Qualification: 
Ph.D
Email: 
amalendu_jyotishi@blr.amrita.edu

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi has a Ph. D. degree in Economics from Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bengaluru. Prior to joining ASB, he has worked in OHIO University-Christ College Academy where he taught Financial Market Analysis and provided academic guidance to the students in their Internship, Applied Research Projects and Joint Students Consulting Projects (JSCP). He had been to PECS University, Hungary, as a project guide of the students who were involved in JSCP. Before that he worked in a few social sciences research institutes including Gujarat Institute of Development Research. He taught Environmental Economics at CEPT University, Ahmedabad. His research interests cover a wide range of issues relating to institutional economics aspects of agribusiness, water markets, forestry, inland fisheries and livelihood issues in varied ecosystems. He has published his research ideas in journals, edited volumes and working papers. Besides, he has presented several papers in International and National level seminars and acted as reviewer for several journals including Journal of Ecological Economics, Fruits, Voluntas, ICFAI Journal of Applied Finance etc.

Dr. Jyotishi has collaborated in research projects supported by organizations like Swedish International Development Agency, World Bank, International Water Management Institute, Oxfam (GB) Trust, Aga Khan Rural Support Program (India). He is also the recipient of Sir Ratan Tata Trust Fellowship through Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bengaluru. Presently at ASB, he is the Chairperson of the Ph.D. Program of the School and teaches in the area of Economics.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Raichur, S., Hatti, K., and Senthilkumar Thangavelu, “Characteristics of the IT Firms and their implications on Innovation: An Empirical Study of Indian IT Firms”, International Journal of Control Theory and Applications, 2017.[Abstract]


Information Technology (IT) industry in India has been playing a vital role in the growth of the Indian economy and economies of other related countries. IT firms undergo many transformations over the years from an outsourced provider, providing Software Application Development and Maintenance (ADM) and Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) to partnering in business and services to co-innovator. Indian IT firms play critical roles due to sustained competitive cost advantage and availability of highly skilled resources. In the current scenario, Innovation plays a critical role in creating sustained competitive advantages. India is gaining its prominence in the innovation space and many international companies are building their Innovation Centers in India. More »»

2016

Journal Article

S. Madhavan, iv, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, and Dr. P. Balasubramanian, “Planning Fallacy: A Case of Task Planning in IT Project Support Services”, Purushartha: A Journal of Management Ethics and Spirituality, vol. 9, 2016.[Abstract]


Schedule and effort slippages are measures that practitioners in the Information Technology (IT) industry are all too familiar with. While we accept the fact that these slippages are realities of our day-to-day life, we put continual efforts to overcome or reduce the impact of these deviations. Our propensity to lose sense of time-taken and become over optimistic and thereby skew our planning is termed as planning fallacy.

This research is to study the planning errors, the reason for such behavior, its ubiquity in IT industry and how remedial actions may reduce planning errors. The intent is to approach the problem from a behavioral economics point of view, on the irrational approach followed by individuals that lead to planning fallacy. The research methodology adopted was experimental design with random samples chosen as control and treatment group. The results of the study and experiments establish the g presence of planning fallacy in many areas of task planning. Our results on the treatment group demonstrate that this judgment bias could be reduced to a large extent by periodic monitoring and facilitation.

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2016

Journal Article

Sa Vijayakumar, Dr. Deepika M. G., Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, and Dr. Deepa Gupta, “Factors affecting infant mortality rate in India: An analysis of Indian states”, Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 530, pp. 707-719, 2016.[Abstract]


While there are enough efforts by the governments to reduce the infant mortality rate in developing countries, the results are not as desired. India is no exception to the case. Identifying the factors that affect the infant mortality rates would help in better targeting of the programs leading to enhanced efficiency of such programs. Earlier studies have shown the influence of socio economic factors on infant mortality rates at a global level and found that variables like fertility rate, national income, women in labour force, expenditure on health care and female literacy rates influence the infant mortality rates. The current study using the data from Indiastat.com from all states and Union Territories of India for the years 2001 and 2011 tries to establish the relationship between infant mortality rate and some of the above mentioned factors along with a few healthcare infrastructure related variables. Using a regression analysis method we not only identify the influence of the variables on infant mortality, we went a step further in identifying the performance of states and union territories in reducing IMR. The performance was measured using 'technical efficiency' analysis. We then compared the performance and growth rate of IMR to classify the states as good performers and laggards. Our results suggest that most of the major states are on track on their performance on IMR. However, a few small states and union territories like Andaman and Nicobar Island, Mizoram, Arunachal Pradesh as well as Jammu & Kashmir need special attention and targeting to reduce IMR. © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

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2016

Journal Article

R. Bishu and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Management of micro small and medium enterprises in India a study of the regional cultural determinants of entrepreneurial performance”, Global definitions and classifications of MSMEs , 2016.

2015

Journal Article

P. P. Thampi, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, and Bishu, R., “Cultural characteristics of small business entrepreneurs in India: Examining the adequacy of Hofstede's framework”, International Journal of Business and Globalisation, vol. 15, pp. 475-495, 2015.[Abstract]


The functioning of small business or the micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in India has been closely associated with factors unique to the respective regions of the country. Entrepreneurial capability is often associated, among other factors, with the region's cultural environment. Although many theories have come up on the relationship between human behaviours and culture the one promulgated by Geert Hofstede merits maximum attention; it proposes that people differ to the extent to which they endorse six dimensions of cultural values. Since Hofstede used a neutral, global and scientific (Etic) approach in his study, it became necessary to consider an insider's (Emic) perspective in the Indian context. A qualitative survey of experts was undertaken to validate the relevance and adequacy of Hofstede's framework for India which while reviewing the applicability of Hofstede's cultural framework for India came up with yet another cultural dimension as well. More »»

2015

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Informal gold mining in nilgiri-wayanad region of india”, South India Case Study, vol. 09, 2015.

