Qualification: 
Ph.D, M.Tech
Email: 
s_arul@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Sanjivi Arul currently serves as Associate Professor at Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Coimbatore Campus. His areas of research include Robotics, Automation and Welding.

Education

YEAR DEGREE INSTITUTION
1986 B. E. Mechanical Engineering University of Madras
1994 M. S. Systems and Information Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani
2013 Ph. D. Mechanical Engineering Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore

Employment Record

  • Lecturer: Tamil Nadu College of Engineering, Coimbatore, August 1986 to Februsry 1996
  • Senior Lecturer: Department of Production Engineering, Amrita Institute of Technology and Science, Coimbatore. March 1997 to December 2003
  • Assistant Professor: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, Coimbatore. January 2014 to June 2013
  • Associate Professor: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, Coimbatore. July 2013 – till date
     

Title of Thesis/ Dissertation

Ph. D. Thesis Title: Process development for surface alloying of bronze with NI/CR using GTA heat source - modelling and validation

Abstract: Bronze is commonly used as a bearing material because of its superior wear resistance. In an effort to improve further its wear resistance, researchers have resorted to adding Ni/Cr. However, the wear property need not be improved for the entire bulk of the alloy, rather it is sufficient for many applications if it is enhanced to a certain depth from the surface. In this work, a surface alloying process using the gas tungsten arc as the heat source has been developed to make an in-situ alloy of Ni/Cr with bronze at the surface. A heat transfer model with an enhanced conductivity and mass transfer model with the eddy mass diffusivity were developed for the surface alloying process. The heat distribution parameters required for the heat transfer model were determined through a vision system based experimental method and the thermal efficiency of the heat source (arc) was determined by a combined experimental and simulation method. Parametric models of the heat distribution parameters and the thermal efficiency of the heat source relating with the process parameters were developed. The heat distribution parameters were dependent on the process parameters, while the thermal efficiency was found to be independent and around 74%. The heat transfer model was used to predict the modified layer and the mass transfer model was used to predict the concentration profile of the alloying element. The models were validated through experiments. The hardness of the Bronze surface increased from HV120 to HV185 in case of Ni and HV175 in case of Cr improving the wear property of the surface. The wear rate of Bronze decreased to one fourth of its value after surface alloying with Ni and the coefficient of friction remains 0.57. The gas tungsten arc heat source is able to modify and enhance the wear property of Bronze by alloying Ni/Cr at the surface and the simplified heat and mass transfer models were able to predict the concentration of the alloying element at the modified surface.

Courses Handled

  • Theory
  • Laboratory
    Advanced Welding Technology
  • Computer Graphics & Visualisation
  • Computer Integrated Manufacturing
  • Embedded Systems for Robotics
  • Ergonomics
  • Industrial Robotics
  • Industrial Robotics & Material Handling Systems
  • Instrumentation and Control
  • Instrumentation and Controls
  • Intelligent Machines and Systems
  • Lean Manufacturing
  • Manufacturing Automation
  • Materials Joining Technologies
  • Mechatronics
  • Medical Robotics
  • Non Traditional Machining Techniques
  • Oil Hydraulics and Pneumatics
  • Power Plant Engineering
     

Publications

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Conference Paper

T. G. Unnikrishnan, Paul, C., R. Sellamuthu, and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “An investigation on the effects of Co, Ti and Si on microstructure, hardness and wear properties of AlCuNiFe based entropy alloys”, in Materials Today: Proceedings, 2017, vol. 4, pp. 178-187.[Abstract]


An investigation was carried out to understand the effects of Co, Ti and Si additions to the AlCuNiFe entropy alloys on the microstructure, hardness and wear properties. The entropy alloy samples were prepared by an arc melting process under an argon atmosphere. Hardness and wear rate were measured using a microhardness tester and a Pin-On-Disc wear tester respectively. EDAX and XRD analyses were also carried out. The entropy alloys showed a high hardness and a low wear rate compared to several conventional alloys. Si and Ti contribute significantly to the increase in the hardness when compared to Co in the AlCuNiFe system. Si tends to form a separate phase due to the effect of entropy of mixing. The results of this study are comparable to those of previous works. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

Shanmugasundaram A., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and R. Sellamuthu, “Investigating the Effect of WC on the Hardness and Wear Behaviour of Surface Modified AA 6063”, Transactions of the Indian Institute of Metals, pp. 1-9, 2017.[Abstract]


