata Benth. by Joshi and Ravindranath,1 is the only example of an open chain form of chromanones. The co-occurrence of the crotonophenone (1) with chromone and butyrophenone1 suggests that these are biogenetically related in the same way as chalcones are to flavonoids.2 It is likely that more crotono-phenones and 2-methylchromanones will be discovered in nature.

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1980

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “A new synthesis of flavones”, Synthesis, vol. 1980, pp. 874–875, 1980.

1979

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Goomer, N. C., “Enolates of o-hydroxyacetophenones: novel synthesis of 2, 2-dialkyl-4-chromanones”, Tetrahedron Letters, vol. 20, pp. 3685–3686, 1979.

1974

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Ramakrishnan, G., and Chadha, M. S., “Onitin and onitisin, new phenolic pterosins from the fern onychiumauratum”, Tetrahedron letters, vol. 15, pp. 1369–1370, 1974.

1974

Journal Article

C. MS, ,, and Banerji, A., “Chalcones from Onychium auratum”, Phytochemistry, vol. 13, pp. 2317–2318, 1974.

1972

Journal Article

A. T. Sipahimalani, Banerji, A., and Chadha, M. S., “Biosynthesis and interconversion of phytoecdysones in Sesuvium portulacastrum L.”, Journal of the Chemical Society, Chemical Communications, pp. 692–693, 1972.[Abstract]


Incorporation of mevalonic acid and cholesterol into ecdysone and ecdysterone and conversion of ecdysone into ecdysterone in the plant, Sesuvium portulacastrum L., have been demonstrated.

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1971

Journal Article

S. V. Amonkar and Banerji, A., “Isolation and characterization of larvicidal principle of garlic”, Science, vol. 174, pp. 1343–1344, 1971.[Abstract]


The larvicidal principles of garlic, Allium sativum L.,have been isolated and identified as diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide. Both natural and synthetic samples of these larvicides are fatal at 5 parts per million to Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say.

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1971

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Chintalwar, G. J., Joshi, N. K., and Chadha, M. S., “Isolation of ecdysterone from Indian plants”, Phytochemistry, vol. 10, pp. 2225–2226, 1971.[Abstract]


Ecdysterone has been isolated from the following plants: Achyranthes aspera, Gomphrena celosioides, Trianthema portulacastrum and Sesuvium portulacastrum, the latter being one of the best sources for ecdysterone.

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1971

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Chintalwar, G. J., “Phytoecdysones & a new flavonol glycoside from Sesuvium portulacastrum Linn”, Indian journal of chemistry, vol. 9, pp. 1029-1030, 1971.

1970

Journal Article

A. Banerji and Chadha, M. S., “Insect moulting hormone from Achyranthes aspera”, Phytochemistry, vol. 9, p. 1671, 1970.

1969

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Chadha, M. S., and Malshet, V. G., “Isolation of 5-hydroxy-3, 6, 7, 3′, 4′-pentamethoxy flavone from Vitex negundo”, Phytochemistry, vol. 8, pp. 511–512, 1969.[Abstract]


5-Hydroxy-3,6,7,3′,4′-pentamethoxylflavone has been isolated from the leaves of Vitex negundo.

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1969

Journal Article

S. R. Udupa, Banerji, A., and Chadha, M. S., “Microbiological transformations of flavonoids—II”, Tetrahedron, vol. 25, pp. 5415–5419, 1969.[Abstract]


From the incubation of (±) flavanone (I) with Gibberella fujikuroi a number of products viz. (−) flavan-4α-ol (II), 2′-hydroxychalcone (III), 2′,4-dihydroxydihydrochalcone (IV), 2′,4-dihydroxychalcone (V), (±) 4′-hydroxyflavanone (VI) and (−) 4′-hydroxyflavan-4α-ol (VII) have been isolated and characterized.

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1968

Journal Article

C. P. Bahl, Banerji, A., and Seshadri, T. R., “Chemical Investigation on some Indian Medicinal Plants”, Current Science, vol. 37, p. 1, 1968.

1967

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Murti, V. V. S., and Seshadri, T. R., “A note on Tectorigenin Monomethyl Ethers ”, Current Science, vol. 36, p. 69, 1967.