2014

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Sivramkrishna, S., “4 Unearthing the roots of statutory forest law”, Conflict, Negotiations and Natural Resource Management: A Legal Pluralism Perspective from India, 2014.[Abstract]


Across the world, charcoal production for iron smelting has been considered responsible for destroying large tracts of medieval forests, sometimes of entire regions (Sivramkrishna 2009). Did iron smelting also cause such devastation in pre-colonial India? Could this have been one of the earliest reasons for the East India Company to intervene with statutory laws to preserve, conserve and manage forests? Unfortunately, answers to these questions are not unequivocal; however, in attempting to find them we articulate a fundamental change More »»

2013

Journal Article

K. G. Sa Kumar, Thampi, P. Pa, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, and Bishu, Rc, “Toward strategically aligned innovative capability: A QFD-based approach”, Quality Management Journal, vol. 20, pp. 37-50, 2013.[Abstract]


The authors show how to use the house of quality, which is the core of quality function deployment (QFD), to develop strategically aligned innovative capabilities. The proposed framework integrates extant prescriptions and assesses the alignment of innovative capabilities with business-unit innovation strategy using a structured, systematic, and customizable approach. The framework was tested using a sample of software business units in India. Results indicate a good fit of the framework between strategic capability and innovation performance, and between ideation capability and innovation performance. The results suggest that the framework may be very useful to business units that can customize the list of constituent innovative capabilities to the specific characteristics of their industry. More »»

2013

Journal Article

Sa Sivramkrishna and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Unearthing the roots of colonial forest laws: Iron smelting and the state in pre- and early-colonial India”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 48, pp. 39-49, 2013.[Abstract]


This paper repositions iron smelting and the smelter at the centre of a revised narrative of pre- and early-colonial forest history and policy. In a medieval war economy the smelter shared a relationship of mutual interdependence with the feudal state as a provider of critical raw material for weapon manufacture. This, however, changed with the advent of the colonial state, interdependence giving way to competition over resources. It is through this multilayered perspective of environmental and military history intertwined with the anthropology of iron smelting that we can unearth one of the roots of statutory forest laws. More »»

2013

Journal Article

K. G. Satheesh kumar and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Transaction Cost Levelling to Reduce Incumbent’s Difficulty in Innovation: A Heuristic Approach through Critical Review”, International Journal of Knowledge, Innovation and Entrepreneurship , vol. 1, pp. 1-2, 2013.[Abstract]


Research on incumbent’s difficulty in innovation has evolved around frameworks for identifying disruptive, architectural or discontinuous innovation, although it is widely acknowledged that incumbent’s difficulty lies elsewhere, in financial evaluation and resource allocation. We propose an approach, based on transaction cost, to reduce incumbent’s difficulty. We view that incumbents see a differential transaction cost between sustaining and disruptive choices of innovation due to the depressed transaction cost associated with the former and high transaction cost associated with the latter. For a new entrant the differential cost is absent or minimal. We propose, with five postulates, that incumbents should level their transaction costs for different innovation options. These postulates provide useful insights not only regarding the differences between innovation options available to an incumbent, but also about possible vulnerability to disruption. A few methods are suggested to achieve transaction cost levelling. The paper also identifies several opportunities for further research

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2013

Journal Article

Dr. Deepika M. G. and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Assessing risk and risk mitigation strategies of small coffee growers: A study of Kodagu district in Karnataka”, NRPPD Discussions Paper, vol. 21, 2013.[Abstract]


Coffee in India is largely grown in the southern part of the country and involves small growers. Small holding cultivation combined with the external reliance for markets have posed risks to coffee cultivators at different levels. In this context, the paper analyses various risks among the small coffee growers in India through the study conducted in the Kodagu district of Karnataka, the largest coffee growing district in India. The risks that are analysed are classified into farm risk arising due to threat to yield, rising cost of inputs, lack of irrigation and extension services and marketing risks arising due to volatility of prices and the buyer driven supply chain; policy risks arising due to taxation and other regulatory barriers. Among these, the risks stemming from threat of diseases, attack of wild animals, rising labour cost due to shortage of labour, exploitative marketing situations arising due to lack of cooperatives are matters of serious concern and call for urgent policy interventions, which if properly addressed might help in mitigating some of the risks faced by the farmers. To mention some of them, there is an urgent need to enhance the R&D efforts of Coffee Board and Spices Board to address on the kind of pest attack on coffee and other crops in the region. There is a need for transferring the technology at the field level through arriving at efficient extension services. Intervention by forest officials in addressing the problem of wild animals is an immediate requirement. Shortage of labour being the most crucial of the input problems, there is an urgent need to move towards cost effective and crop specific mechanisation. Linking of MNREGS for plantation labour could provide some relief to the problem of labour shortage. A relook into the Plantation Labour Act to make it advantageous to both the farmers and the labourers is called upon to lead to more organised labour market. To address the marketing risks, a seller driven supply chain would be useful in resisting the price related risks associated with the growers. Exploring the possible alternatives in terms of coffee marketing co-operative or local auction market can help creating a seller 5 led supply chain process. The other way to minimise risk would be to promote crop diversification by the existing Boards. From the analysis of diversification at the regional level using secondary information on price and yield, it is visible that coffee and other intercropped commodities have different price and yield cycles, and therefore, diversification of crops would act as a hedge against price and yield risks. It is therefore, important to promote diversification of crops at farm level. Attempts made to address crop related issues by Coffee Board, Spice Board and horticulture department hardly encourages diversification. It is essential that these Boards work in tandem to promote diversification of crops in the region looking into the problems of farmers in totality

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2012

Journal Article

N. Haridas, Kumar, S. Ajith, Nerella, V. Kumar, Deepika, M., and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Measuring technical efficiency in tea plantations in India: A panel data analysis”, no. 132, 2012.