The objective of this work is to reinforce Tungsten Carbide (WC) onto the surface of AA 6063 aluminium alloy using Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) as heat source and investigate the hardness and wear properties. Based on number of trials, optimum GTA heat source parameters are finalized with reference to the proper fusion of base metal. It is found that the hardness is reduced after the application of heat. After the reinforcement of WC, the hardness returns back to the base metal value. In order to further to improve the properties, the reinforced alloy is heat Treated. The Microhardness of the reinforced and aged AA 6063 is increased by 50% with respect to base metal. The wear resistance of the reinforced surface is improved by 52% with respect to base metal. Characterization techniques like SEM, EDX and XRD are done and the presence of WC is confirmed. © 2017 The Indian Institute of Metals - IIM

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2015

Journal Article

S. R. Kasthuri Raj, Dr. Ilangovan S., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Shanmugasundaram A., “Effect of variation in Al/Si content on mechanical properties of Zn-Al-Si alloys”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 2723-2731, 2015.[Abstract]


An investigation was carried out to find the effect of Al/Si content on mechanical properties in Zn-Al alloys. Six different alloy compositions were cast with Zn at 60 wt. % and Si varying from 0 wt. % to 5 wt. %. The alloys were prepared using stir casting process and poured into permanent mould metallic die. Micro-hardness, ultimate tensile strength and percentage elongation of the alloy specimens were measured. The microstructure of the alloy without Si content showed the presence of Al rich α-dendrites and inter-dendritic Zn-rich η phases. The addition of Si content up to 2 wt. % to the alloy system showed uniformly distributed discrete particles of Si in addition to the features of the Si-free alloy. However, when the Si content of the alloys goes beyond 2 wt. %, the Si particles formed large clusters. It was found that the hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the alloy increased with increase of Si content up to 3 wt. % and then decreased when Si content increased further. The percentage elongation decreases up to 3 wt. % of Si and then increases. It shows that the Si content has significant effect on mechanical properties of Zn-Al alloy. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

K. K. Suresh, Dr. Ilangovan S., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Shanmugasundaram A., “Effect of zn/cu content on microstructure and mechanical properties of al-zn-cu cast alloys”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 9325-9333, 2015.[Abstract]


A binary Al-Zn and five ternary Al-Zn-Cu alloys were produced using stir casting process by varying the Cu contents from 0-5 wt. % and keeping Al content as constant value of 60 wt. %. It was found that the micro-hardness and the ultimate tensile strength of the alloys increases significantly with increasing Cu content up to 2 wt. % which is due to solid solution hardening of Cu content in Al-Zn alloy. Further increase of Cu content results in the formation of hard and brittle θ phase which weakens the inter-dendrite region and marginally increases the hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the alloy. The percentage elongation of the alloy system decreases continuously with addition of Cu content. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

R. Devanathan, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, Dr. Ilangovan S., and Shanmugasundaram A., “Study On The Effect of Shallow Cryogenic Treatment on Hardness and Microstructure of Gtawwelded Aa6061 Specimens”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 21091-21099, 2015.[Abstract]


The Aluminium alloy AA 6061 loses its hardness significantly after Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). The effect of post welded shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) on hardness and micro structure of AA6061-T6 weldment is studied in this work.The GTAW welding was carried out with different heat inputs by varyingthe welding speed. The hardnessand microstructure were evaluated for as-welded and post weld shallow cryogenic treated specimens.It is found that the hardness of the post weldedSCT AA6061–T6 specimens increased significantlydue to the reactivationprecipitation sequencein the welded region. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

S. Murugappan and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “A study on effect of sub zero temperature cooling on surface roughness of turned EN8 steel rod”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 21549-21563, 2015.[Abstract]


Achieving ideal surface roughness is always a challenge in machining industry. An experimental study was conducted on dry turning of EN8 (AISI 1040) steel rod in two different turning environments namely pre cooling to Sub Zero temperature up to-45°Cand room temperature in dry condition using four different cutting speeds 30, 49, 78, 123 metres/minute and feeds 0.18,0.315,0.4& 0.5 mm/revolution respectively at 1.5mm depth of cut. Dry ice was used for pre cooling the steel rod. The various aspects of surface roughness are studied and a regression model is created for predicting the surface roughness. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