1966

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Murti, V. V. S., and Seshadri, T. R., “Isolation of Sissotrin, A New Isoflavone Glycoside from the leaves of Dalbergia sissoo”, Indian Journal of Cheistry, vol. 4, p. 70, 1966.

1965

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Murti, V. V. S., and Seshadri, T. R., “Occurrence of 7,4’-dimethyltectorigenin in the flowers of the Dalbergia sissoo”, Current Science, vol. 34, 1965.

1963

Journal Article

A. Banerji, Murti, V. V. S., Seshadri, T. R., and Thakur, R. S., “Chemical Components of Flowers of Dalbergia sissoo: Isolation of 7-methyltectorgenin, a new Isoflavone”, Indian Journal of Chemistry, vol. 1, p. 25, 1963.

Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2014

Book Chapter

Pandurangan Nanjan, Bose, C., Singh, V., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Isolation, Characterization and Chemical Fingerprinting of Bioactives from Indian Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.) Species”, in Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.) : A Multipurpose Wonder Plant : Vol. IV: Emerging Trends in Research and Technologies, vol. 4, 2014, p. 262.

2009

Book Chapter

K. P. Suja, Banerji, A., and Kumar, K. S. Pradeep, “Phytochemical Investigation on Indian Seabuckthorn”, in Seabuckthorn Hippophae Spp.: The Golden Bush, Eds.S. K. Dwivedi,T. Parimelazhagan, Shashi Bala Singh, Z. Ahmed, New Delhi: Satish Serial Publishing House, 2009, p. 153.

2007

Book Chapter

A. Banerji, “Phytotechnology-value addition to Biodiversity”, in Herbal Technology: Recent Trends and Prospects, Ed. M. Daneill, vol. 9, New Delhi: Scientific Publications, 2007.

2002

Book Chapter

K. S. Nair, Trivedy, K., Rele, S., Chintalwar, G. J., Chinya, P. K., Datta, R. K., and Banerji, A., “Ecdysteroids from Sesuvium portulacastrum for synchronization of cocoon spinning in silk-worm, Bombyx mori L.”, in Adv. Sericulture Res., Ed. S.B. Dandin and V.P. Gupta, Central Sericulture Research and Training Institute, Mysore: , 2002, p. 247.

1997

Book Chapter

K. B. Sainis, Sumariwalla, P. F., Goel, A., Chintalwar, G. J., Sipahimalani, A. T., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Immunomodulatory properties of stem extracts of Tinospora cordifolia: cell targets and active principles”, in Immunomodulation, Ed. S.N. Upadhyay, New Delhi: Narosa Publishing House, 1997, p. 155.

1997

Book Chapter

P. Pradhan, Kalena, G. P., and Banerji, A., “Novel Multicyclic Compounds via Intramolecular Arene-Alkene Photocycloadditions”, in New Horizones in Organic Synthesis, (eds. V. Nair and S. Kumar), , New Age International, 1997, p. 236.

1996

Book Chapter

A. Banerji, “Role of Allelochemicals in the Ecodynamics of Insects and Plants”, in Biotechnological perspectives in chemical ecology of insects, ed. T. N. Ananthakrishnan, New Delhi: Oxford & IBH Publishing, 1996.

1993

Book Chapter

A. Banerji, “Plants – Renewable Source of Bioactive Compounds”, in Himalayan Diversity: Conservation Strategies, Ed. U. Dhar, Nainital: Gyanodaya Prakashan, 1993.

1991

Book Chapter

A. Banerji, “Insect control by biotechnical procedures – Lessons from plant kingdom”, in Insect Chemical Ecology (Ed. I. Hrdy), Academia Praha, 1991, p. 235.

1988

Book Chapter

N. K. Joshi, Lathika, K. M., Banerji, A., and Chadha, M. S., “Effects of Plumbagin on Prothoracic glands of Dysdercus cingulatus”, in Endocrinological Frontiers in Physiological Insect Ecology (Eds. F. Sehnal, A. Zabra and D.L. Denglinger), Technical University Press, Wroclaw (Poland), 1988, p. 69.

1977

Book Chapter

A. Banerji, “Application of carbon-13 in the Biosynthesis of Fusicoccin”, in Stable Isotopes in the Life Sciences, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1977, p. 131.

