Qualification: 
Ph.D, M.Tech, B-Tech
k_sreevalsa@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathyar currently serves as Assistant Professor (SG) at the department of Civil Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, Coimbatore Campus. He pursued his M.Tech. from, IIT Kanpur and Ph.D from IISc Bangalore.

Publications

Publication Type: Book

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2019

Book

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, TG, S., and A, H., Handbook on Geocell Technology, Springer Transactions in Civil and Environmental Engineering (Upcoming). 2019.

2018

Book

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and TG, S., Earthquake Hazard and Risk Assessment in India and Adjacent Regions. CRC Press / Balkema, Taylor & Francis Group, 2018.[Abstract]


This book represents a significant contribution to the area of earthquake data processing and to the development of region-specific magnitude correlations to create an up-to-date homogeneous earthquake catalogue that is uniform in magnitude scale. The book discusses seismicity analysis and estimation of seismicity parameters of a region at both finer and broader levels using different methodologies. The delineation and characterization of regional seismic source zones which requires reasonable observation and engineering judgement is another subject covered. Considering the complex seismotectonic composition of a region, use of numerous methodologies (DSHA and PSHA) in analyzing the seismic hazard using appropriate instruments such as the logic tree will be elaborated to explicitly account for epistemic uncertainties considering alternative models (for Source model, Mmax estimation and Ground motion prediction equations) to estimate the PGA value at bedrock level. Further, VS30 characterization based on the topographic gradient, to facilitate the development of surface level PGA maps using appropriate amplification factors, is discussed. Evaluation of probabilistic liquefaction potential is also explained in the book. Necessary backgrounds and contexts of the aforementioned topics are elaborated through a case study specific to India which features spatiotemporally varied and complex tectonics. The methodology and outcomes presented in this book will be beneficial to practising engineers and researchers working in the fields of seismology and geotechnical engineering in particular and to society in general.

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2018

Book

N. James, Sitharam, T. G., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Comprehensive Seismic Zonation Schemes for Regions at Different Scales. Springer, Cham, 2018.[Abstract]


This book reviews and assesses the various methodologies for site characterization and site effect estimation to carry out seismic zonation at micro and macro levels. Readers will learn about the suitability of these methodologies for each level of zoning that needs to be assessed in order to optimize the resources for carrying out seismic zonation. The Indian sub-continent is highly vulnerable to earthquake hazards, and past studies have focused primarily on the Himalayan region (inter-plate zone) and the northeast region (subduction zone). The book improves understanding of the Peninsular India that also has significantly high seismicity and is prone to earthquakes of sizeable magnitude. Particular attention is given to the various methodologies for assessing seismic hazards, the scales at which site characterizations are carried out, and optimal methods for zonation practices using site data and hazard indexes. Aimed at students, this book will be of use to post-graduates and doctoral students researching seismic zonation, hazard assessment and mitigation, and spatial data in earth sciences.

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2017

Book

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and Kolathayar, S., Preparing for Earthquakes: Lessons for India. Springer, Cham, 2017.[Abstract]


Introduction
The primary goals of this brief are to invoke alertness and solidarity among the public in earthquake prone areas of India, and to empower the community to prepare themselves to face and manage the aftermath of an earthquake. The work presented here sheds new light on the action plans to be taken by the common public and public agencies, before, during and after earthquakes to safeguard lives of people and minimize loss of assets.
This carefully presented book articulates various factors related to earthquake preparedness, and develops guidelines and useful tips for communicating them to relevant stakeholders. The book has been divided into three parts: (i) the first providing background which explains earthquakes in general and seismicity of India (ii) the second explores earthquake preparedness intended for individuals, families and various stakeholders, and (iii) the final section which describes various strategies for communities to prepare themselves for a future earthquake.

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Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Journal Article

S. S. Kurup and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Seismic Bearing Capacity Factor Considering Composite Failure Mechanism: Pseudo-Dynamic Approach”, International Journal of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 65-77, 2018.[Abstract]


This article describes how the design of shallow foundation needs complete knowledge about bearing capacity. During earthquakes additional lateral force acts at the foundation bed which reduces the bearing capacity. Most of the literature present either the pseudo static analysis or assume a planar failure surface to estimate seismic bearing capacity factors. Here, a pseudo dynamic approach that considers the time dependent effect of earthquake loading is employed. A composite failure surface has been considered for a more realistic estimation of seismic bearing capacity. New expressions were formulated to arrive at the seismic bearing capacity factor, considering the forces acting on the failure wedge based on the limit equilibrium approach. The effect of soil friction angles and the seismic peak of horizontal ground accelerations on the seismic bearing capacity were studied using the proposed method. It was observed that present pseudo-dynamic analysis with a composite failure mechanism gives lower values of seismic bearing capacity factors when compared to pseudstatic analysis.

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, S, R., and AK, S., “Studies on Strength Behavior of Subgrade Soil mixed with Sand Manufacturing Dust and Fiber”, Journal of GeoEngineering, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 79-84, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper introduces the potential of sand manufacturing dust (SMD), generated during the production of manufactured sand, in pavement applications. An attempt has been done to improve the subgrade properties of weak soil, with the addition of SMD and along with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers. The introduction of new materials, the design of experiments, further analysis and interpretation from the research content of this manuscript. The optimum percentage of SMD and the PVA fiber to be added to the soil for better performance of subgrade is estimated and their suitability for use in pavement construction has been demonstrated. It was observed that addition of 10% of SMD to the soil performed better in terms of California bearing ratio (CBR). A series of tests were conducted with 10% SMD, 3% cement and varying percentages of fiber (0, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%). The performance has been evaluated in terms of CBR, unconfined compression strength (UCS) tests, split tensile tests and cyclic triaxial test. The test results indicated that the soil stabilized with SMD and PVA fibers performs better under both static and dynamic loadings. The improvement in strength with suggested modifications was found to be very significant (up to 50-fold increase).