T. S. V. Dheemanth, Rahul, K., Suman, N., Devanathan, R., and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “Effect of shallow cryogenic treatment on mechanical properties of AISI 1018 steel”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 30901-30910, 2015.[Abstract]


In this work the effect of shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) on mechanical properties of AISI 1018 steel were studied. Experimental studies were conducted on the carburized, shallow cryogenic treated and untreated AISI 1018 steel specimens. Carburizing is done at 9200°C, kept at that temperature for 10 hours. Shallow cryogenic treatment (-770°C) is performed on carburized specimen in order to improve mechanical properties. Mechanical properties like tensile, hardness, wear test were performed, it shows improved results on shallow cryogenic treated and case carburized steel material compared to untreated material and non-carburized material. This is due to transformation of some amount of retained austenite (in carburized specimen near case alone) to martensite. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

R. J. Kiran, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, Dr. Ilangovan S., and Shanmugasundaram A., “Study on Effect of Various Cutting Fluids During Turning Operations of AISI 1016 steel”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 16825-16832, 2015.[Abstract]


High cutting temperatures affect the tool life, surface finish of the component and chip formation. In order to reduce the cutting temperature, suitable cutting fluids should be selected. In this work, water, coconut oil, compressed air, mixture of water and oil at room temperature and mixture of water and oil at 0 °C were used as cutting fluids during turning operation of AISI 1016 steel. In addition to this, dry turning was also performed. Turning operations were done using HSS cutting tool at different spindle speeds, while feed and depth of cut were kept constant. The influence of various cutting fluids on the cutting temperature, surface roughness and chip morphology were studied and compared. At minimum cutting temperature, reduced surface roughness and continuous chips were noticed when a mixture of water and oil were used as cutting fluid at 0 °C. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

S. Murugappan, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Narayanan, S. K., “Quality assessment of drilled holes in Al 6063 plate at sub zero temperature”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 31329-31340, 2015.[Abstract]


Drilling plays a key role in machining operation. The quality of hole is measured based on many metrics. Heat created during drilling affects the hole quality. A 11.9 mm (15/32”) diameter hole is drilled in 10mm thick AL 6063 plate at two different environments, at room temperature without coolant and another at-55°C Celsius using dry ice as pre cooling agent. The hole is drilled at nine different combinations of speed and feed using three cutting speeds 25, 40 & 66 m/min and feed rate 0.04, 0.08 & 0.15 mm/rev. Hole quality is assessed based on diameter deviation, conicity, surface Roughness Ra and Rz. The effect of cooling at sub zero temperature is discussed based on above quality metrics. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

S. Murugappan, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Narayanan, S. K., “An Experimental Study on Turning of AL6063 under Cryogenic Pre Cooled Condition”, Procedia CIRP, vol. 35, pp. 61-66, 2015.[Abstract]


One of the major issues faced while machining Aluminium and its alloys is built up edge and hence reduced tool life and surface finish. Turning temperature and friction have to be reduced to avoid sticking and built up edges. This work deals turning of AL 6063 rod at two environments a) Pre cooling to sub zero temperature using dry ice and b) Dry turning at room temperature. Depth of cut is kept constant at 2.5 mm. Turning inserts CNMG 120408 MP TT 5100 and CCGT 120408 FC K10 - 1 were used. Cutting speeds of 70, 110, 175 m/minand feed rates of0.2, 0.315 and 0.4 mm/rev were used. The surface roughness, Ra, Rz, & material ratio Mr1 & Mr2, tool wear are measured. Increase in productivity and cost saving were evident while using CNMG 120408 MP TT 5100 under pre cooled turning environment. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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2015

Journal Article

A. Ramasundaram, Ilangovan, S., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Shanmugasundaram A., “Influence of specimen temperature on wear characteristics of Al-Zn-Mg castings”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 15417-15428, 2015.[Abstract]


Al-6Zn-4Mg alloy blocks were prepared by stir casting process. The wear study was conducted by varying load, velocity and specimen temperature using pin-on-disc wear tester. It was observed that the wear rate (WR) increases with load at a constant velocity. The WR at constant load is less in the velocity range of 1.5 to 2 m/s. compared to the velocity range of 1 to 1.5 m/s. The specific wear rate (SWR) decreases rapidly between 10 to 20 N and marginally from 20 and 50 N. The SWR increases linearly with sliding velocity. The decrease in wear resistance is significant between 10 and 20 N and is marginal from 20 to 50 N. The wear resistance decreases linearly with increasing velocity. The WR decreases rapidly as the temperature of the specimen increases from 50 to 90ºC and further increase of specimen temperature from 90 to 125ºC, increases WR rapidly. The SWR also varied similar to WR versus temperature. The wear resistance of the specimen shows a reverse trend as compared with the WR and SWR. The variation of coefficient of friction (COF) with load, velocity and specimen temperature shows a marginal variation. © Research India Publications.