2012

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “When Rebels Become Stakeholders: Democracy, Agency and Social Change in India”, Journal of Social and Economic Development, 2012.[Abstract]


When Rebels become Stakeholders is an interesting title to indulge in the book and then review it. To set the context, the interest was much more intriguing especially because of three speeches the reviewer read even before reading the book. The first one was by Amartya Sen (1) which contextualises the Indian democracy in its historicity. This speech is essentially a gist of his book The Argumentative Indian. The second speech was by Ramachandra Guha given as a part of VKRV Rao memorial lecture at the Institute for

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2012

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Wetland Valuation: A Review of Theoretical and Empirical Issues”, Amrita School of Business, 2012.[Abstract]


Abstract Valuation of wetland has always remained a challenge for the empirical, environmental and ecological economists. Major difficulty confronted in the valuation process is the involvement of non-market variables in these ecosystems. These ecosystems provide a large number of services and goods to the society at large, and therefore valuation of the gains from the system are most needed. In that case the methods of valuation have to be indirect, based on choices and preferences revealed by the stakeholders. More »»

2011

Journal Article

Dr. Deepika M. G. and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Role of third sector in development of drought prone region: Insights from Kachchh, Gujarat”, International NGO Journal, vol. 6, pp. 181–192, 2011.

2011

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Jambunathan, S., and Meera, E., “Technical Efficiency Analysis For Decision Making Process: A Case Study of Air-Conditioner Manufacturing Company”, 2011.

2011

Journal Article

D. Bamber, Phadke, S., and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Product-knowledge, ethnocentrism and purchase intention: COO study in India”, Global Markets and Workforce, 2011.[Abstract]


Purpose – The purpose of this research is to model country of origin (COO) effects, intention to purchase foreign products, ethnocentrism and foreign product knowledge among average Indian consumers. Knowledge derived from the analysis can be used in the marketing mix by firms to address the Indian market.

Design/methodology/approach – The literature concerning COO effect is presented. Four scales are used for intention to purchase foreign products (PI), ethnocentrism (E), foreign product knowledge (FPK) and COO. A principal component analysis for the scale of 21 items is conducted using data from a representative Indian sample. Further, correlation and simple linear regression analyses are conducted to test various hypotheses and models.

Findings – Four components were confirmed that correspond with the sub-scales: PI, E, FPK and COO. Significant correlations between i) PI and E, ii) FPK and PI, iii) FPK and COO and iv) PI and COO were found. Interpretation of correlation along with the results of two regression analyses indicated two consumer segments in the Indian sample.

Research limitations/implications –The research is limited to an average consumer group. Further research will be required to address specific brands, products as well as the attitudes of the specific groups like elite consumers.

Practical implications – The paper indicates a series of strategies that retailers could adopt to address the emerging market of India. The findings have significant implications for domestic and foreign marketers.

Originality/value – The study models the interrelationship between four sub-scales within a 21- item Likert type instrument with reference to a representative consumer group, placed into two segments, in the under-researched market of India.

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2011

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Bedamatta, S., “Indian Agricultural Sector towards Food Security: Some Policy Issues”, 2011.[Abstract]


There has been remarkable achievement by Indian State in agricultural growth trans-forming the economy from a net importer of agricultural products to a net exporter over the decades. Similar remarkable achievements can also be seen in terms of good grain stock and addressing famine like situations. Post Bengal famine, India has not seen a disaster of that magnitude in following decades that can be attributed to phenomenal sensibility and achievement by Indian State. However, these achievements have come with a cost to the society. In recent time, the issues relating to food inaction has led to the debate on the factors behind this. There are several viewpoints that ascribe the char-acteristic and causes of this and hence, the implications on food security issues. Firstly, supply side bottlenecks in terms of stagnated production of food grains are considered as one of the important factors. Secondly, with the increase in income among the rural population (as advocated through the success of MGNREGA programmes) the demand side factors also arguably play important role in increasing the good prices. A third lines argument comes from the systemic bottleneck that leads to inefficiency in bridging the gap between supply and demand. One of the simplest ways to look at inefficiency is wastage. Other factors of inefficiency may also include inefficient market due to many layers of imperfection between the producers and consumers that play a role in escalating the prices and hence accessibility. Besides, degradation of soil and land, unavailability of water, stagnancy in technological growth, diversification are some other crucial viewpoints describing inefficiency in the system. There are some elements of truth in all these viewpoints.

We, therefore, in our paper, intend to understand the agricultural scenario in last few decades to verify the intensity of truth in some of the above mentioned viewpoints. Besides, we would attempt to understand if there are possible policy gaps that can address these issues. Considering all these aspects, in the present paper we are briefly analyzing the overall scenario of agricultural sector, especially from the food security point of view. We will do so by looking at demand side and supply side factors along with the ecological factors, technology, credit and market imperfection. These issues would be synthesized considering the broader agricultural and food policies and gaps therein.

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2011

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Sivramkrishna, S., “The Forest and the Trees: Delineating the Protected Area Debate in India”, The Forest and the Trees: Delineating the Protected Area Debate in India, 2011.[Abstract]


Abstract Protected areas like Reserve Forest, Sanctuaries and National Parks have been created for ecological services that accrue from these forests. However, presence of multiple stakeholders with conflicting interest makes functioning of such Protected Areas a complex system thereby giving rise to different viewpoints based on stakeholder interest. In this review paper, we attempt to understand the Protected Area debate from different stakeholder standpoints and on the basis of a review of literature that more specifically pertains to the More »»

2011

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Amerasinghe, P. H., Archarya, S., Kumar, V., Yadava, C. Basappa Ga, and Deshpande, R. S., “Urban agriculture: a sustainable solution to alleviating urban poverty, addressing the food crisis, and adapting to climate change-Case study, Bangalore, India”, 2011.