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Sudhakaran, S. P., and Sharma, A. K., “Soil Stabilization Using Bottom Ash and Areca Fiber: Experimental Investigations and Reliability Analysis”, Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering (ASCE) , vol. 30, no. 8, 2018.[Abstract]


The rapid development of urban areas and the increase in construction activities have resulted in a scarcity of land with favorable soil conditions, necessitating the use of locally available weak soils for construction activities through stabilization techniques. This study introduces a new material, areca fiber, and its suitability as soil reinforcement. Although areca is available abundantly in many parts of the world, its application in geotechnical engineering has not been explored. In the present study, bottom ash (BA) is used as a stabilizing agent, and the suitability of natural areca fiber as reinforcement is demonstrated through detailed experimental investigations and reliability analysis. The test method includes compaction tests, unconfined compression strength (UCS) tests, California bearing ratio (CBR) tests, and split tensile strength tests. The BA content was varied from 0 to 40%, the fiber content was varied from 0 to 1.5%, and the corresponding performance assessment was done. A small amount of cement (3%) was also added to improve the pozzolanic reaction. The UCS and split tensile strength tests were conducted on samples at different curing periods with a maximum curing for 90 days, whereas CBR tests were conducted after 7 days of curing for both soaked and unsoaked conditions. There was considerable increase in UCS, CBR, and split tensile strength of the soil with addition of BA, and the strength values increased tremendously in the presence of areca fiber. Mineralogical and microstructural studies were conducted on the stabilized soil sample using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. These results confirmed the formation of cementitious compounds in the XRD patterns and showed development of dense matrix in the SEM images. The performance of the modified subgrade soil was validated using a reliability approach, which found that the soil subgrade with BA and areca fiber can certainly be used as pavement material for low-volume applications.

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, R, P. C., and G., S. T., “Geotechnical Considerations for the Concept of Coastal Reservoir at Mangaluru to Impound the Flood Waters of Netravati River”, Marine Georesources & Geotechnology, pp. 1-9, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper explores the geotechnical feasibility for constructing coastal reservoir in Arabian Sea off Mangaluru coast. This envisages storing fresh water in a reservoir along the coast by building a sea dike to impound the flood waters of Netravati River. On one side, the dike will ensure the required quantity of freshwater flow from Netravati River to the reservoir without being drained to the sea. On the other side, the sea dike will prevent seawater from entering the reservoir, avoiding the salt contamination of the freshwater supply. Present study presents detailed investigation of the soil profiles of surrounding region of Mangaluru to explore the site condition at off Ullal beach. Lithological data on the Netravati estuary were also presented with key observation on the soil profiles in the area proposed for location of coastal reservoirs. The key finding of the study is that the region offshore of Ullal is devoid of sand and is comprised mainly of soft Silty clays. Lithological data of nine foundations at Netravati Bridge near Ullal are also presented in this paper. Based on the findings of geotechnical investigations, the paper concludes that construction of sea dike in Arabian Sea off Mangaluru coast is feasible

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2017

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, G, S. T., and R, R., “Feasibility of Creating a Fresh Water Reservoir in the Arabian Sea Impounding the Flood Waters of Netravathi River”, Journal of Sustainable Urbanization, Planning and Progress, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 38-42, 2017.[Abstract]


This paper addresses the feasibility of creating a fresh water reservoir in the Arabian sea impounding the flood waters from Netravathi river. The project schemes comprises mainly two steps first the construction of the dyke in the Arabian Sea, and second the process of natural replacement of salty water by rainwater and surface runoff to the reservoir. The study presents the detailed hydrological analysis of Netravati and Gurupura rivers including estimation of runoff into the sea.The study estimates the surface runoff at inlet and outlets of Netravati basin along the costal lines of Arabian Sea. The existing Land use along the costal lines of Netravati basin is assessed. The dyke must be designed to separate fresh water from the salty waters of the Arabian Sea considering the tidal variations and wave heights. The bathymetric profiles of the sea bed has been created and presented in the paper. The annual runoff at the mouth of Netravati River was estimated as 388 TMC and just 2.5% of this would be sufficient to meet the present water shortfall of Bengaluru and Mangaluru. The annual sediment load was found to be negligible. The water quality parameters are well within permissible limits ensuring quality water from Netravathi to the proposed coastal reservoir.

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2017

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, G, S. T., and P, S. M., “Feasibility Study on Formation of Fresh Water Reservoir and Impounding the Surface Runoff for Urban Water Survival in a Coastal Brackish Water Region of Kollam”, Journal of Sustainable Urbanization, Planning and Progress, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 34-37, 2017.[Abstract]


The paper presents the feasibility study on the formation of fresh water reservoir and impounding the surface runoff in a typical brackish water lake of southern India, Ashtamudi Lake for urban water survival of Coastal town, Kollam, India. The concept envisages of building a barrage at the outlet of Ashtamudi Lake at the mouth of the Arabian Sea to serve the purpose of preventing seawater intrusion into the lake, avoiding the contamination of the freshwater supply from sea water. To validate the concept, it is proposed to conduct a feasibility study which addresses the concerns about the availability of runoff from Kallada River. The paper also presents possible schemes for storing fresh water within Ashtamudi Lake by constructing dikes at appropriate locations. The length of dike and the volume of water that can be stored with proposed schemes are outlined in the paper.

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2016

Journal Article

N. M, TG, S., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “A Revisit to Seismic Hazard at Uttarakhand”, International Journal of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, vol. 6, no. 2, 2016.[Abstract]


This paper presents the seismic hazard of the state of Uttarakhand in India, located at the foothills of the seismically active Himalayan mountain ranges. In the present study, an updated catalog of earthquakes has been prepared for Uttarakhand which was homogenized into a unified moment magnitude scale after declustering of the catalog to remove aftershocks and foreshocks. Various source zones were identified in the study area to account for local variability in seismicity characteristics. The seismicity parameters were estimated for each of these source zones, which are necessary inputs into seismic hazard estimation of a region. The seismic hazard evaluation of the region based on a state-of-the art PSHA study was performed using the classical Cornell–McGuire approach with different source models and attenuation relations. The most recent knowledge of seismic activity in the region was used to evaluate the hazard, incorporating uncertainty associated with different modeling parameters as well as spatial and temporal uncertainties. The PSHA was performed with currently available data and their best possible scientific interpretation using an appropriate instrument such as the logic tree to explicitly account for epistemic uncertainty by considering alternative models. The hazard maps were produced for horizontal ground motion at the bedrock level and an attempt was done to bring the hazard at surface level using appropriate amplification factors. The maximum PHA value at bedrock level for 10% Probability of exceedance (PE) in 50 years is 0.34g and same for 2% PE in 50 years is 0.54g.

