Qualification: 
Ph.D
nlalitha21643@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. Lalitha Nanduri is an Assistant Professor at the Amrita Centre for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, Kochi. 

Dr. Lalitha S.Y. Nanduri received Master’s in Microbiology (2007) from Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur, India with Prof.A.S.Rao Memorial Gold Medal for securing University 1st Rank. She did her Pre-PhD Training at Department of Microbiology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur (2008-09). Later she secured Ubbo Emmius Scholarship, from University of Groningen, The Netherlands to pursue her Ph.D in Stem Cell Biology (2009-2013). As a Post-doctoral Researcher she worked on identification of biomarkers for aneuploidy at R&D Reagents, Miltenyi Biotec GmbH, Germany, as a part of PloidyNET, a Marie-Curie ITN network. She joined Amrita Centre for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine (ACNSMM) in February 2015. She is a recipient of various awards during her academic career including Best Oral Presentation Award at 1st Annual PhD student meeting of the Cancer Research Centre Groningen (2013); Best Poster Prize, Wolfsberg meeting on Molecular Radiation Biology/Oncology (2013); Best Oral Presentation Award at 6th Annual Meeting, Dutch Society for Stem Cell research (2013); Best Poster Prize, and Klaas Breur Travel Award at International Symposium of the Dutch Society for Radiobiology (2012).

Dr. Nanduri’s accomplishments include a thorough characterization of stem cells that rescued radiation-induced submandibular gland hyposalivation. She is a pioneer in demonstrating single cell self-renewal and differentiation/3D organoid formation of submandibular gland stem cells in vitro. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed international journals such as Stem Cell Reports, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Cancer Research and as news articles in local and national print media in the Netherlands.

Her lab at ACNSMM focuses on different aspects of regenerative medicine. One of her main goals is to understand stem cells of the adult parotid gland in order to rescue radiation-induced parotid gland hyposalivation, to help patients suffering with Xerostomia. Her lab also focuses on developing cutting-edge 3D bioprinting strategies for regenerative application.

Research

One of our interests is to understand stem cells of the adult parotid gland in order to rescue radiation-induced parotid gland hyposalivation, to help patients suffering with Xerostomia (DST, India Research Grant). Currently our lab is focused on developing 3D assays for the expansion and differentiation of putative stem cells of parotid gland tissue by using different 3D matrices in combination with molecular cues that govern the stemness.

One of the main goals is to develop cutting-edge 3D bioprinting strategies for regenerative application (DBT, India Research Grant). We are developing biopolymer based inks that would be optimal for 3D printing multiple cell types in the interest of regeneration. We are interested in studying various parameters that are affected during bioprinting of cells.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

P. Henriques Domingues, Dr. Lalitha Nanduri, Seget, K., Venkateswaran, S. V., Agorku, D., Viganó, C., von Schubert, C., Nigg, E. A., Swanton, C., Sotillo, R., Bosio, A., Storchová, Z., and Hardt, O., “Cellular Prion Protein PRPC and Ecto-5’-Nucleotidase are Markers of the Cellular Stress Response to Aneuploidy”, Cancer Research, 2017.[Abstract]


Aneuploidy is a hallmark of most human tumors, but the molecular physiology of aneuploid cells is not well characterized. In this study, we screened cell surface biomarkers of  300 proteins by multiparameter flow cytometry using multiple aneuploid model systems such as cell lines, patient samples and mouse models. Several new biomarkers were identified with altered expression in aneuploid cells, including overexpression of the cellular prion protein CD230/PRPC and the immunosuppressive cell surface enzyme ecto-5’-nucleotidase CD73. Functional analyses associated these alterations with increased cellular stress. An increased number of CD73+ cells was observed in confluent cultures in aneuploid cells relative to their diploid counterparts. An elevated expression in CD230/PRPC was observed in serum-deprived cells in association with increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Overall, our work identified biomarkers of aneuploid karyotypes which suggest insights into the underlying molecular physiology of aneuploid cells.

