Qualification: 
Ph.D, B-Tech
ak_sharma@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma currently serves as Assistant Professor (Sr.Gr.) at the department of Civil Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, Coimbatore campus. He successfully defended his PhD in Geotechnical Engineering in 2015 from Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India.

Experience

YEAR AFFILIATION
February 5, 2015 – December 15, 2015 Assistant Professor, SOA University in Bhubaneswar

Technical Skill Asset

  • FLAC, PLAXIS, MATLAB

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2018

Journal Article

Sreekesh U. Menon, Anand K.B., and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Performance evaluation of alkali-activated coal-ash aggregate in concrete”, Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management, vol. 171, no. 1, pp. 4-13, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper discusses the utilisation of coal-ash (CA) mixtures (bottom ash (BA) and fly ash (FA)) as aggregates for concrete. An optimised mix of BA to FA of 60:40 could produce a basic dense mix of CA suited for aggregates. The aggregates were prepared by pelletisation followed by cold bonding, using the optimised mix blended with cement as a binder. The influence of chemical activators – namely, sodium sulfate and calcium hydroxide – for enhancing, respectively, the reactivity of the CA mix and the pelletisation efficiency was explored in the study. For comparison, two types of aggregates were produced with a higher proportion of either BA or FA. Aggregates were tested for physical and mechanical properties; microstructural and mineralogical aspects were explained through scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The performance of CA aggregate concrete and normal concrete were investigated using compressive strength testing. The curing sensitivity of CA aggregate concrete was assessed under different curing regimes – namely, water, air and sealed.

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Sudhakaran, S. P., and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Soil Stabilization Using Bottom Ash and Areca Fiber: Experimental Investigations and Reliability Analysis”, Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering (ASCE) , vol. 30, no. 8, 2018.[Abstract]


The rapid development of urban areas and the increase in construction activities have resulted in a scarcity of land with favorable soil conditions, necessitating the use of locally available weak soils for construction activities through stabilization techniques. This study introduces a new material, areca fiber, and its suitability as soil reinforcement. Although areca is available abundantly in many parts of the world, its application in geotechnical engineering has not been explored. In the present study, bottom ash (BA) is used as a stabilizing agent, and the suitability of natural areca fiber as reinforcement is demonstrated through detailed experimental investigations and reliability analysis. The test method includes compaction tests, unconfined compression strength (UCS) tests, California bearing ratio (CBR) tests, and split tensile strength tests. The BA content was varied from 0 to 40%, the fiber content was varied from 0 to 1.5%, and the corresponding performance assessment was done. A small amount of cement (3%) was also added to improve the pozzolanic reaction. The UCS and split tensile strength tests were conducted on samples at different curing periods with a maximum curing for 90 days, whereas CBR tests were conducted after 7 days of curing for both soaked and unsoaked conditions. There was considerable increase in UCS, CBR, and split tensile strength of the soil with addition of BA, and the strength values increased tremendously in the presence of areca fiber. Mineralogical and microstructural studies were conducted on the stabilized soil sample using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. These results confirmed the formation of cementitious compounds in the XRD patterns and showed development of dense matrix in the SEM images. The performance of the modified subgrade soil was validated using a reliability approach, which found that the soil subgrade with BA and areca fiber can certainly be used as pavement material for low-volume applications.

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Raju S, and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Studies on Strength Behavior of Subgrade Soil mixed with Sand Manufacturing Dust and Fiber”, Journal of GeoEngineering, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 79-84, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper introduces the potential of sand manufacturing dust (SMD), generated during the production of manufactured sand, in pavement applications. An attempt has been done to improve the subgrade properties of weak soil, with the addition of SMD and along with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers. The introduction of new materials, the design of experiments, further analysis and interpretation from the research content of this manuscript. The optimum percentage of SMD and the PVA fiber to be added to the soil for better performance of subgrade is estimated and their suitability for use in pavement construction has been demonstrated. It was observed that addition of 10% of SMD to the soil performed better in terms of California bearing ratio (CBR). A series of tests were conducted with 10% SMD, 3% cement and varying percentages of fiber (0, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%). The performance has been evaluated in terms of CBR, unconfined compression strength (UCS) tests, split tensile tests and cyclic triaxial test. The test results indicated that the soil stabilized with SMD and PVA fibers performs better under both static and dynamic loadings. The improvement in strength with suggested modifications was found to be very significant (up to 50-fold increase).