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2015

Journal Article

T. G. Sitharam, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and James, N., “Probabilistic assessment of surface level seismic hazard in India using topographic gradient as a proxy for site condition”, Geoscience Frontiers, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 847 - 859, 2015.[Abstract]


This paper presents spatial variation of seismic hazard at the surface level for India, covering 6–38° N and 68–98° E. The most recent knowledge on seismic activity in the region has been used to evaluate the hazard incorporating uncertainties associated with the seismicity parameters using different modeling methodologies. Three types of seismic source models, viz. linear sources, gridded seismicity model and areal sources, were considered to model the seismic sources and different sets of ground motion prediction equations were used for different tectonic provinces to characterize the attenuation properties. The hazard estimation at bedrock level has been carried out using probabilistic approach and the results obtained from various methodologies were combined in a logic tree framework. The seismic site characterization of India was done using topographic slope map derived from Digital Elevation Model data. This paper presents estimation of the hazard at surface level, using appropriate site amplification factors corresponding to various site classes based on \{VS30\} values derived from the topographic gradient. Spatial variation of surface level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) for return periods of 475 years and 2475 years are presented as contour maps. More »»

2014

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Sitharam, T. G., and Vipin, K. S., “Probabilistic Liquefaction Potential Evaluation for India and Adjoining Areas”, Indian Geotechnical Journal, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 269–277, 2014.[Abstract]


Earthquakes are known to have occurred in India from ancient times. More than 50 {%} of the country is vulnerable to earthquakes and it has a coastline of 7,517 km, which implies towards high risk of seismic hazards like liquefaction. Seismic liquefaction is the process by which saturated, unconsolidated soil or sand is converted into a suspension during an earthquake and its effect on structures and buildings can be devastating. In the present study, an attempt has been made to predict the liquefaction susceptibility of India based on corrected SPT values required to prevent the liquefaction for given return periods. The evaluation of liquefaction potential requires the calculation of two parameters, seismic loading and the soil resistance. In order to consider the worst scenario for liquefaction, the water table was assumed at the ground surface. In most of the studies, the seismic loading will be evaluated based on probabilistic methods and the evaluation of soil resistance will be done based on deterministic analysis. In this study an attempt was made to predict the corrected SPT values required to prevent the liquefaction, using probabilistic performance based approach. The contour curves showing the spatial variation of SPT values required to prevent the liquefaction at 3 m depth, for return periods of 475 and 2,500 years are presented in the paper.

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2013

Journal Article

T. G. Sitharam and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Seismic hazard analysis of India using areal sources”, Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, vol. 62, pp. 647 - 653, 2013.[Abstract]


In view of the major advancement made in understanding the seismicity and seismotectonics of the Indian region in recent times, an updated probabilistic seismic hazard map of India covering 6–38°N and 68–98°E is prepared. This paper presents the results of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of India done using regional seismic source zones and four well recognized attenuation relations considering varied tectonic provinces in the region. The study area was divided into small grids of size 0.1° × 0.1°. Peak Horizontal Acceleration (PHA) and spectral accelerations for periods 0.1 s and 1 s have been estimated and contour maps showing the spatial variation of the same are presented in the paper. The present study shows that the seismic hazard is moderate in peninsular shield, but the hazard in most parts of North and Northeast India is high.

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2013

Journal Article

A. Sil, Sitharam, T. G., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of Tripura and Mizoram states”, Natural Hazards, vol. 68, no. 2, pp. 1089–1108, 2013.[Abstract]


A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for the states of Tripura and Mizoram in North East India is presented in this paper to evaluate the ground motion at bedrock level. Analyses were performed considering the available earthquake catalogs collected from different sources since 1731–2010 within a distance of 500 km from the political boundaries of the states. Earthquake data were declustered to remove the foreshocks and aftershocks in time and space window and then statistical analysis was carried out for data completeness. Based on seismicity, tectonic features and fault rupture mechanism, this region was divided into six major seismogenic zones and subsequently seismicity parameters (a and b) were calculated using Gutenberg–Richter (G–R) relationship. Faults data were extracted from SEISAT (Seismotectonic atlas of India, Geological Survey of India, New Delhi, 2000) published by Geological Survey of India and also from satellite images. The study area was divided into small grids of size 0.05° × 0.05° (approximately 5 km × 5 km), and the hazard parameters (rock level peak horizontal acceleration and spectral accelerations) were calculated at the center of each of these grid cells considering all the seismic sources within a radius of 500 km. Probabilistic seismic hazard analyses were carried out for Tripura and Mizoram states using the predictive ground motion equations given by Atkinson and Boore (Bull Seismol Soc Am 93:1703–1729, 2003) and Gupta (Soil Dyn Earthq Eng 30:368–377, 2010) for subduction belt. Attenuation relations were validated with the observed PGA values. Results are presented in the form of hazard curve, peak ground acceleration (PGA) and uniform hazard spectra for Agartala and Aizawl city (respective capital cities of Tripura and Mizoram states). Spatial variation of PGA at bedrock level with 2 and 10 {%} probability of exceedance in 50 years has been presented in the paper.