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2015

Journal Article

N. K. Robin, Dr. Ilangovan S., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Shanmugasundaram A., “Influence of nickel content on mechanical properties of aluminium-boron carbide hybrid composite”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, pp. 32311-32320, 2015.[Abstract]


In this work the influence of nickel (Ni) content on mechanical properties of aluminium matrix composite (AMC) was studied. Boron carbide was used as (B4C) reinforcement with aluminium (6061-T6) alloy. The nickel content was varied from 2 wt. % to 8 wt. % keeping boron carbide as constant value of 10 wt. %. The composite blocks were produced by stir casting method. The flux (K2TiF6) was added during melting process to improve the wettability of boron carbide content in the matrix. The dispersion of boron carbide and nickel particles were found to be homogeneous in the matrix by studying the microstructure using an optical microscope. It was observed that as the nickel content increases from 2 wt. % to 8 wt. %, the hardness value correspondingly increases from 121 VHN to 193 VHN. Similarly, the tensile strength also increases from 192 MPa to 305 MPa. The % elongation decreases from 16 to 9 with respect to increase in nickel content. The tensile strength increases and % elongation decreases with hardness of the alloy. © Research India Publications.

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2014

Journal Article

A. Prabakaran, R. Sellamuthu, and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “Heat transfer modelling and investigation of the effect of pulse frequency and current in pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding”, Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 592-594, pp. 395-399, 2014.[Abstract]


Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)involves several process parameters. In Pulsed Current GTAW frequency of pulse and pulse to time ratio differentiates the characteristics of weld pool geometry of from GTAW. In the present work a simple heat transfer model for Pulsed Current GTA welding was developed and the weld pool dimensions were experimentally verified with AISI 1020 steel. Relationship between speed and pulsed current frequency on weld pool dimension was studied. Weld pool dimension of pulsed and non-pulsed GTAW is studied. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

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2014

Journal Article

R. Radhika, Gupta, S. K., Rammohan, N., and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “Dynamic control of a pulsatile jet propelled aquatic robot”, Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 592-594, pp. 2287-2291, 2014.[Abstract]


Deriving inspiration from the propulsion methods of squids, a pulsatile jet propulsion system is adopted in a robotic model. A squid-like direction control mechanism, which can direct the jet along any direction on a hemispherical work volume, is also implemented. To obtain a suitable robot velocity (Ũv) and a propulsive efficiency (ηp) for testing this mechanism, the stroke ratio (L/D) and outlet diameter are varied and the Ũv and the ηp of various alternatives are estimated experimentally using vision analysis. A Stroke ratio of 3.78 and an outlet diameter of 25.4 mm are found suitable and employed for testing the mechanism. When the jet is deflected by 60° in the horizontal plane, the robot rotates about its centroid, signifying excellent maneuverability. Reverse motion is also demonstrated by removing inlet valves and blocking the outlet through the direction control mechanism. The performance of the direction control mechanism indicates that the robotic model is a feasible alternative to conventional screw-propelled aquatic robots. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

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2014

Journal Article

K. T. Akhil, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Sellamuthu, R., “The effect of section size on cooling rate, microstructure and mechanical properties of A356 aluminium alloy in casting”, Procedia Materials Science, vol. 5, pp. 362–368, 2014.[Abstract]


This paper reports the cooling characteristics of cast components with varying section size. In this study aluminium alloy A356 is selected because it is widely used at automotive and aircraft industries in the form of components with varying section size. This study investigates how cooling rate and mechanical properties vary with varying section size. Experiment is performed that aluminium alloy ingot is heated in muffle furnace and poured in the moulds having mould cavity of varying dimensions. Cooling rate was measured using K type thermocouple during solidification of aluminium alloy. In order to investigate the effect of cooling rate on microstructure and mechanical properties microstructure analysis, impact test, tensile test, hardness test were performed. The results showed that mechanical properties of cast component of smaller section size are better. This is due to fast cooling rate of smaller section cast component make refining of the grain size of the aluminium alloy.