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2018

Journal Article

N. Dave, Misra, A. K., Srivastava, A., Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, and Kaushik, S. K., “Green quaternary concrete composites: Characterization and evaluation of the mechanical properties”, Structural Concrete (Wiley Online Journal), vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 1280-1289, 2018.[Abstract]


Industrial byproducts such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS), metakaolin (MK), and lime powder (LP), popularly known as supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), have been extensively used in the manufacturing of cement and cement products in binary and ternary modes. In the present study, attempt has been made to develop a new sustainable green quaternary binder by partially replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC) with different percentages of SCMs and find the optimum mix that can provide the best results in terms of mechanical as well as durability properties. The motivation is to reduce our dependency on OPC to reduce carbon foot print and utilizing these industrial byproducts for the sustainable development. Different compositions of quaternary binders were prepared and their physical, mechanical, and durability properties were studied and compared with the OPC and binary cement product pozzolanic Portland cement (PPC). The mechanical properties of concrete prepared with these OPC, PPC, and quaternary binders were also studied and it is established that the concrete mixtures prepared with quaternary binders provided better results and proved to be more economical. It is concluded that quaternary binders (a) OPC70%+FA15%+SF7.5%+GGBS7.5%, (b) OPC70%+FA15%+SF7.5%+MK7.5%, (c) 50%OPC+30%FA+10%SF+10%GGBS, and (d) 50%OPC+30%FA+10%SF+10%MK have produced relatively better strength, improved durability, and resistance to sulfate attack. These findings were also supported with the microstructural studies of hardened concrete of M20 grade using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). © 2018 fib. International Federation for Structural Concrete.

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2018

Journal Article

Saranya Raj S, Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, and K. B. Anand, “Performance appraisal of coal ash stabilized rammed earth”, Journal of Building Engineering, vol. 18, pp. 51-57, 2018.[Abstract]


Rammed earth construction is an ancient technique which when combined with modern methods could bring substantial improvement in the construction of buildings. This paper presents a study on the strength and durability aspects of coal ash stabilized rammed earth intensifying on the utilization of industrial waste for a sustainable method of construction. At first, compaction studies were done with different combinations of bottom ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) mixtures to obtain an optimum content for use as binder. The optimized amount of binder was then added to soil in varying proportions along with cement to determine the compaction behavior. From the compaction results, 30% of binder content was proposed for stabilization of the rammed earth and all the further studies were carried out by adding this amount of binder. Unconfined compressive strength of the stabilized soil was determined after 7, 14, 28, 45 and 60 days which showed significant improvement in comparison to the pure soil. Microstructural and mineralogical studies were done to affirm the strength test results and to determine the effect of binders on soil stabilization. Compression tests on stabilized rammed earth were also conducted using large cylinders and masonry prisms after 28 days of curing. Durability of the stabilized soil was assessed through spray erosion test which showed their effectiveness in resistance to erosion. Coal ash stabilized soil showed promising results for their utilization in rammed earth construction. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

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2017

Journal Article

N. Dave, Misra, A. Kumar, Srivastava, A., Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, and Kaushik, S. Kumar, “Study on quaternary concrete micro-structure, strength, durability considering the influence of multi-factors”, Construction and Building Materials, vol. 139, pp. 447 - 457, 2017.[Abstract]


