Qualification: 
MDS
Email: 
joejoseph@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. Joe Joseph joined the Department of Public Health Dentistry at Amrita in 2011.

He graduated from Manipal college of Dental Sciences and completed postgradaution from S. D. M. dental college, Dharwad. He has been trained in research methodology from Indian Institute of Public Health, Gandhinagar. Before joining Amrita, he worked as Assistant professor at Sirte Dental School, Libya.

Dr. Joe's areas of interest include Qualitative Research, School Oral Health Programme, Preventive Dentistry, Environment and Health and Spirituality. He has presented papers in national and international conferences and has publications in national journals.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

Dr. Chandrashekar Janakiram, Joseph, J., and Antony, B., “Career satisfaction among dental public health specialists in India – A cross-sectional survey”, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, vol. 11, pp. ZC97-ZC101, 2017.[Abstract]


Introduction: The satisfaction in career is an important indicator for the growth of the discipline and the profession. An empirical investigation of satisfaction in career and amendments needed in course and profession may help in growth of discipline. Aim: To assess career satisfaction among Dental Public Health (DPH) specialists working in India and analyze their perspective on changes required in the profession. Materials and Methods: Questionnaire for this cross-sectional survey was adapted from Minnesota Job Satisfaction Survey which included 40 enquiries to understand the reasons for choosing public health dentistry as career, competencies of public health dentists, satisfaction as a public health dentist and changes required in the profession. The questions were both open and closed end type. Updated electronic mail details of all registered public health dentists were collected from the head office of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry. Each participant was contacted by electronic mail and consent to participate were sought. Reminders were e-mailed thrice during three months. A total of 580 participants were contacted. A total of 183 responses were received, among which 179 consented. Results: Nearly half of the respondents felt they are yet to achieve the accomplishment from the present career as public health dentist. Only 46.9% felt that there is advancement in the profession as career. Nearly three-fourth of respondents could not attain recognition as a public health dentist. A 45.8% of respondents were of the opinion that career in public health dentistry would provide them a steady employment and 53.1% of public health dentists would envision as satisfied in their career in next 10 years. Nearly 85% felt public health dentistry training needs a major course correction. Conclusion: There has been some reservation or skepticism about the future of the specialty as the jobs are in declining stage. This information provides insight about success and failures of public health dentistry as profession which would be needed for planning the dental manpower. © 2017, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.

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2017

Journal Article

Dr. Chandrashekar Janakiram, Kumar, C. V. Deepan, and Joseph, J., “Xylitol in preventing dental caries: A systematic review and meta-analyses”, Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine, vol. 8, pp. 16-21, 2017.[Abstract]


Xylitol is a sugar alcohol having the properties that reduce levels of mutans streptococci (MS) in the plaque and saliva. To assess the role of xylitol in preventing dental caries. Systematic review and meta-analysis developed by Cochrane cooperation were adapted. Electronic search was carried out in PubMed through the period up to 2014. Included clinical studies were done on (1) humans (2) participants include both individuals and as pairs (mother-child) (3) participants using orthodontic appliances (4) xylitol dispensed in any form (5) compare the effect of xylitol on dental caries and on other phenotype that determines the preventive effect on dental caries, such as decayed, missing, and filled (DMF/dmf) and salivary or plaque MS level. Twenty articles of the 477 articles initially identified. Among 20 studies indexed, 16 articles were accessed, systematically reviewed, and the meta-analysis was carried out. The evaluation of quality of the studies was done using risk of bias assessment tool. The quality of the studies was high risk and unclear risk for six and five trials. The meta-analysis shows a reduction in DMF/dmf with the standard mean (SM) of -1.09 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], -1.34, -0.83) comparing xylitol to all controls. The effect of DMF/dmf reduction by xylitol to fluoride varnish was with the SM of -1.87 (95% CI, -2.89, -0.84). The subgroup analysis, there was a reduction in MS count with SM of 0.30 (95% CI, 0.05, 0.56) when compared with all other caries preventive strategies; however, it was insignificant. Xylitol was found to be an effective strategy as self-applied caries preventive agent. © 2017 Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine.