2009

Journal Article

S. Sivramkrishna and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “A heuristic analysis of equity and equality in the institutionalisation of property rights: the Baliraja water distribution experiment, India”, International journal of agricultural resources, governance and ecology, no. 8, 2009.[Abstract]


Natural resource management perceived as a search for institutionsthat can ensure simultaneous fulfilment of three goals: productivity (or efficiency), sustainability and equity. In this article, we study the implicationsof pursuing the goal of equity in the management of surface water resources for irrigation with a heuristic model incorporating a Leontief-type fixed productionfunction. The analysis has been carried out in the backdrop of the Balirajawater distribution experiment in India. One suggestion is that the allocatingtradable water rights over water, a common property natural resource, can beused as an instrument to improve equity. Unfortunately, advocating the use of water distribution as an instrument of poverty alleviation is fraught withimplicit assumptions about the rural economy and uncertain outcomes. It isimportant for planners to understand that the concepts of equity and equalityare applicable to inputs and outputs or outcomes. We attempt to understand theimplications of equality in water distribution on social welfare with a simpleheuristic analysis. Theoretical analysis shows the possible outcomes of such a policy and also intended to raise pertinent questions and hypotheses in studyingthe effectiveness of irrigation and watershed initiatives where rights over water have been redistributed equally.

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2008

Journal Article

S. Sivramkrishna and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Monopsonistic exploitation in contract farming: Articulating a strategy for grower cooperation”, Journal of International Development, vol. 20, no. 3, 2008.[Abstract]


Contract farming has been considered a new hope to instil dynamism in third world agriculture. However, there remains serious concern whether small peasants will be able to benefit from this system since buyers may often be a single large or at most, few large corporations, a typical case of monopsony. In this paper we question the basis of the fears that are often raised in the literature. A clear analytical approach to understanding the (economic) meaning of monopsony helps us articulate a strategy for grower cooperation that could effectively deal with monopsony power in contract farming systems.

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2008

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Efficiency of the Small Farm Swidden System: Cases from Orissa”, The IUP Journal of Agricultural Economics, vol. 3, pp. 72-85, 2008.[Abstract]


This study is based on field survey of households involved in Swidden in Orissa, India. Conventionally, swidden agricultural system has been interpreted as inefficient (economically), destructive (ecologically) and an inflexible static form (institutionally) of agriculture. The economic efficiency in swidden, in particular poses an analytical problem, largely due to the institutional structures and multiple crop situations involved in this system. Conventionally, efficiency of farm performance is understood through the ratio of output and inputs wherein productivity per unit of input is the undercurrent of efficiency. In this context, the paper attempts to clarify some of the concepts relating to economic efficiency in swidden agricultural system, measure technical efficiency and identify the key factors affecting efficiency of swidden agricultural system practiced in the region. Results suggest that swidden in particular is not an inefficient form of agriculture, particularly from energy use point of view.

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2007

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Parthasarathy, R., “Reservoir Fisheries Management: Experience of Tawa in Madhya Pradesh”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 42, no. 05, 2007.[Abstract]


In developing economies, open water inland fisheries not only play an important role in the nutrition for the poor, but also provide livelihood for many people engaged in the sector. In the case of reservoir fisheries we identify various types of institutional regimes. The Tawa reservoir in Madhya Pradesh is a classic case that has experienced various management regimes in the last three decades. It provides an ideal opportunity to comprehend the performance of different regimes and their implications for productivity (efficiency criterion), wages and employment (equity criteria) and fingerlings stocking and technology use (resource sustainability criteria) across different regimes. Further, the paper details the management practices under the Tawa Matsya Sangh and emphasises that these practices should be integrated with an understanding of the resource base.

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2006

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Takashi Shinoda (ed). The Other Gujarat: Social Transformations Among Weaker Sections; and Ghanshyam Shah, Mario Rutten and Hein Streefkerk (eds). Development and Deprivation in Gujarat: In Honour of Jan Breman”, Journal of social and economic development, vol. 8, no. 1, p. 85, 2006.

2006

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Institutional Analysis of Swidden: The Case of Swiddners in Orissa”, International Association of Agricultural Economists Conference, 2006.[Abstract]


Right from Neolithic period swidden has been a widespread form of land use that varies in character (Conklin, 1961). It embraces different topography, demographic feature, ethnic and ecological diversities and varies in terms of cropping pattern, frequency of land use, tools and methods of practice. It is argued that the institutions governing swidden are static in nature and do not adapt to the changing ecological and social needs (Jarsoz, 1993; WRI, 1996). Therefore, it is necessary to understand what characterise institutions in a More »»

2005

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Rout, S., “Water Rights in Deccan Region: Insights from Baliraja and Other Water Institutions”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 149-156, 2005.[Abstract]


This paper discusses the prevailing water sharing institutions in the Deccan region. By contrasting the situation with when the Baliraja movement began in the 1980s, in the hope of ensuring an equitable share and sustainable use of water for irrigation, this paper also attempts to understand the feasibility of institutional arrangements for sharing water on an equitable, efficient and sustainable basis. At the present juncture, it does not appear feasible to address all three issues simultaneously. The need rather is to address either the equity-sustainability or equity-efficiency solution. Both require institutional arrangements different from what the Baliraja movement envisioned.