Experimental study on the effect of mechanical behavior of quaternary binders, prepared using various supplementary cementitious materials was performed. Fly ash (FA), Ground Granulated Blast furnace Slag (GGBS), Metakaolin (MK) and Silica Fume (SF) were blended in pre-determines proportions by replacing 30–50% of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) by weight. The water/binder ratio and total cementitious materials for pre-decided \{M40\} grade quaternary mix were kept constant for all mixes at 0.40 and 440 kg/m3, respectively. Tests were carried out to characterize the mechanical behavior of quaternary blended concretes at 7, 28, 56, 90, 180 and 365 days and results obtained were compared with the corresponding values obtained for controlled concrete (100% OPC) as well as binary mixes (70% OPC:30% \{FA\} and 50% OPC: 50% FA). The entire specimen were prepared, cured and tested as per the Indian standard code of practice. In addition to that durability of the quaternary mix was determined via Rapid Chloride Permeability Test (RCPT) and sulfate attack test. The synergistic action of the cement with the addition of supplementary cementitious materials has a positive effect vis-a-vis the durability and in few combinations of mixes strength of the concrete with quaternary binders was found better than that of the controlled and binary mix concrete. Based on the test results, optimum mixes of FA, \{SF\} and GGBS/MK as partial replacement to the \{OPC\} as quaternary binder would be a better option compare to 100% controlled concrete. More »»

2017

Journal Article

V. Sahu, Srivastava, A., Misra, A. K., and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Synthesis and characterization of green composites: Focus on accelerated strength, ductility and durability”, Indoor and Built Environment, pp. 1-15, 2017.[Abstract]


High strength green composite material has been developed by this project by addition of lime sludge in stabilized class F fly ash with commercial lime and gypsum. The green composite material was shown to have high UCS (unconfined compressive strength) and good California Bearing Ratio (CBR) values to provide sufficient factor of safety as required by the standard code of practice for use in road construction. The good strength is attributed to calcium carbonate in lime sludge, which reacts with pozzolanic products of lime–gypsum stabilized fly ash. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy have illustrated the interaction/reaction between lime sludge and fly ash and development of additional calcium aluminium oxide carbonate hydrate that has improved the strength of the green composite. The addition of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3% (by weight) of short polypropylene (PP) fibre (30 mm size) in the mix has imparted ductility to reduce brittle behaviour. The UCS of 8.1 MPa was achieved with 0.3% fibre in the mix, which is well above the standard requirement. Moreover, durability tests were performed to determine long-term performance. Our overall findings have indicated that the new green composite developed would have good strength, ductility and durability, for construction of flexible pavements. Further research is needed on the long-term field performance for at least one monsoon period before the material can be used with confidence. More »»

2017

Journal Article

Va Sahu, Srivastava, Aa, Misra, A. Ka, and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Stabilization of fly ash and lime sludge composites: Assessment of its performance as base course material”, Archives of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, vol. 17, pp. 475-485, 2017.[Abstract]


In the present study, two potential industrial waste materials, such as, fly ash (FA) and lime sludge (LS) that are generated in bulk quantities and poses environmental hazards were mixed and stabilized using lime (CL) and gypsum (G) in order to make them suitable for use in Civil Engineering construction applications. Different mix proportion of FA and LS stabilized with different % of CL and G were studied and tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS), split tensile strength test (STS) and California bearing ratio (CBR) to check the suitability of prepared composite for construction industries. It is noted that the optimal composition consisted of FA and LS in 1:1 ratio, 12% CL and 1% G content. The composite was also found to be durable with no leaching of heavy metals. Further, the selected composite was further studied for the microstructural development through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to understand the phenomenon of chemical process or reaction and reason for strength gain. The developed composite (50FA + 50LS + 12CL + 1G) is suggested for application as base course layer material in flexible pavements due to its good requisite strength and durability. It is further highlighted that issues of uncertainty in strength and stiffness characteristics of pavement layer materials and its implications on analysis and design of flexible pavements can be studied through reliability based approach in combination with numerical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations. © 2016 Politechnika Wrocławska

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2016

Journal Article

Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma and Sivapullaiah, P. V., “Swelling behaviour of expansive soil treated with fly ash–GGBS based binder”, 2016.[Abstract]