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2017

Journal Article

V. Sanjeevan, Dr. Chandrashekar Janakiram, Joseph, J., Yeturu, S. K., and Ramanarayanan, V., “Letter to the editor: ‘Long-term effectiveness of school-based children oral hygiene program on oral health after 10-year follow-up’ by Lai et al. (2016)”, Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, vol. 45, pp. 189-190, 2017.[Abstract]


‘Long-term effectiveness of school-based children oral hygiene program on oral health after 10-year follow-up

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2016

Journal Article

S. K. Yeturu, Annapurani, R., Dr. Chandrashekar Janakiram, Joseph, J., and Pentapati, K. C., “Assessment of knowledge and attitudes of fire safety – An institution based study”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, vol. 8, pp. 1281-1284, 2016.[Abstract]


Introduction: Fire safety is essential component and requirement in building infrastructure plans and provision of fire safety systems is mandatory even in dental care settings. Knowledge regarding the use of these systems in various instances is essential to all health care workers including dentists, dental students and auxiliaries. Aim: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of fire safety among undergraduate, postgraduate dental students and staff in Amrita School of Dentistry and to find any association between education level and knowledge regarding fire safety. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted by distributing a 20 itemed self-administered questionnaire which consisted of 4 dichotomous responses, 6 rating scale responses, 3 multiple responses and 7 open ended questions. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: A total of 270 participated in the study. Nearly half of the participants have a positive attitude towards fire safety and very few participants knew the way to use fire control measures in case of fire accident. Conclusion: There was an appreciably good knowledge about fire safety among dentists and dental students with a positive attitude towards safe practice.

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2015

Journal Article

C. V. Deepan Kumar, Mohamed, S., Dr. Chandrashekar Janakiram, and Joseph, J., “Validation of dental impact on daily living questionnaire among tribal population of India”, Contemporary Clinical Dentistry, vol. 6, pp. S235-S241, 2015.[Abstract]


Background: Oral conditions are known to affect various aspects of quality of life. Similarly, the social consequence of the quality of life in the day to day living is also equally important. Several studies have quantified the social consequences of diseases through activity limitations in people's daily living. The instruments which cover a broad spectrum of life are proposed to be compared with the clinical oral hygiene status of people from different social classes. Aim: To assess the validity of dental impact on daily living (DIDL) questionnaire measuring subjective dental problems and their impact in the day to day life among tribes of Wayanad. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Materials and Methods: DIDL questionnaire developed by Leao and Sheiham was used. We recorded the clinical oral health status using decayed, missing, filled, simplified oral hygiene index, and community periodontal index indices, to correlate the subjective findings of dental impact tribe to obtain construct validity of the questionnaire. Analysis: Descriptive statistics and Spearman's correlation using IBM SPSS software version 20. Results: In the study population of 250 participants, the majority of the participants were from the age group between 36 and 50 years (40%) and females were in the majority (64%). The clinical status of the participants was poor in the majority while their perceived impact in their day to day living was found to be relatively satisfied. The study results show the DIDL tool had weak validity in relation to the clinical status with relevance to the social status of Indian tribal population. Conclusion: The study result shows that there was insignificant and weak validity between the DIDL tool and the oral health status among these tribes who were from a low social class. This might be because their priority in life which is different from what a person from high social class. So the dental problem is ignored at the level of individual depending on his/her priority and at the community level by the policy makers.

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2014

Journal Article

S. Mohamed and Joseph, J., “Public health dentistry education program in India.”, Indian journal of public health, vol. 58, p. 206, 2014.[Abstract]


Public Health Dentistry is a specialty post graduate program in field of dentistry. Although it is in a nascent stage in India the specialty is very much advanced in most of the developed countries and has led to betterment of population in relation to oral health. Water fluoridation, school based preventive programmers, use of fluoridated toothpaste are some of the major reasons for the decline of dental caries in the developed world.

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