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2005

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Parthasarath, R., “The TAWA Reservoir Fisheries Management: Experiences and Options”, Economic and Political Weekly, 2005.[Abstract]


In developing economies, open water inland fisheries not only plays an important role in the nutrition for the poor, but also provide livelihood for many people engaged in fisheries. Reservoir fisheries assume importance to understand the CPR nature of the resources and requires analytical framework to describe the management of them toward an equitable, efficient and sustainable end. A system, which delivers or ensures these, becomes a reliable response to the institutional requirements in CPR type of resources in general and reservoir fisheries in particular. In the case of reservoir fisheries we identify various types of institutional regimes. Each regime has its advantages and disadvantages in terms of allocation of rights, appropriation of the fish resource and distribution of income. In India, these institutions can be broadly framed into three categories, namely, state, private and cooperative managed regimes. Each regime has diversified activities relating to stocking, production, collection, transportation, marketing and distribution of products, income and profit. These factors are driven by opportunities and uncertainties, though. Madhya Pradesh state has thirty-two medium and five large dams has experienced various management regimes in the last three decades. We could identify and attempt to understand in this paper four different regimes; these include the fisheries department of the state, MPFDC (Madhya Pradesh Fisheries Development Corporation), Co-operative federations and private contractors. The attempt here is to understand functionaries and regimes change in the case of Tawa reservoir in Madhya Pradesh. The analysis contrasts productivity (efficiency criterion), wages and employment (equity criteria) and stocking production and technology use (resource sustainability criteria) across different regimes. Further, the paper details the management practices under the Tawa Matsya Sangh (TMS) and emphasises that management practices should be integrated with the understanding of resource base.

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2004

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Deshpande, R. S., and Hatti, N., “Poverty in India: An Institutional Explanation”, the 18th European Conference on Modern South Asian Studies (SASNET), Lund, SWEDEN, 2004.[Abstract]


The two-fold role of the Indian State as a development catalyst and as an interventionist has long been debated on the count of ease in policy formulation. Institutions in various forms have been constantly shaping the policy from the outside State ambit. On this backdrop the present paper addresses to the analysis of the role of the State as reflected from the nexus between the State policies, interest groups and institutions to reach the consequent steps towards alleviation of poverty. It is pointed out that the role of state in India has changed substantially during the last five decades in perceiving poverty and this is largely due to the institutional interface. The results show positive success during seventies till mid eighties and stagnation thereafter. The paper incorporates discussion on the differential policy impact in a federal context, on different provinces of the Indian federation and the differential changes in poverty across groups, specifically the rural population and the weaker sections of the society. The paper highlights the role of institutions in the poverty alleviation strategy.

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2003

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “OECD proceedings on environmental benefits from agriculture: Issues and policies”, Agricultural Economics Research Review, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 83-85, 2003.[Abstract]


IndianJournals.com - Gateway to access, disperse and preserve knowledge More »»

2002

Journal Article

R. S. Deshpande and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Managing groundwater resource on Deccan Plateau: Pani Panchayat as an institution of collective action”, Institutionalising Common Pool Resources, Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi, 2002.[Abstract]


Irrigation development in India has been under discussion for the last decade and the issues debated cover broadly three aspects. First, the controversy regarding big dams vs. small dams, and the associated environmental cost dominated the central stage. Narmada and Tehri projects offered the necessary empirical base for the debate. Rehabilitation of dam oustees also became a dominant issue during this period (Paranjapye 1988, 1990, Dhawan 1997). Second, the debate also initiated discussion on the alternative development path More »»

2002

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi and Deshpande, R. S., “Land transaction in tribal economies: a study from the scheduled areas of orissa”, 2002.[Abstract]


Structure as well as operation of land market in Less Developed Economies are complex and defy general expectations about the behaviour of market. Our paper on land market is an attempt towards theoretically examining various issues related to the functioning of land market in a tribal economy and empirically identifying it based on a village study in southern Orissa. Critically looking into interim land transaction model of Basu and the ownership uncertainty model of Feder and Feeny we observe that price alone cannot be a sufficient factor to influence the supply of land. We conclude that land market functions mainly form supply side determinants via the intensity of land required by the owner, intensity of fund needed for immediate purpose and aggregate cash outflow.

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2001

Journal Article

R. S. Deshpande and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “The State Policy and Poverty in India: An Understanding in Retrospect”, Document paper of Saskatchewan Institution of Public Ploicy, University of Regina, Canada, 2001.[Abstract]


The two-fold role of the Indian State as a development catalyst and as an interventionist has long been debated on the count of ease in policy formulation. On this backdrop the present paper addresses to the analysis of the role of the State as reflected from the nexus between the State policies, interest groups and consequent steps towards alleviation of poverty to provide social justice. It is pointed out that the role of state in India has changed substantially during the last five decades in perceiving poverty. More »»

2001

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Institutional pluralism: Case of swiddners in Orissa”, Institute for Social and Economic Change, 2001.[Abstract]


The two-fold role of the Indian State as a development catalyst and as an interventionist has long been debated on the count of ease in policy formulation. On this backdrop the present paper addresses to the analysis of the role of the State as reflected from the nexus between the State policies, interest groups and consequent steps towards alleviation of poverty to provide social justice. It is pointed out that the role of state in India has changed substantially during the last five decades in perceiving poverty .The results show positive success during seventies till mid eighties and stagnation thereafter. The paper incorporates discussion on the differential policy impact in a federal context, on different provinces of the Indian federation and the differential changes in poverty across groups, specifically the rural and urban population and the weaker sections of the society. The paper highlights the experiences of the bypassed regions and groups and attempts to get to the reasons of the policy failures.