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2013

Conference Paper

Pandurangan Nanjan, Bose, C., Schrenk, W., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Value addition to unutilized Indian plants & plant products”, in 14th Asian Symposium on Medicinal Plants, Karachi, 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

Pandurangan Nanjan, Schrenk, W., Bose, C., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Isolation, Charecterization Of Bioactives From The Indian Seabuckthorn”, in The Sixth Conference Of International Seabuckthorn Association, Potsdam2013, Germany ISA , 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

A. Madhavan, S, S., Bose, C., and Pandurangan Nanjan, “Screening, Production, Purification and Application of Naringenase Elaborated by Aspergillus Species of Section Nigri”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kollam, Kerala, 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

C. Bose and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Bioactive Compounds from Underutilized Plants and Plant Products”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications.Elsevier, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kollam, Kerala, India, 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

C. M. Sreejit, Kuthannur, S., Bose, C., P, T. Mathew, and Banerji, A., “Application Of Indigenous Growth Regulators In Sericulture - A Field Study In Palakkad District, Kerala”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications.Elsevier, 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

A. Madhavan, S, S., Bos, C., and Pandurangan, N., “Screening, Production, Purification and Application of Naringenase Elaborated by Aspergillus Species of Section Nilgri”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kollam, Kerala, India, 2013.

2012

Conference Paper

Pandurangan Nanjan and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Regiospecific Synthesis and Comparative Radical Scavenging Activities of Flavones and Flavonols”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kollam, 2012.

2011

Conference Paper

N. Pandurangan, Banerji, A., and Bose, C., “Isolation and synthesis of Bioactive Flavonols from Indian Seabuckthorn”, in 5th International Seabucktorn Association Conference, Quinghai, 2011.[Abstract]


Isolation, Characterization and synthesis of bioactive flavanols from seabuckthorn. Poster presentation medicinal chemistry in India.

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2011

Conference Paper

C. Bose and Banerji, A., “Standardization of Bioactive Constituents of Seabuckthorn Extracts- Comparitive Phytochemical Study of Hippophaerhamnoides, H. Salicifolia and H. Sinensis”, in National conference on Seabuckthorn: Emerging trends in R&D on health protection and environmental conservation. , Himachal Pradesh krishivishvavidyalaya,Palampur, 2011.

2010

Conference Paper

C. Bose, Pandurangan Nanjan, and Banerji, A., “Finger-Printing Of Secondary Metabolites In Medicinal Plants”, in U.G.C. sponsored National seminar on Medicinal Plants and Pharmacopia, Kollam, 2010.

2010

Conference Paper

Pandurangan Nanjan, Bose, C., and Banerji, A., “Anti-Oxidants from Common Plants”, in U.G.C. sponsored National seminar on Medicinal plants and Pharmacopia., kollam, 2010.

2010

Conference Paper

C. Bose, Pandurangan Nanjan, and Banerji, A., “Isolation and Characterization of Bioactive Constituents of Himalayan (Ladakh) Seabuckthorn”, in National Conference on seabuckthorn : emerging trends in production to consumption, CSK Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University Palampur (H.P.). , 2010.

2009

Conference Paper

C. Bose and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Drug Discovery Through Seabuckthorn Research Invited presentation”, in fourth international Sea-buckthorn association conference (ISA 2009) Seabuckthorn on the way between science and industry interaction, Belokuriha, Russia, 2009.

2001

Conference Paper

B. S. Patro, Samuel, R., Sreekanth, A., Dwivedi, S. K., Chaurasia, O. P., Chattopadhyay, S., Singh, B., and Banerji, A., “Anti-oxygenic Activity of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) Intn”, in Workshop on seabuckthorn, New Delhi, 2001.

1997

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Natural Product in Drug Industry (Invited Lecture)”, in Symposium on Contributions of Science and Technology in economic progress, National Institute of Oceanography, Panaji, Goa, 1997.

1997

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Emerging Trends in Natural Product Research (Invited Lecture)”, in Symposium on Recent Developments in Natural Products, School of Chemistry, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, 1997.

1997

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Changing Strategies in Natural Product Research (Invited Lecture)”, in Symposium on Natural Product and Drug Development, Department of Chemistry, University College of Science, Calcutta University, Calcutta, 1997.