In this article, the potential of a binder developed by admixing fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) to stabilise expansive soils is evaluated. Laboratory tests included determination of free swell index, swell potential and swelling pressure tests of the soil/binder mixtures at different mixing ratio. The test results showed decrease in the swelling behaviour of the soil with increase in binder content. The percent swell–time relationship was observed to fit the hyperbolic curves enabling us to predict the ultimate percent swell from few initial test results. Addition of 1% of lime to the binder showed further improvement in reducing swelling. A good linear relationship is established between percent oedometer swell and modified free swell index (MFSI) for soil/binder mixtures without lime but the same has not been observed in the presence of lime. The compressibility characteristics of the soil/binder mixtures reduced nominally with increase in binder content but in the presence of lime, the compressibility reduced significantly. Binder used in this study has been found to be effective and economic to stabilise expansive soils with lesser amount of chemical additives such as lime. More »»

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma and Sivapullaiah, P. V., “Strength development in fly ash and slag mixtures with lime”, Ground Improvement, ICE (UK). , vol. 169, no. 3, pp. 194-205, 2016.[Abstract]


The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of the joint activation of fly ash, a by-product of thermal power plants, and ground granulated blast-furnace slag, a by-product of steel manufacture, on the unconfined compressive strength of mixtures of the two materials. Laboratory compaction and strength tests were carried out on ash–slag mixtures at different proportions. The strength was found to increase with slag content. However, the specimens consisting of 30 and 40% of slag and cured for 28 d showed higher strength than the individual materials. Additionally, the effect of different percentages of lime on the strength of the fly ash–slag mixtures was investigated. Tremendous increase in strength was observed with the addition of even 2% of lime. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies showed the morphological and mineralogical changes that are associated with strength improvement. This study suggests that properly designed combinations of fly ash–slag–lime can be used as construction materials for infrastructure projects such as structural fills or subgrade and sub-base courses in pavements without requiring large quantities of lime. More »»

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma and Sivapullaiah, P. V., “Ground granulated blast furnace slag amended fly ash as an expansive soil stabilizer”, Soils and Foundations, vol. 56, pp. 205 - 212, 2016.[Abstract]


The potential of using a binder for stabilization of expansive soils that consists of a mixture of fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) is evaluated in this study. The joint use of these two materials to form a binder provides new opportunities to enhance pozzolanic activities that may reduce the swell potential and increase the unconfined compressive strength of expansive clays. The influence of different percentages of binder on the Atterberg limits, compaction characteristics and unconfined compressive strength of an artificially-mixed soil were examined. The addition of binder was shown to bring about a significant improvement in these soil properties. It was found that the liquid limit and plasticity index of the expansive soil decreased considerably with the addition of binder, while the strength improved. Adding a small amount of lime (one percent) further improved the soil properties by enhancing the pozzolanic reactivity of the binder. Based on the results of the unconfined compressive strength tests, the addition of 20% binder is recommended as optimum content. In addition, the mineralogical and morphological studies of soil specimen stabilized with optimum binder content suggested the formation of hydrated particles and cementitious compounds as a result of the reaction between the clay and the binder. Test results indicate that the use of \{GGBS\} mixed fly ash as binder to stabilize expansive is well suited for sustainable construction besides economic benefits. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2017

Conference Paper

H. T. Mohan, L. Masson, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, Monish K, Krishnan, A. G., S. K. Thiviya, and R. Mohan, “Transforming urban waste into construction blocks for a sanitation infrastructure: A step towards addressing rural open defecation”, in 2017 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC), San Jose, CA, USA, 2017, pp. 1-9.[Abstract]


Developing nations like India face major challenges in their developmental efforts due to issues related to waste management and open defecation. While the urban community faces challenges related to plastic waste which has become almost all pervasive, the rural counterpart's open defecation continues to pose significant health threats. Lack of large-scale utilization of plastic from the urban population has been a challenge for civic administrators. The state is same as the rural population in terms of adequate sanitation infrastructure due to the cost of raw materials and lack of skilled workers. This paper discusses a potential solution to address these issues in concern; i.e. transforming urban plastic waste into interlocking construction blocks and then to construct low-cost, rapid build toilets. A study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of using LDPE (Low-Density Polyethylene), HDPE (High-Density Polyethylene) (major sources of waste) with easily procurable materials like sand, rice husk and saw dust, in different proportions to create the interlocking blocks. The study included a comparison of the mechanical and thermal properties of different proportions of raw materials to find the optimum composition. The paper also discusses the design and construction of toilet structure based on the (1) acceptance of the rural community, (2) construction with interlocking bricks method, and (3) availability of resources. The environmental and economic sustainability advantages of the proposed solution with very minimum skills, fewer construction materials, and shorter build time as compared to conventional methods have also been explored in this paper.