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2013

Journal Article

K. S. Vipin, Sitharam, T. G., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Assessment of seismic hazard and liquefaction potential of Gujarat based on probabilistic approaches”, Natural Hazards, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 1179–1195, 2013.[Abstract]


Gujarat is one of the fastest-growing states of India with high industrial activities coming up in major cities of the state. It is indispensable to analyse seismic hazard as the region is considered to be most seismically active in stable continental region of India. The Bhuj earthquake of 2001 has caused extensive damage in terms of causality and economic loss. In the present study, the seismic hazard of Gujarat evaluated using a probabilistic approach with the use of logic tree framework that minimizes the uncertainties in hazard assessment. The peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) and spectral acceleration (Sa) values were evaluated for 10 and 2 {%} probability of exceedance in 50 years. Two important geotechnical effects of earthquakes, site amplification and liquefaction, are also evaluated, considering site characterization based on site classes. The liquefaction return period for the entire state of Gujarat is evaluated using a performance-based approach. The maps of PHA and PGA values prepared in this study are very useful for seismic hazard mitigation of the region in future.

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2012

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and Sitharam, T. G., “Comprehensive Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of the Andaman–Nicobar Regions”, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, vol. 102, no. 5, pp. 2063-2076, 2012.[Abstract]


An updated catalog of earthquakes has been prepared for the Andaman–Nicobar and adjoining regions. The catalog was homogenized to a unified magnitude scale, and declustering of the catalog was performed to remove aftershocks and foreshocks. Eleven regional source zones were identified in the study area to account for local variability in seismicity characteristics. The seismicity parameters were estimated for each of these source zones, and the seismic hazard evaluation of the Andaman–Nicobar region has been performed using different source models and attenuation relations. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis has been performed with currently available data and their best possible scientific interpretation using an appropriate instrument such as the logic tree to explicitly account for epistemic uncertainty by considering alternative models (source models, maximum magnitude, and attenuation relationships). The hazard maps for different periods have been produced for horizontal ground motion on the bedrock level. More »»

2012

Journal Article

T. G. Sitharam and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Characterization of Regional Seismic Source Zones in and around India”, Seismological Research Letters (Seismological Society of America) , vol. 83, pp. 77-85, 2012.[Abstract]


Identification and characterization of seismic sources are essential input for seismic hazard analysis. A complete and consistent catalog of earthquakes in a region can offer good data for studying the distribution of earthquakes with respect to space, time, and magnitude. Earthquakes are known to have occurred in the region of the Indian subcontinent from historic times. Most of the activities, including many great earthquakes, have occurred in the northern subcontinent and in the Andaman and Nicobar regions. In the southern peninsula, damaging earthquakes have occurred, but their frequency was less and magnitudes were lower than the plate boundary earthquakes. The tectonic framework of the Indian subcontinent—an area of about 3.2 million square kilometers—is complex and varied spatially. This necessitates identifying different regions of similar seismicity. In this study we attempt to identify and characterize regional seismic source zones based on a homogeneous catalog of earthquakes in and around India from 250 BC until 2010. We identified different regional seismic source zones and created separate catalogs for each respective zone. Most earthquake catalogs do not report earthquake magnitudes consistently over time, which may hinder defining seismicity patterns or assessing seismic hazards. The magnitude scales used for earthquake catalogs in India are not homogeneous. Compiling a complete catalog of earthquakes with uniform magnitudes is essential for defining seismicity patterns and assessing seismic hazards for a region (Chen and Tsai 2008). Hence the original magnitudes of earthquakes have to be converted to a common and reliable magnitude scale using appropriate magnitude correlations. In the raw catalog, many events can be dependent events that occurred in association with a mainshock in a cluster. More »»

2012

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Vipin, K. S., and Sitharam, T. G., “Spatial variation of seismicity parameters across India and adjoining areas”, Natural Hazards (Springer Publications), vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 1365–1379, 2012.[Abstract]


An attempt has been made to quantify the variability in the seismic activity rate across the whole of India and adjoining areas (0–45°N and 60–105°E) using earthquake database compiled from various sources. Both historical and instrumental data were compiled and the complete catalog of Indian earthquakes till 2010 has been prepared. Region-specific earthquake magnitude scaling relations correlating different magnitude scales were achieved to develop a homogenous earthquake catalog for the region in unified moment magnitude scale. The dependent events (75.3{%}) in the raw catalog have been removed and the effect of aftershocks on the variation of b value has been quantified. The study area was divided into 2,025 grid points (1°×1°) and the spatial variation of the seismicity across the region have been analyzed considering all the events within 300 km radius from each grid point. A significant decrease in seismic b value was seen when declustered catalog was used which illustrates that a larger proportion of dependent events in the earthquake catalog are related to lower magnitude events. A list of 203,448 earthquakes (including aftershocks and foreshocks) occurred in the region covering the period from 250 B.C. to 2010 A.D. More »»

2012

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Sitharam, T. G., and Vipin, K. S., “Deterministic seismic hazard macrozonation of India”, Journal of Earth System Science, vol. 121, no. 5, pp. 1351–1364, 2012.[Abstract]


Earthquakes are known to have occurred in Indian subcontinent from ancient times. This paper presents the results of seismic hazard analysis of India (6°–38°N and 68°–98°E) based on the deterministic approach using latest seismicity data (up to 2010). The hazard analysis was done using two different source models (linear sources and point sources) and 12 well recognized attenuation relations considering varied tectonic provinces in the region. The earthquake data obtained from different sources were homogenized and declustered and a total of 27,146 earthquakes of moment magnitude 4 and above were listed in the study area. The sesismotectonic map of the study area was prepared by considering the faults, lineaments and the shear zones which are associated with earthquakes of magnitude 4 and above. A new program was developed in MATLAB for smoothing of the point sources. For assessing the seismic hazard, the study area was divided into small grids of size 0.1° × 0.1° (approximately 10 × 10 km), and the hazard parameters were calculated at the center of each of these grid cells by considering all the seismic sources within a radius of 300 to 400 km. Rock level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) and spectral accelerations for periods 0.1 and 1 s have been calculated for all the grid points with a deterministic approach using a code written in MATLAB. Epistemic uncertainty in hazard definition has been tackled within a logic-tree framework considering two types of sources and three attenuation models for each grid point. The hazard evaluation without logic tree approach also has been done for comparison of the results. The contour maps showing the spatial variation of hazard values are presented in the paper. More »»

2012

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Vipin, K. S., and Sitharam, T. G., “Recent Seismicity in India and Adjoining Regions”, International Journal of Earth Sciences and Engineering, vol. 5, pp. 51–59, 2012.[Abstract]


In the present work, historical and instrumental seismicity data of India and its adjoining areas (within 300km from Indian political boundary) are compiled to form the earthquake catalog for the country covering the period from 1505 to 2009. The initial catalogue consisted of about 139563 earthquake events and after declustering, the total number of events obtained was 61315. Region specific earthquake magnitude scaling relations correlating different magnitude scales were achieved and a homogenous earthquake catalogue in moment magnitude (M W) scale was developed for the region. This paper also presents the results of the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to prepare a digitized seismic source map of India. The latest earthquake data were superimposed on the digitized source map to get a final Seismotectonic map of India. The study area has been divided into 1225 grid points (approximately 110km×110km) and the seismicity analysis has been done to get the spatial variation of seismicity parameters 'a' and 'b' across the country.