1997

Conference Paper

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Potential of Plants for Human Needs (Invited Lecture)”, University of Bomaby, Mumbai, 1997.

1996

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “New Approaches to Insect Control (Plenary Lecture)”, in Golden Jubilee Celebration, Dr. H.S. Gour University, Sagar, 1996.

1996

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Pimpinella monoica - A Source of Bioactive Compounds (Plenary Lecture)”, in SAREC International Symposium on Bioactive Natural Products, University of Peradeniya, SriLanka, 1996.

1996

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Changing Strategies towards Natural Product Research - Prospects for Biotechnology”, in 48th Indian Pharmaceutical Congress, Chennai, 1996.

1995

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Natural Product Research in New Perspectives (Invited Lecture)”, in Professor R.H. Sahasrabudhey Lecture Series, Nagpur University, Nagpur , 1995.

1994

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Novel Natural Products from Pimpinella monoica (Invited Lecture)”, in International Symposium on Bioorganic Chemistry, Delhi, 1994.

1991

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Natural product research in new perspective”, in 2nd KOSEF-INSA Joint Seminar on Natural Product Chemistry, Seoul, Korea., 1991.

1991

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, Deshpande, A. D., Luthria, D. L., and Pradhan, P., “2D-NMR Spectroscopy in Structure Elucidation of Natural Products (Invited Speaker)”, in International symposium on Natural Product Chemistry, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, 1991.

1991

Conference Paper

A. Banerji and Nayak, S. K., “New Synthetic Applications of Low Valent Titanium Reagents”, in Twelfth International Symposium, Synthesis of Organic Chemistry, Cambridge, UK , 1991.

1990

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Biotechnical potential of natural products (Invited Speaker)”, in Seaweed research and utilization meeting, Presidency College, Madras, 1990.

1989

Conference Paper

N. K. Joshi, Lathika, K. M., Ramakrishnan, V., Banerji, A., and Chadha, M. S., “Plumbagin-induced inhibition on ovary development in Dysdercus cingulatus”, in Regulation of insect reproduction IV: proceedings of a symposium held in Zinkovy, September 1987/edited by Martin Tonner, Tomas Soldan, Blanka Bennettova, 1989.

1989

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Mass spectrometry in tracer studies”, in Workshop on applications of mass spectrometry to organic chemistry & Biosciences, DRDO, Gwalior, 1989.

1986

Conference Paper

M. S. Chadha, Lathika, K. M., Joshi, N. K., and Banerji, A., “Biological Effects of Plumbagin on red cotton bug, Dysdercus koenigii.”, in Sixth International Con¬gress of Pesticide Chemistry, IUPAC, Ottawa, Canada, 1986.

1985

Conference Paper

A. Banerji and Chintalwar, G. J., “Role of Amino Acids in Terpenoid Biosynthesis”, in Third International Conf. on Chemistry and Biotechnology of Biologically Active Natural Products, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, 1985.

1981

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Use of stable isotopes in Biosynthesis”, in Symposium on Biosynthesis,Chance & Design, Banaras Hindu University, 1981.

1979

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, “Use of multiple labelled precursors in biosynthesis”, in Symposium on “Recent Developments in Organic Chemistry", Calcutta University, 1979.

1975

Conference Paper

A. Banerji, Barton, D. H. R., Mellows, G., and Sim, K. Y., “Convenient synthesis of multi-labelled mevalonic acids”, in The Symposium on Isoprenoids: Chemistry and Aplications, Malti-Chem. Research Centre, Nandsari, Baroda , 1975.

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2012

Conference Proceedings

Pandurangan Nanjan, Bose, C., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Synthesis and Antioxigenic Activities of Seabuckthorn and analogs flavones-3- ols”, National seminar on M odern trends in organic chemistry. Dept of Chemistry, Baselius College, Kottayam , 2012.

2011

Conference Proceedings

C. Bose, Pandurangan Nanjan, and Banerji, A., “Isolation, Characterization and synthesis of Bioactive flavanols from seabuckthorn”, Poster presentation Medicinal chemistry in India. Med chem. Congress. NIPER/IICT,Hyderabad, India, 2011.