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Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2016

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma and Sivapullaiah, P. V., “Compressibility and deformation studies of compacted fly ash/GGBS mixtures”, The 17th Nordic Geotechnical Meeting. Reykjavik, Iceland, pp. 897-903, 2016.

2016

Conference Proceedings

S. Raju, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Modification of Subgrade Properties using Waste Generated from Sand Manufacturing Unit and Fiber”, International Conference on Soil and Environment ICSE 2016. Bangalore, India, 2016.

2016

Conference Proceedings

P. V. Sivapullaiah and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Fly Ash and GGBS Mixtures for Geotechnical and Geo-Environmental Applications”, Geo-Chicago 2016. Chicago, Illinois, pp. 121-130, 2016.[Abstract]


In this study, the joint activation of fly ash/ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) mixtures has been evaluated in order to find its suitability in geotechnical and geo-environmental applications. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests have been conducted on fly ash/GGBS mixtures prepared at their respective optimum moisture content (OMC) and maximum dry density (MDD) and cured for different periods. The mixture consisting of 70% fly ash and 30% GGBS developed better strength than either of the individual materials. Thereafter, 70:30 mix of fly ash and GGBS was selected for use as binder material for the stabilization of contaminated and expansive soils. With a view to stabilize contaminated soil, the adsorption characteristic of lead ions onto the mixture was determined through batch tests conducted at different pH and time intervals. It was found that the removal efficiency of the lead ions by the binder was comparatively high when compared to fly ash alone. The kinetic studies suggested that the reaction involving the adsorption of lead ions followed second-order kinetics. In the stabilization of expansive soil, the results demonstrated improvement in the plasticity characteristics of the expansive soil as well as reduction in the swell potential. Based on the results obtained in this present study, it can be concluded that combined use fly ash and GGBS can be advantageous when compared to using them individually. More »»

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma and Sivapullaiah, P. V., “Improvement of Strength of Expansive Soil with Waste Granulated Blast Furnace Slag”, GeoCongress 2012,March 25-29, 2012 Oakland, California. pp. 3920-3928, 2012.[Abstract]


Utilization of industrial waste materials in the improvement of problematic soils is a cost efficient and also environmental friendly method in the sense that it helps in reducing disposal problems caused by the various industrial wastes. The main objective of the present study is to improve various engineering properties of the soil by using waste material Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) as an alternative to lime or cement, so as to make it capable of taking more loads from the foundation structures. This paper reports the findings of laboratory tests carried out on local Indian expansive black cotton soil with GGBS mixed with the expansive soil in different proportions. The specimens compacted to their respective Proctor's optimum moisture content and dry density (which varied from mixture to mixture) were cured for a period of 7, 14 and 28 days and their unconfined compression strengths were determined. It is observed that the strength improvement depends on the amount of GGBS used and the effect of curing period is less pronounced. Further it was shown that the initial tangent modulus values generally increases with increase in GGBS content More »»

Awards/Achievements/Recognition

  • Paper in Ground Improvement journal has been selected for free preview and download in September 2016 as a part of the India Engineer’s day celebration by ICE (UK)

Invited Lectures/Presentations

  • Sustainability in Geotechnical Engineering”, Workshop on Urban Engineering, Construction Automation & Sustainability (APCRDA),5th Aug, 2017,Vijaywada, AP, India.
  • Sustainable Use of Industrial Waste Materials in Geotechnical Construction”, Southeast Symposium of Recent Developments in Geotechnics, 8th – 9th July, 2017, Nanjing, China