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2011

Journal Article

P. Ghosh and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Seismic Passive Earth Pressure Behind Non Vertical Wall with Composite Failure Mechanism: Pseudo-Dynamic Approach”, Geotechnical and Geological Engineering, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 363–373, 2011.[Abstract]


This note shows a study on the seismic passive earth pressure behind a non-vertical cantilever retaining wall using pseudo-dynamic approach. A composite failure surface comprising of an arc of the logarithmic spiral near the wall and a straight line in the planar shear zone near the ground, has been considered behind the retaining wall. The effects of soil friction angle, wall inclination, wall friction angle, amplification of vibration, horizontal and vertical earthquake acceleration on the passive earth pressure have been explored in this study. The results available in the literature for passive pressure, on the basis of pseudo-static analysis are found to predict the passive resistance on the conservative side and the assumption of a planar failure surface is found to overestimate the passive resistance for higher wall friction. An attempt has been made in the present study to overcome both the limitations simultaneously. The present results are compared with the existing values in the literature and found a reasonable match among the values. More »»

2011

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and Ghosh, P., “Seismic Passive Earth Pressure on Walls with Bilinear Backface Using Pseudo-Dynamic Approach”, Geotechnical and Geological Engineering, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 307–317, 2011.[Abstract]


By using pseudo-dynamic approach, a method has been proposed in this paper to compute the seismic passive earth pressure behind a rigid cantilever retaining wall with bilinear backface. The wall has sudden change in inclination along its depth and a planar failure surface has been considered behind the retaining wall. The effects of a wide range of parameters like soil friction angle, wall inclination, wall friction angle, amplification of vibration, variation of shear modulus and horizontal and vertical seismic accelerations on the passive earth pressure have been explored in the present study. For the sake of illustration, the computations have been exclusively carried out for constant wall friction through out the depth. Unlike the Mononobe-Okabe method, which incorporates pseudo-static analysis, the present analysis predicts a nonlinear variation of passive earth pressure along the wall.

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2009

Journal Article

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and Ghosh, P., “Seismic active earth pressure on walls with bilinear backface using pseudo-dynamic approach”, Computers and Geotechnics, vol. 36, no. 7, pp. 1229 - 1236, 2009.[Abstract]


This paper presents a study on the seismic active earth pressure behind a rigid cantilever retaining wall with bilinear backface using pseudo-dynamic approach. The wall has sudden change in inclination along its depth and a planar failure surface has been considered behind the retaining wall. The effects of a wide range of parameters like soil friction angle, wall inclination, wall friction angle, amplification of vibration, variation of shear modulus, and horizontal and vertical seismic accelerations on the active earth pressure have been explored in the present study. Unlike the Mononobe-Okabe method, which incorporates pseudo-static analysis, the present analysis predicts a nonlinear variation of active earth pressure along the wall. The results have been compared with the existing values in the literature. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Divakar, S., and E. Prakash, L., “Land Use Exposure to Deterministic Seismic Hazard in Delhi National Capital Territory”, Proceedings of the Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics V. pp. 135-145, 2018.[Abstract]


Indian cities are growing at a faster rate due to urban sprawl and urban dynamics. Delhi is one of the seismic hazard-prone cities in the world located next to the Himalayan range, home of nearly eighteen million. Construction of high rise buildings even in the hazard-prone areas has become common due to high population intensity in major Indian cities. Damages to the livelihood and lives happen only when earthquakes interact with infrastructures and population. This study presents the details of the deterministic seismic hazard analysis (DSHA) of Delhi considering latest available information of seismic events and sources, within a distance of 500 km radius from the outermost boundaries of the city. Earthquake data catalog for the study region was developed by collecting seismic data from various agencies. Seismic event magnitudes were converted into a homogenized unified moment magnitude scale. A seismo-tectonic map for the study region was developed by superimposing the declustered earthquake event on the seismic source map of the region. The study area was divided into grids of size 0.02°×0.02° and DSHA was performed using attenuation relationship available for the active tectonic region. Peak ground acceleration (PGA) values were evaluated for 84th percentile values at the center of each of the grid points. Land use (LU) map for the study region was also generated using Landsat8 data. Hazard contour map, ward-wise administrative map, and LU map for the year 2016 are presented in this paper to revisit the seismic risk prevailing in the region.

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2018

Conference Proceedings

T. G. Sitharam, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Yang, S., and Krishnan, A., “Concept of a Geotechnical Solution to Address the Issues of Sea Water Intrusion in Ashtamudi Lake, Kerala”, 5th GeoChina International Conference Civil Infrastructures Confronting Severe Weathers and Climate Changes: From Failure to Sustainability . HangZhou, China , pp. 238-246, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper presents an innovative concept to transform brackish Ashtamudi Lake into a clean freshwater lake (partially or fully) using advanced geotechnology to construct a dike at appropriate place. This will serve two purposes: to meet water demands of the people and to save tiny islands from the threat of sea level rise. The sea level rise, according to researchers, is of serious concern in the state of Kerala which has a 590 km-long coastline and large expands of backwaters and estuaries and low-lying areas such as filtration ponds. Some tiny islands in Ashtamudi lake like Munroe Thuruthu islands seem to be gradually sinking due to reduced sediment deposits and sea-level rise. Nearby areas are facing frequent and increased tidal flooding throughout the year. The role of proposed project in saving these islands and other low lying areas from tidal flooding and sea level rise are discussed in the paper. Ashtamudi wetland is an estuary filled with brackish water and sewage, which lies in the Kollam district of Kerala. This study aims to conduct a comprehensive feasibility of the concept of conversion of brackish Ashtamudi Lake to a fresh water reservoir by building a barrage at the outlet of lake at the mouth of the Arabian Sea (Neendakara). On one side, it will block freshwater flowing from Kallada River to the lake from being discharged into the sea. On the other side, the barrage will prevent seawater from entering the lake, avoiding the adulteration of the freshwater supply with saltwater. This paper presents three different possible schemes to meet the water demands of Kollam city, Kollam district and entire state of Kerala. The paper also presents the required lengths of dikes for these schemes and suggest different methods of dike construction.