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2001

Journal Article

R. S. Desbpande, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, and Narayanamoortby, A., “Indebtedness among agricultural labourers from deprived castes: Towards an explanation”, Artha Vijnana, vol. 43, no. 1-2 , pp. 159-172, 2001.[Abstract]


India's largest share of poor is located among agricultural labourers belonging to Scheduled Castes. The poverty in this group persists and gets perpetuated due to continued discrimination in the employment opportunities and wage market. Owing to the low wages, they are perpetually under debt burden. This issue becomes sharp due to interlocking of labour and credit market. The insignificant participation of this group in the formal credit market makes the situation worse. In this paper, an attempt is made to analyse the indebtedness and market participation of the deprived castes especially on the background of one of the most radical institutional changes, i.e., land reforms. We have used secondary level information available from different sources in order to analyse the issue. The study concludes that due to marginalisation in land market as well as extremely weak bargaining position in the labour market, the indebtedness of this group has been increasing. This situation is aggravated by the relative neglect of this group by formal credit agencies.

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2000

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Narayanamoorthy, A., and Deshpande, R. S. ., “Land market in less developed economies: A study in southern Orissa”, Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, 2000.[Abstract]


The structure and operation of land market in a less developed economy are complex and defy the general expectations about the behaviour of market. Our shady on land market is an attempt towards examining various issues related to the functioning of land market m a theoretical perspective and empirically identifying it based on a village study in southern Onssa. To look into this issue we briefly reviewed the literature on the functionmg of land market and thoroughly examined the interim land transaction model of Basu and the ownership uncertainty model of Feder and Feeny. Basu's model raises a puzzle for the specification of supply and demand functions of land market. One interestig observation emerging out of this is that, essentially, interim transaction of land takes place more often on an ad hoc basis and only the aggregate amount features in the transaction. Such aggregate amount is determined by the quantum and quality of land rather than the quantum of land being decided by price. The conclusion arrived in ownership uncertainty model is that high uncertainty in ownership increases amount of consumption at the expense of demand both for land and capital goods. But the proposition is argued not to be valid because in many parts of the less developed economies, agriculture is labour intensive.

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2000

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Swidden Cultivation: A Review of Concepts and Issues”, 2000.[Abstract]


Encroachment of forest lands for cultivation occupies a central position in the debate on tropical deforestation. The paper attempts to analyse various concepts and issues involved in swidden. These include various ecological, economic and institutional aspects. In ecological issues, we have attempted to see the deforestation, biodiversity and soil erosion problems. Economic issues primarily deal with factor use, production and output and energy efficiency related to swidden vis-à-vis other forms of land use. The institutional aspects see the property right structure and social norms that guide the swiddening society and the state policy that has affected the life style of these people. One of the important issues the paper poses that, the consequences of failure to anticipate the ecological and social facets of land use changes, may lead to short-term economic gains, but sustainability of such changes in the long-run is questionable.

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1999

Journal Article

A. Narayanamoorthy, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, and Deshpande, R. S., “Agricultural growth and migration: search for new evidence”, Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, vol. 54, 3 vol., p. 402, 1999.[Abstract]


The development of theoretical framework in connection with the explanation of migration has always been lopsided mostly confining to a view that migration takes place only from an unorganised sector to the urban organised sector. In view of the recent increase of rural to rural migration it has become necessary to locate new theoretical and empirical evidence in this direction. We tried to put forth three hypotheses. Firstly, there is an explanation of the rural to rural migration in terms of minimum statutory wages and growth rates of agricultural sector. Secondly, technological development of agricultural sector also causes a withdrawal of family labour and increase in the hired labour input. This further results into in-migration from the neighbouring as well as distant regions. This hypothesis needs to be tested further. Lastly, wage differentials and the work participation rates do not play significant roles in explaining migration from rural to rural areas. What we could, however, gather out of the exercise is that despite the absence of wage differentials, growth differentials and even the 'push effect' (due to saturation of labour market), it is difficult to explain distant rural-rural migration. The empirical evidence presented here is, however, not sufficient in support of the theoretical scaffolding. It needs to be attempted at a further disaggregated level.

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1999

Journal Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Agricultural growth and migration: In search of a new evidence”, Gokhale Institute of Poliiics and Economics, 1999.[Abstract]


While concluding his landmark work on why poor people stay poor and putting forth the hypothesis of urban bias. Michael Lipton wrote that".... the rural sector has not obtained (owing to its own weakness and the strength of others) sufficient shares of resources to meet the generally accepted criteria of efficiency and equity. However, the rich and powerful benefit from the resuh of urban bias"(Lipton, 1977, p. 328). Upton's hypothesis of urban bias during the mid-seventies later formed a strong explanatory ground towards explanation More »»

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Conference Paper

A. Nair, Dr. Deepa Gupta, Sangita Khare, Gopalkrishna, D. Manippady, and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Characteristics and causes of malnutrition across Indian states: A cluster analysis based on Indian demographic and health survey data”, in International Conference on Advances in Computing, Communications & Informatics (ICACCI’17), Manipal University, Karnataka , 2017.

2017

Conference Paper

Sangita Khare, Dr. Deepa Gupta, K, P., Dr. Deepika M. G., and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Health and Nutritional Status of Children: Survey, Challenges and Directions”, in 3rd International Conference on Cognitive Computing and information Processing (CCIP 17), JSSATE-B Campus, Bengaluru , 2017.