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2014

Journal Article

Dr. Lalitha Nanduri, M, B., H, F., C, R., E, Z., de, H. G., R.P, V. Os, and Coppes, R. P., “Purification and Ex Vivo Expansion of Fully Functional Salivary Gland Stem Cells”, Stem Cell Reports, vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 957-964, 2014.

2013

Journal Article

Dr. Lalitha Nanduri, Lombaert, I. M. A., van der Zwaag, M., Faber, H., Brunsting, J. F., van Os, R. P., and Coppes, R. P., “Salisphere Derived C-Kit+ Cell Transplantation Restores Tissue Homeostasis in Irradiated Salivary Gland”, Radiotherapy and Oncology, vol. 108, pp. 458 - 463, 2013.[Abstract]


Introduction During radiotherapy salivary glands of head and neck cancer patients are unavoidably co-irradiated, potentially resulting in life-long impairment. Recently we showed that transplantation of salisphere-derived c-Kit expressing cells can functionally regenerate irradiated salivary glands. This study aims to select a more potent subpopulation of c-Kit+ cells, co-expressing stem cell markers and to investigate whether long-term tissue homeostasis is restored after stem cell transplantation. Methods and results Salisphere derived c-Kit+ cells that co-expressed CD24 and/or CD49f markers, were intra-glandularly injected into 15Gy irradiated submandibular glands of mice. Particularly, c-Kit+/CD24+/CD49f+ cell transplanted mice improved saliva production (54.59±11.1%) versus the irradiated control group (21.5±8.7%). Increase in expression of cells with differentiated duct cell markers like, cytokeratins (CK8, 18, 7 and 14) indicated functional recovery of this compartment. Moreover, ductal stem cell marker expression like c-Kit, CD133, CD24 and CD49f reappeared after transplantation indicating long-term functional maintenance potential of the gland. Furthermore, a normalization of vascularization as indicated by CD31 expression and reduction of fibrosis was observed, indicative of normalization of the microenvironment. Conclusions Our results show that stem cell transplantation not only rescues hypo-salivation, but also restores tissue homeostasis of the irradiated gland, necessary for long-term maintenance of adult tissue.

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2011

Journal Article

Dr. Lalitha Nanduri, Pringle, S., ,, Ronald, v.O., and Coppes, R. P., “Isolation of Mouse Salivary Gland Stem Cells”, J. Vis. , vol. 48, 2011.

2011

Journal Article

Dr. Lalitha Nanduri, Maimets, M., Pringle, S. A., van der Zwaag, M., van Os, R. P., and Coppes, R. P., “Regeneration of Irradiated Salivary Glands with Stem Cell Marker Expressing Cells”, Radiotherapy and Oncology, vol. 99, pp. 367 - 372, 2011.[Abstract]


Background Stem cell therapy could be a potential way for reducing radiation-induced hyposalivation and improving the patient’s quality of life. However, the identification and purification of salivary gland stem cells have not been accomplished. This study aims to better characterize the stem/progenitor cell population with regenerative potential residing in the mouse salivary gland. Methods Mouse submandibular gland tissue, isolated cells and cultured 3day old salispheres were tested for their expression of stem cell markers c-Kit, CD133, CD49f, and CD24 using immunohistochemistry for tissue and flow cytometry for cells. Mice were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15Gy and transplanted with cells expressing defined markers. Results Cells expressing known stem cell markers are localized in the larger ducts of the mouse salivary gland. Isolated cells and cells from day 3 salispheres also express these markers: c-Kit (0.058% vs. 0.65%), CD133 (6% vs. 5%), CD49f (78% vs. 51%), and CD24 (60% vs. 60%, respectively). Intraglandular transplantation of these cells into irradiated salivary glands of mice resulted in stem cell marker-specific recovery of salivary gland function. Conclusions Different stem cell-associated markers are expressed in mouse salivary gland cells, which upon transplantation are able to regenerate the irradiation damaged salivary gland.

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