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2018

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, V. Kumar, K., Rohith, V. R., and Priyatham, K., “Development of Mobile Application to Assess and Enhance Earthquake Preparedness Level of Individuals and Community in India”, 5th GeoChina International Conference Civil Infrastructures Confronting Severe Weathers and Climate Changes: From Failure to Sustainability. HangZhou, China, pp. 197-216, 2018.[Abstract]


Earthquake is one of the natural hazards that affected the mankind the most with large scale destruction and loss of lives. According to IS 1893:2002, 60% Indian landmass (Zone V = 12%, Zone IV = 18%, Zone III = 26% and Zone II 44%) is vulnerable to earthquakes and several studies have shown that highly populated states of North and North Eastern India, belong to seismically active regions in the world. There is a need to bring the spirit of togetherness and alertness well before a disaster so that a community can be prepared well to face the disaster and thus reduce the loss of life and properties. This involves building a community that is aware of the earthquake hazards and prepared for it. There is a dire need for effective earthquake preparedness and an assessment tool that can assist individuals and communities to prepare, respond and recover from earthquakes. With the latest technological developments, the effective way of communicating the information required for improving the preparedness levels of individuals towards earthquakes is through mobile based applications. Hence development of a mobile APP is need of the hour. This study focuses on developing java based application which serves as an assessment tool to measure the preparedness level of an individual and community. The information required to be prepared for an earthquake such as latest information about earthquakes, actions to be taken during an earthquake, seismic zones in India are also provided through this tool. This paper also presents a preliminary case study of applying the developed app among the community from south Indian city of Coimbatore to understand the status of earthquake preparedness and awareness among the community.

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2018

Conference Proceedings

L. E. Prakash, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and Ramkrishnan, R., “Seismic Risk Assessment for Coimbatore Integrating Seismic Hazard and Land Use”, Proceedings of GeoShanghai 2018 International Conference: Geoenvironment and Geohazard. Springer Singapore, Singapore, pp. 117-124, 2018.[Abstract]


Indian cities are expanding not only in terms of built environment but also in population. Multi-story buildings are rising rapidly to accommodate the growing population, undesirably even in hazard prone areas. Such a scenario calls for a proper disaster risk reduction program and plan to control the inevitable damage to lives and properties. Earthquakes are destructive only if the factors that increase the damages prevail. Attention should be given to crowded cities with people and infrastructure vulnerable to hazard. This study presents the details of deterministic seismic hazard analysis (DSHA) done for Coimbatore city of the state of Tamil Nadu, India using the latest available information on seismicity of the region. The earthquake data was compiled from different agencies and homogenized in a unified moment magnitude scale to create an updated earthquake catalog. Seismotectonic map for the study area was prepared by superimposing the earthquake events on the seismogenic sources. DSHA was then performed by dividing the study area into grids of size 0.02º × 0.02º (approximately 2 km × 2 km) using a MATLAB code, considering three different attenuation relationships for the stable continental region. Land use (LU) map for the region was developed from LANDSAT 8 data using various GIS platforms. Hazard contour map prepared using ArcGIS, was then overlaid on the LU map to comprehend the seismic risk of the region. It was observed that, though the wards south-west of the city shows higher Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) values, the wards north-east of the city have larger and denser built-up areas, increasing its vulnerability, in the event of an earthquake.

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2018

Conference Proceedings

G. Karthikeyan, Karthic, S., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Experimental Studies on Strength Performance of Subgrade Soil Mixed with Bottom Ash and Coir Fiber”, In GeoShanghai International Conference . Springer Singapore, Singapore, pp. 289-298, 2018.[Abstract]


The traffic loads on pavements are ultimately transferred to the subgrade and the performance of the pavement largely depends upon properties of sub grade soil. It becomes necessary to stabilize weak soils for infrastructural development such as for the construction of pavements. As the natural resources are depleting, limiting the use of natural resources and enhancing the use of locally available materials and waste materials is very important for sustainable development. The present study aims to evaluate the possible utilization of bottom ash (BA) which is a by-product obtained from thermal power plant, along with natural coir fiber as reinforcing agent for a locally available weak clayey soil in Southern India. Various strength parameters like California Bearing ratio (CBR), unconfined compression strength (UCS), Split tensile strength were estimated for soil-BA-coir fiber mixes in different percentages. A small amount of cement (5{%}) is also added to promote pozzolanic reaction. It was observed that the engineering properties of the soil depend mainly on the amount of coir and BA as well as curing period. This experimental investigation recommends the use of coir fiber and BA in combined form to get maximum benefits in soil stabilization. The results of experiments are presented and the suitability of using coir fiber and bottom ash are discussed in detail.

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2016

Conference Proceedings

S. Raju, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and Dr. Anil Kumar Sharma, “Modification of Subgrade Properties using Waste Generated from Sand Manufacturing Unit and Fiber”, International Conference on Soil and Environment ICSE 2016. Bangalore, India, 2016.