2014

Conference Paper

K. G. Sa Kumar and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Differences in approach to and output of innovation: Study of "established" and "new entrant" small software businesses in India”, in SIGMIS-CPR 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Computers and People Research, Singapore, 2014, pp. 59-68.[Abstract]


This paper examines whether and how established or incumbent firms and new entrants differ in their approach to innovation and innovation output. Analyzing three streams of theory we argue that established firms base their approach to innovation strategy on their resources, capabilities, technologies, and existing markets, while new entrants approach innovation from emerging customer needs and new markets. We also view that established companies are more likely to produce innovation related to new technology, products, and processes, while new entrants are more likely to perform marketing or business model innovations. In-depth qualitative interviews with CEOs and CEO- level officials in a sample of small software businesses in India produce results that support the conclusions from theory. These results have implications for industry and policy makers and open up avenues for further research. © 2014 ACM.

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2014

Conference Paper

Ua Mishra, Sivramkrishna, Sb, Karthik, Ra, and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Impacts of globalization on Indian industry: Case of financialization in IT and non IT sectors”, in SIGMIS-CPR 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Computers and People Research, Singapore, 2014, pp. 69-75.[Abstract]


This paper endeavors to understand the aspect of financialization that exists in companies, and study the possibility of an increase in an organization's profitability due to accessibility of financial instruments and other investment decisions that can sustain the net margins to meet market expectations and falling operational revenues by the real sector. Our objective is to observe the financial and investment activities of different real sector companies and relate the impact of their existence over the organization's net profits. The study also attempts to seek a further understanding upon the question of its exposure towards IT Service Organizations. With Information Technology reigning as a paramount factor in the Indian Economic context, the question of how financialization applies to the comparison of IT sector vis-à-vis other sectors is the highlight of this paper. This study after an extensive review of literature considers the reported items of the financial statements of 56 companies and analyze the various Non-Operational Items as independent variables that impact the Profit after Tax component of the Income Statement. These variables include income from financial services, other income, interest income, R&D expenditure and workforce and IT service as a dummy variable. The analysis was performed using multiple regression technique. The study overwhelmingly supports significant impact of non-operating income on profit of the organization though there is no statistical difference across IT and non-IT sectors. However, one has to bear in mind the limitation and cross-sectional nature of data before generalizing these results. © 2014 ACM. More »»

2014

Conference Paper

P. Sharma, Nair, V., and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Patterns of online grocery shopping in India: An empirical study”, in ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2014.[Abstract]


India has a large and growing population using internet services for various needs. In the early stage of development IRCTC has created a huge mass of Indian population dependent on internet for online booking of railway ticket. In recent times, there has been manifold increase in exposure and usage of internet to connect Customers to online buying portal for buying various other things. Although the online market in India is at early stage it is expected to grow fast. Due to technology advancement, access to internet, increase in exposure and income, shopping via internet has been showing signs of growth. These technological advancement lead to better lives and have provided a platform to shop grocery items online. Looking at this niche segment and potential of upcoming vibrant market, it would be interesting to understand Customer perception on such services. This trend requires different insight to understand and analyze how online shopping is considerably different from store-based shopping. Marketers have huge opportunity to explore this field as Customers are buying & spending more time online as compare to old times. Today, online shoppers have high expectation as they have from any other store - based retailers. To grab this opportunity retailers are using various strategies to attract Customers to shop online. This paper seeks to understand the patterns of online grocery shopping in India; and explores the factors & trends influencing the online grocery shopping. Our research study focuses to identify various patterns of buying grocery online and factors affecting the process of buying. Worldwide there are studies conducted on online grocery shopping, however we found that very limited studies are highlighting on Indian online grocery market. Therefore our study would help exploring this new dimension of online grocery shopping. Copyright 2014 ACM.

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2006

Conference Paper

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Ecological and Institutional Analysis of Inland Fisheries Resource Management: Productivity in the Case of Tawa Reservoir, India”, in Survival of the Commons: Mounting Challenges and New Realities, the Eleventh Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Bali, Indonesia, 2006.[Abstract]


Fishing in inland water bodies such as flood plain lakes, river, estuaries and reservoirs, has an important role for rural people. Fish is an important source of protein diet of many households and generate significant income as well as provide employment opportunities. 70 percent of the 0.71 million active fisher folks in India are employed in the inland fisheries and India has a total of 19,370 reservoir units covering an area of 31, 53,366 hectares, hence creates a lot of opportunities for economic development of the rural people. Reservoir fisheries are classic case of Common Pool Resources (CPRS) and hence require comprehensive institutional arrangement that can ensure productivity of the fish resources without compromising with the ecological needs. Therefore, through the case of Tawa reservoir, we are trying to understand the fisheries resource and the production scenario. Tawa reservoir has undergone operation through different management regime, and hence, provides an opportunity to comprehend the performance of these regimes and their implications on fisheries resources. In this paper, our attempt is therefore, to understand the dynamics of the fisheries resource of Tawa reservoir. With the limited available data, we analyse the catch and stocking relationship, predator- prey relationship and also to identify the determinants that influence the productivity of the Tawa reservoir. Based on the time-series data available a model was developed to determine the production possibility of the fish resource in Tawa. Our finding suggests that among different regimes existed in Tawa fisheries management, the cooperative form under Tawa Matsya Sangha (TMS)'s performance is better. Ecological and Institutional Analysis of Inland Fisheries Resource Management: Productivity in the Case of Tawa Reservoir, India (PDF Download Available).

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Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2014

Conference Proceedings

G. Sridev, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Bedamatta, S., G, J., and Dr. Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra, “Climate Change Vulnerability and Agrarian Communities: Insights from the Composite Vulnerability Index of Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka”, A.P. Pradeepkumar, F.­J. Behr, F.T. Illiyas and E. Shaji (Eds) Proceedings of the 2nd Disaster, Risk and Vulnerability Conference 2014 (DRVC2014), pp. 112-120, 24-26 April . Dept of Geology, Kerala University, Trivandrum, India, 2014.

Publication Type: Book

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2014

Book

Ma Bavinck and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Introduction: The legal pluralism perspective. Taylor and Francis Inc., 2014, pp. 1-12.