2011

Conference Proceedings

S. C.M., Bose, C., Pandurangan Nanjan, P., T. Mathew, and Banerji, A., “Bioprospection of Kerala flora for Phytoecdysoids : Value addition to biodiversity”, National symposium on Innovative and modern technologies for agricultural productivity, food security and environmental management . The society for applied biotechnology, Mangalore, Karnataka, 2011.

2011

Conference Proceedings

C. Bose and Banerji, A., “Comparitive Study Of Chemical Components Of HippophaeRhamnoides And H.Salicifolia”, National symposium on Innovative and modern technologies for agricultural productivity, food security and environmental management . The society for applied biotechnology, Mangalore, Karnataka. , 2011.

2010

Conference Proceedings

O. A, Bose, C., A, B., and B, N., “Phytoecdysterone Mediated Potentiation of Wound Healing in Vitro: Possible Role for Nitric Oxide”, 79th SBCI meeting. IISc, Bangalore, 2010.

2007

Conference Proceedings

A. K. Thasni, Nair, R. S., Rojini, G., Ratheeshkumar, T., Gopal, S., Banerji, A., and Srinivas, P., “Naphthaquinones-Promising anticancer agents against breast and ovarian cancers”, Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 106. Springer 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013 USA, 2007.

2007

Conference Proceedings

K. A. Tashni, Rojini, G., Srinivas, G., Banerji, A., and Srinivas, P., “Molecular mechanism of action of plumbagin in BRCA1 blocked ovarian cancer cell line by suppression subtractive hybridization and micro array”, Annals of Oncology, vol. 18. Oxford Univ Press Great Clarendon St, Oxford OX2 6DP, England, 2007.

2007

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Asoke Banerji, Sumitra, T. V., and Bose, C., “Polar Constituents of Himalayan (Ladakh) Seabuckthorn leaves”, Proceedings of the 3rd International Seabuckthorn Association Conference, Ed. D. B. McKenzie. Laval University, Quebeck, Canada, p. 119, 2007.

1994

Conference Proceedings

D. L. Luthria and Banerji, A., “Biosynthesis of furanochromones inPimpinella monoica”, Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences-Chemical Sciences, vol. 106. Springer, pp. 1149-1156 , 1994.[Abstract]


During a search for bioactive compounds from indigenous plants,Pimpinella monoica (Umbelliferae) was found to contain furocoumarin, isopimpenellin (3) and five biogenetically related furocoumarins viz khellin (1), visnagin (2), visamminol (4), ammiol (5) and khellol (6). Labelled (i) and (2) were isolated from [1−14C]- and [2−14C]-acetates. Labelling pattern, determined by degradation of biosynthesised compounds, establishes the polyketide origin of their aromatic and pyrone rings while the furan ring originates via an acetate-mevalonate pathway. The plant also utilises glycine and leucine as substratevia acetate. Biotransformation of [3−3H]-visnagin to (6) but not to (2) was also observed.

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1990

Conference Proceedings

A. Banerji, Chintalwar, G. J., and Luthria, L., “Biosynthesis of Furochromones inPimpinella monoica: Synthesis and in vivo tranformation of 3H-Visnagin”, 17th IUPAC International Symposium on the Chemistry of Natural Products. New Delhi, 1990.

1989

Conference Proceedings

A. Banerji, “Radiosynthesis of 35S-Labelled Bioactive Compounds and their Metabolics”, National symposium on nuclear techniques in the study of pesticides in food agriculture and environment. The University of Acultural Science, Hebbal, Bangalore , 1989.

1988

Conference Proceedings

N. K. Joshi, Lathika, K. M., Banerji, A., and Chadha, M. S., “Effect of plumbagin on Growth and Development of Red Cotton Bug, Dydercus Koenigii”, vol. B54. Proc. Indian Natn. Sci. Acad., p. 43, 1988.[Abstract]


Topical application of I to 4 micro-g of plumbagin, a napthoquinone from Plumbago zeylanica to the newly moulted 5th instar nymphs of Dysdercus cingulatus retarded growth and delayed metamorphosis in a dose-dependent manner. Metamorphosed adults possessed deformed wings. Treatment of the nymphs with higher doses of plumbagin inhibited moulting. Prothoracic gland cells of such insects were selectively stained blue-black. These observations suggest that plumbagin interferes with the function of prothoracic glands.