2016

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, N, V., Aadityan, S., and K, R., “An Investigative Study of Seismic Landslide Hazards”, Recent Advances in Rock Engineering (RARE 2016) . 2016.[Abstract]


A decade ago, in September 2006, the European Commission sanctioned Amrita University, Kerala, to design, develop, and deploy a wireless sensor network-based landslide monitoring system. The deployment was completed in June 2009, at the Anthoniar Colony Landslide in Munnar, Kerala, and the system has been in successful operation since then. Recently, the Government of India commissioned Amrita University to deploy a similar landslide monitoring system in the Himalayas. We selected the Chandmari Landslide in Gangtok City, Sikkim, as our deployment site. The deployment has been phased in two stages. The first stage, completed in June 2015, was a pilot deployment in which a 33.5 m deep borehole was drilled into rock, piezometers and inclinometers were installed, and rock samples were extracted and analyzed. Soil samples were extracted from elsewhere on the hill and tested. In the second stage, we will instrument other areas of Chandmari Hill, so that the entire region can be adequately monitored. Chandmari lies in a seismically active zone and has experienced earthquake-induced landslides in the past. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis, considering linear and gridded seismicity models and three sets of ground motion prediction equations, and estimate seismic hazard at Chandmari. In addition, we report, in detail, the results of the Chandmari soil and rock tests. We then describe a method that uses these soil and rock test results and seismic hazard analyses to estimate seismic landslide hazard at the site

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Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, A, A. S., and E, L. Prakash, “Development of Earthquake Readiness Index Tool to assess Individual Earthquake Preparedness Level (Accepted)”, in ASCE India Conference 2018, 2018.

2018

Conference Paper

R. V.R, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, K, P., V, K. Kumar, and S, N., “Disaster Preparedness Index: Development of a Valid and Reliable Tool to Comprehend Disaster Preparedness in India (Accepted)”, in ASCE India Conference 2018, 2018.

2018

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Experimental Investigations and Numerical Modeling on Performance of Natural Geocells”, in 11th International Conference on Geosynthetics. 2018, Seoul, Korea , 2018.

2014

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Unexplored potential of seismic hazard studies”, in Annual Convention on Earthquake Sciences, Institute of Seismological Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 2014.

2014

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Recycling and reuse: Out of box perspective”, in 3rd International Conference on Recycling and Reuse of Materials (ICRM 2014) organized by International and Interuniversity Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kerala, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw, Poland, Kottayam, Kerala, India, 2014.

2012

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Sitharam, T. G., and Vipin, K. S., “Evaluation of liquefaction return period for India and adjoining areas”, in International Conference on Earthquake Geotechnical Engineering, Luxor-Aswan, Egypt, 2012.

2012

Conference Paper

T. G. Sitharam and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Probabilistic Evaluation of Seismic Hazard in India: Comparison of Different Methodologies”, in 15th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Lisbon, 2012.[Abstract]


In view of the major advancement made in understanding the seismicity and seismotectonics of this region in recent times, an updated probabilistic seismic hazard map of India covering 6°–38° N and 68°–98° E was prepared and presented in this paper. In present analysis, three types of seismic sources, viz. linear, areal and zoneless models were considered and different attenuation relations were used for different tectonic provinces. The study area was divided into small grids of size 0.1° x 0.1° and the PHA and Sa values were evaluated at the centre of each grid point. A MATLAB code has been developed to estimate the hazard using linear sources and zoneless approach whereas CRISIS software was used to model areal sources. Comparison of different methodologies is presented in the paper. The linear source model predicts higher hazard compared to other two source models and Zoneless approach gives the lower value of hazard at a particular grid point. For most of the cities, gridded seismicity model is giving higher values compared to aerial sources except for Ahmedabad, Chennai, and Kanpur.

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2011

Conference Paper

K. S. Vipin, Sitharam, T. G. ., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Seismic hazard assessment of Gujarat ”, in International Symposium on the 2001 Bhuj Earthquake and Advances in Earthquake Science, AES 2011, 2011.

2011

Conference Paper

T. G. Sitharam, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and Vipin, K. S., “Probabilistic seismic hazard macrozonation of India”, in International Symposium on the 2001 Bhuj Earthquake and Advances in Earthquake Science, AES 2011, 2011.

2011

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and Sitharam, T. G., “Probabilistic Evaluation of Seismic Hazard in and around Kerala”, in Indian Geotechnical Conference (IGC-2011) , Kochi, 2011.[Abstract]


In view of the major advancement made in understanding the seismicity and seismotectonics of the region, an updated probabilistic seismic hazard map of Kerala and its vicinity covering 5°-16°N and 72°-81°E was prepared. The earthquake catalogue was prepared by compiling the data from different national and international agencies. The sesismotectonic map of the study area was prepared by considering the faults, lineaments and the shear zones which are associated with earthquakes of magnitude 3 and above. The seismicity parameters were estimated for the region and and the hazard parameters (Rock level Peak Horizontal Acceleration (PHA) and spectral accelerations for periods 0.1s and 1s) were calculated considering all the seismic sources within a radius of 300 km. Epistemic uncertainty in hazard has been tackled within a logic-tree framework considering three types of source models and three attenuation models. The contour maps showing spatial variation of spectral acceleration values both at bed rock and surface level are presented in the paper.

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2011

Conference Paper

K. S. Vipin, Sitharam, T. G., and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Probabilistic Assessment of Liquefaction Potential for the State of Gujarat”, in Indian Geotechnical Conference (IGC-2011) , 2011.[Abstract]


The Bhuj earthquake of 2001 is considered as the deadliest stable continental shield region earthquake. One of the main reasons for heavy damage during the Bhuj earthquake was the effects of site amplification and liquefaction. This paper tries to evaluate one of these geotechnical aspects – liquefaction, based on a performance-based approach. The seismic hazard assessment of Gujarat (at bed rock level) was evaluated using Probabilistic Seismic hazard Assessment (PSHA) method. Based on the rock level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) values obtained, the surface level peak ground acceleration (PGA) values were evaluated by amplification coefficients suggested by Raghu Kanth and Iyengar for Peninsular India. Using the PGA values, the liquefaction potential was evaluated based on a performance-based approach. The liquefaction potential was evaluated based on the corrected SPT value required to prevent liquefaction. The spatial variation of SPT values required to prevent liquefaction for return periods of 475 and 2500 years are presented in this paper. The results obtained in this study can be used for macro level planning and liquefaction hazard mitigation of Gujarat.