2014

Book

Ma Bavinck and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Conflict, negotiations and natural resource management: A legal pluralism perspective from India. Taylor and Francis Inc., 2014, pp. 1-200.[Abstract]


Governance and management are complicated by the competing claims of parallel legal systems, including state, customary, religious, project and local laws. Whereas much has been written about property rights, this unique collection takes a legal anthropological perspective to explore how the coexistence and interaction between multiple legal orders provide bases for claiming property rights. It examines how hybrid legal institutions have developed over time in India and how these impact on justice in the governance and distribution of natural resources. The book brings together original case studies that offer fresh perspectives on the governance of forests, water, fisheries and agricultural land in a diverse range of social and spatial contexts. This brand new research provides a timely and persuasive overview of the fundamental role of parallel legal systems in shaping how people manage natural resources. It will be of interest to scholars and practitioners of environmental law, property law, environmental politics, anthropology, sociology and geography. More »»

2005

Book

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Transcending sustainability beyond CBA: conceptual insights from empirical study on shifting cultivation in Orissa, vol. 163. Ahmedabad: Gujarat Institute of Development Research, 2005, p. 22.[Abstract]


Conventionally, shifting cultivation (also known as Swidden) has been interpreted as inefficient (economically), destructive (ecologically) and an inflexible static form (institutionally) of agriculture. It is essential not only that the system of production is non-destructive, efficient and adaptive to better changes but also is sustainable. The incidental point emerges out is that whether shifting cultivation is sustainable or not. Therefore, the present paper attempts to verify the criteria of measurement of sustainability in a relatively primitive form of agricultural system and develops some alternative/complimentary ways to look into the factors related to sustainability. Often sustainability of a project or production system is verified through usual cost benefit analysis (CBA). In our study we feel that the essence of understanding the sustainability of shifting cultivation system requires the understanding of factors, which are local in nature that are severely limited by usual CBA. Therefore, we have developed a critique of CBA and alternatively evolved with the land, employment and consumption based analyses in order to evaluate the sustainability of this form of agriculture in the context of Orissa based on primary study. More »»

2005

Book

S. Sivramkrishna and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Monopsonistic exploitation in contract farming: articulating a strategy for grower cooperation, vol. 20, no. 3. Gujarat Institute of Development Research, 2005.[Abstract]


Contract farming has been considered a new hope to instil dynamism in third world agriculture. However, there remains serious concern whether small peasants will be able to benefit from this system since buyers may often be a single large or at most, few large corporations, a typical case of monopsony. In this paper we question the basis of the fears that are often raised in the literature. A clear analytical approach to understanding the (economic) meaning of monopsony helps us articulate a strategy for grower cooperation that could effectively deal with monopsony power in contract farming systems. More »»

Publication Type: Newspaper Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2011

Newspaper Article

Dr. Deepika M. G. and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Choosing the best b-school among equals”, Deccan Herald, 2011.

Publication Type: Magazine Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2010

Magazine Article

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Global Food Inflation and Food Security Issues”, The Analyst, 2010.

Publication Type: Thesis

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2004

Thesis

Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “Ecological, economic and institutional aspects of shifting agriculture: A study in Orissa”, INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGE, BANGALORE UNIVERSITY , BANGALORE, 2004.

Year of Publication Title
2011

Paper titled The Role of Microfinance in Poverty Alleviation and Women Empowerment: The Case of Kudumbashree in Kerala published in Daniel Lazar. Edited Embodiment of Empowerment: Self Help Group published by Vijay Nicole Imprints Pvt. Ltd.

2010

Published a paper titled Growth Prospects in Automation Industry in India: Promises and Prospects in Marketing Mastermind, No.11.

RECENT SEMINARS/PROJECTS/CONFERENCES

  • Paper titled "The Forest and the Trees: Delineating the Protected Area Debate in India" and Chaired the session on CULTURE AND GOVERNANCE in the Jubilee Congress of the Commission on Legal Pluralism held at University of Cape Town, South Africa during 8th and 10th of September 2011
  • Consulted International Water Management Institute (IWMI) on a project titled Urban Agriculture: A Sustainable Solution to Alleviating Urban Poverty, Addressing the Food Crisis and Adapting to Climate Change for their pilot study in Bangalore. This project was funded by World Bank through Resource Center on Urban Agriculture & Food Security (RUAF) Foundation.
  • Paper titled Livelihood Issues in Arid Ecosystem: A study on Kachchh(Co-authored with S. Usha Nandhini and Deepika. M. G)was presented in the SKILLS2010, International Working Conference for the Track: Life and Livelihood skills and Employment in Hyderabad on 17th of December 2010
  • Participated in the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Commons held at Hyderabad India in January 10-14, 2011 and presented the paper titled Institutionalizing Common Pool Resources: Insights from Tawa Fisheries Cooperative
  • Participated in the 4th International Conference on Micro Financeheld during 27th-29th January 2011 and presented a paper titled The Role of Micro finance in Poverty Alleviation and Women Empowerment: The Case of Kudumbashree in Kerala (With Sigi. M. D and Deepika. M. G) Organized by School of Management, Pondicherry University.

AWARDS/RECOGNITIONS

  • Received Sir Ratan Tata Trust Small Grant from Institute for Social and Economic Change to conduct a research study on Sustainability of Cooperative Models: A Study of CAMPCO
  • Received VKRV Rao Memorial Award for best PhD Thesis from Institute for Social and Economic Change
207
PROGRAMS
OFFERED
5
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
CONSTITUENT
SCHOOLS
A
GRADE BY
NAAC, MHRD
8th
RANK(INDIA):
NIRF 2018
150+
INTERNATIONAL
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