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Publication Type: Patent

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2008

Patent

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “A process for obtaining Phytoecdysteroid rich extract”, 2008.

1998

Patent

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Process for the Preparation of an Activated Titanium Reagent for Synthesis”, 1998.

1998

Patent

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “A Process for the Preparation of an Immunomodulator from the Ayurvedic Medicinal Plant, Gulvel (Tinospora sp.) ”, 1998.

1975

Patent

Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Preparation of Insecticidal Principles of Garlic”, 1975.

Publication Type: Report

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

1994

Report

A. Banerji, Deshingkar, D. S., Chitnis, R. R., Wattal, P. K., Theyyunni, T. K., Nair, M. K. T., Ramanujam, A., Dhami, P. S., Gopalakrishnan, V., Rao, M. K., Mathur, J. N., Murali, M. S., Iyer, R. H., and Badheka, L. P., “Partitioning of actinides from Stimulated high level waste arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuels: Counter Current extracts on studies using CMPO”, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, BARC/1994/E/014, 1994.[Abstract]


High level wastes (HLW) arising from reprocessing of pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) fuels contain actinides like
neptunium, americium and curium which are not extracted in the Pure:< process. They also contain small quantities of uranium and plutonium in addition to fission products. Removal of these actinides prior to vitrification of HLW can effectively reduce the active surveillance period of final waste form. Counter current studies using indigenously synthesised octyl (phonyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide <CMP0) were taken up as a follow up of successful runs with simulated sulphate bearing low acid HLW solutions. The simulated HLW arsing from reprocessing of PHWR fuel was prepared based on presumed burnup of 6500 MWd/Te of uranium, 3 years cooling period and 800 litres of waste generation per tonne of fuel reprocessed. The alpha activity of the HLW raffinate after extraction with the CMPO - TBP mixture could be brought down to near background level.

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1993

Report

A. Ramanujan, Banerji, A., Dhami, P. S., Gopalakrishnan, V., Rao, M. K., Mathur, J. N., Murali, M. S., Iyer, R. H., and Badheka, L. P., “Application of Extraction Chromatographic Technique in the Recovery of Antinides from Purex Waste Solutions Using CMPO”, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, BARC/1993/E/024, 1993.[Abstract]


Extraction chramatagraphic technique using CMPO absorbed on chromosorb-102 (CAC) has been developed as a potential alternative to the TRUEX process, where CMPO has been deployed as the extracting agent to recover minor actinides from the high active waste solution of Pure:< origin. In this connection, the batch-wise uptake behaviour of U(VI), Pu(VI), Am(III), Eu(III), Zr<IV), Fe<III>, Ru<III) and TcO+ from nitric acid medium by CAC has been studied. The uptake of actinides and lanthanides are higher than those of other fission products and inert materials. The batch wise loading experiments in presence of Nd(III) / U<VI) have shown that at lower concentration of these metal ions, the uptake of PU(IV), U(VI) and Am(III) are reasonably high. Studies on loading of Nd(III), U<VI> and Pu<IV> on a column containing 1.7 g CAC have shown that Nd(III) (30 mg) and U<VI> (90 mg) could be loaded, while Pu(IV) (**• 0.6 mg) was loaded on a small column containing 100 mg CAC without any breakthrough. Further, a synthetic HAW solution and the actual Purex HAW solution were loaded on a CAC column. The effluents did not contain any alpha activity above the back ground level. The activities could subsequently be eluted with 0.04 M HN03 (Am & RE), 0.01 M oxalic acid (Pu) and 0.25 M Na2CO3 solution (U(VD). The recoveries of these metal ions were found to be > 99%. The eluted Am and rare earth fraction is an important source for Pm. This process is amenable for further scaling up.

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Publication Type: Book

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

1988

Book

A. Banerji, Alternate strategies of insect control: natural products as potential biocides. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, 1988.

Publication Type: Thesis

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

1975

Thesis

A. Banerji, “Studies on Biosynthesis of Fusicoccin: A Thesis”, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London, 1975.

1964

Thesis

A. Banerji, “Structural Studies of Certain Naturally Occurring Flavonoids and Use of Flavonoids as Antioxidants”, Delhi University, Delhi, 1964.

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