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2011

Conference Paper

T. G. Sitharam, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and Sil, A., “A study on Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of Tripura state ”, in Tripura Science Congress , 2011.

2010

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, James, N., Vipin, K. S., and Sitharam, T. G., “Seismic Hazard Scenario of Karnataka State: An Input for Planning of Urban Centers”, in Conference on Infrastructure, Sustainable Transportation and Urban Planning (CISTUP@CiSTUP 2010), IISc Bangalore, 2010.

2010

Conference Paper

T. G. Sitharam, Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, and S., V. K., “Evaluation of Seismic Hazard for India: Deterministic Approach including Local Site Effects”, in Indian Geotechnical Conference (IGC-2010), GEO trendz, IIT Bombay, India, 2010.[Abstract]


This paper presents the results of seismic hazard analysis of India (6°–38°N and 68°–98°E) based on the deterministic approach using logic tree approach with different source models and attenuation relations. The earthquake data obtained from different sources were declustered to remove the dependent events and a total of 51347 earthquakes of moment magnitude 4 and above were obtained from the study area. The sesismotectonic map of the study area was prepared by considering the faults, lineaments and the shear zones in the study area which are associated with earthquakes of magnitude 4 and above. For assessing the seismic hazard, the study area was divided into small grids of size 0.1°×0.1°, and the hazard parameters were calculated at the center of each of these grid cells by considering all the seismic sources within a radius of 300 km. Rock level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) have been calculated for all the grid points and the contour maps showing the spatial variation of these values are presented here. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) at surface level was calculated for the entire India for four different site classes

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2010

Conference Paper

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, Sitharam, T. G., and Vipin, K. S. ., “Evaluation of Seismic Hazard for Andaman-Nicobar Region: Probabilistic Approach”, in 14th Symposium on Earthquake Engineering, IIT Roorkee, India, 2010.

2009

Conference Paper

P. Ghosh and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Seismic passive earth pressure with varying shear modulus: pseudo-dynamic approach”, in Indian Geotechnical Conference (IGC-2009) , R.V.R. College of Engineering, Guntur, India, 2009.[Abstract]


Knowledge of seismic passive earth pressure is very much important to design the retaining wall in the earthquake prone region. Using pseudo-dynamic approach, a limited number of investigations have been performed to obtain the seismic passive earth pressures considering a constant magnitude of shear modulus throughout the backfill. Truly speaking, the shear modulus and thus shear and primary wave velocities in the soil medium vary with the depth. However, no significant attention has been provided by the researchers towards the determination of seismic passive earth pressure behind a non vertical cantilever retaining wall with varying shear modulus throughout the backfill. Using pseudo-dynamic approach,
this paper presents a study on the seismic passive earth pressure behind a nonvertical rigid cantilever retaining wall by considering time and phase difference of acceleration in the backfill; and the variation of shear modulus with depth. The results are provided in tabular and graphical form.

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2009

Conference Paper

P. Ghosh and Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar, “Seismic active earth pressure with varying shear modulus in backfill: pseudo-dynamic approach”, in International Conference on Performance-Based Design in Earthquake Geotechnical Engineering: from case history to practice, Tokyo, Japan, 2009.

Publication Type: Patent

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Patent

Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar and CA, A., “A Method for Producing Geocells and Geogrids Using Areca Leaf Sheath (Filed)”, U.S. Patent 2017410376342017.

Technical Reports

  1. Sitharam T. G., Kolathayar S., Preparing to face Earthquake: Lessons for India, Indian Society of Earthquake Technology, 2015.
  2. T. G. Sitharam, K. S. Vipin, R. S. Jakka, S. Kolathayar, N. James, Anita Kumari S. D., Geotechnical / Geophysical Investigations for Seismic Microzonation Studies of Urban Centres in India, National Disaster Management Authority, Govt of India, 2011.
  3. Basudhar P. K., Ghosh P., Dey A., Kolathayar S. and Nainegali L. S., “Reinforced earth design of embankments and cuts in railways” Submitted to Research Design and Standards Organization (RDSO) Lucknow,India, Report No. GE/GEN/51 IIT Kanpur Vol. IV, 2010.
  4. Basudhar, P. K., Ghosh, P., Das A., Kolathayar S., “ Suitability of CBR in design of railway subgrades” Submitted to Research Design and Standards Organization (RDSO) Lucknow,India, 2010.
     

Edited Conference Proceedings (In Book form)

  1. Sarkar B. C., Srinivas P., Kolathayar S., Proceedings of Conference on Water and its sustainability in Mining and other environments, Indian School of Mines and Ministry of Earth Sciences, Govt of India, 2014
  2. Kolathayar S. and Patankar D., Report on Samanway 2012 – National Conference (on Connecting Science and Society) organized by Students Council in association with IISc Administration, IISc Alumni Association North America Chapter, Karnataka State Council for Science and Technology & CiSTUP, 2012.
     

PROJECTS AND CONSULTANCIES

  1. Appraisal of seismic hazard in Delhi and assessment of preparedness level among the community (Internally funded)
  2. Experimental investigations and numerical modeling of sand beds reinforced with arecanut leaf cells and coir geocells (Internally funded)
     

AWARDS/ACHIEVEMENTS/RECOGNITION

  1. Marie Curie Fellowship, European Union (To serve as International Research Staff, at UPC Barcelona Tech, Spain and Visiting Scientist, Institute Geologic de Catalunya (IGC), Mar-May 2013)
  2. Member, Special Committee to prepare guidelines on Earthquake Preparedness, Indian Society of Earthquake Technology, IIT Roorkee
  3. Faculty Adviser to Think India, Forum of Faculty & Students of National Institutes (IISc, IITs, AIIMS, NLUs)
  4. Reviewer of Journals: NASA (Physical Sciences), Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, GeoRisk, Acta Geotechnica, Journal of Seismology, Journal of Earthquake Engineering, International Journal of Geosynthetics and Ground Engineering, Indian Geotechnical Journal, International Journal of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering etc.
     
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