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2014

Journal Article

R. B Chandra, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Sellamuthu, R., “Effect of electrode diameter and input current on gas tungsten arc welding heat distribution parameters”, Procedia Materials Science, vol. 5, pp. 2369–2375, 2014.[Abstract]


The microstructure and mechanical properties of a GTA weldment depends on the physical and thermal properties of the workpiece, the arc efficiency and the area of heat incident on the workpiece surface. In this study the variation in area of heat incident on the workpiece surface is found to be dependent on change in electrode diameter and welding current. The analysis was done by examining the arc parameters obtained during GTA welding process. The arc parameters were obtained by capturing the arc image by using a gray scale CCD camera and it was processed by Sherlock machine vision software. A regression equation was developed by relating experimentally measured arc parameters and welding parameters like electrode diameter and welding current.

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2014

Journal Article

V. Gopi, Sellamuthu, R., and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “Measurement of hardness, wear rate and coefficient of friction of surface refined Al-Cu alloy”, Procedia Engineering, vol. 97, pp. 1355-1360, 2014.[Abstract]


The effect of surface refining process (SRP) on hardness, wear rate and coefficient of friction of Al-4Cu (Cu 4wt. %, Al balance) was measured in this study. Cast samples of the alloy composition Al-4wt% Cu were prepared for the purpose of this study. Surface refining was conducted using Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) as heat source. Microstructural evaluation was done using metallurgical microscope. Vicker's Hardness tester was used to measure the hardness. Pin on disc wear tester was used to measure the wear rate and coefficient of friction under as per ASTM G99. Hardness was found to increase from 55 HV for substrate to 104HV for that of modified layer. Wear rate was found to decrease with increase in hardness. Further wear rate increased with increase in load whereas it remained constant with varying speeds. COF was found to be constant for all test conditions. The heat treatment is found to have an impact on the hardness of the modified layer. The hardness was increased from 104 HV for the as refined condition to 162 HV for the heat treated condition, an observation that was not previously reported in the literature. The results obtained in this study are comparable with that of previous studies. However, the aged samples showed a superior hardness when compared to the data shown in the previous e-beam/laser studies. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. More »»

2014

Journal Article

G. S. Kumar, Sellamuthu, R., and Dr. Sanjivi Arul, “Determination of melting efficiency of mild steel in GTA welding process”, Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 592-594, pp. 139-143, 2014.[Abstract]


In this study, a model for the melting efficiency of Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was developed and validated using experiments. It was found that the melting efficiency increases with current, speed, arc length and electrode tip angle. The melting efficiency is found to be stable with increase in electrode diameter. The results were compared with existing studies. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

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2014

Journal Article

H. G Reddy, Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and Sellamuthu, R., “Improving Surface Hardness of Mild Steel Plates by Addition of Silicon Carbide Using Gas Tungsten Arc as Heat Source”, Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 592–594, pp. 879–882, 2014.[Abstract]


An attempt has been made to improve the surface hardness property of mild steel by developing a composite layer on the surface of mild steel using gas tungsten arc as heat source. Silicon Carbide was placed on the surface using a binder and heat was applied using gas tungsten arc. Variation of Silicon content with the weld current parameters was studied. The variation of microhardness with Silicon content on the surface was studied. Optimum parameter for attaining maximum surface hardness property using GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) has been found.

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2014

Journal Article

P. D. P. R. Ha Vardhan, .Dheepak, S., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and .T.Aditya3, P., “Development Of Automated Aerial Pesticide Sprayer”, IJRET: International Journal of Research in Engineering and Technology , vol. 3, pp. 856–861, 2014.[Abstract]


The World Health Organization estimates that there are 3 million cases of pesticide poison in each year and up to 220,000 deaths, primarily in developing countries. Organophosphates and carbonates, affect the nervous system. Others may irritate the skin or eyes. Some pesticides maybe carcinogens Others may affect the hormone or endocrine system in the body. Children, and indeed any young and developing organisms, are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of pesticides. Even very low levels of exposure during development may have adverse health effects. Pesticide exposure can cause a range of neurological health effects such as memory loss, loss of coordination, reduced speed of response to stimuli, reduced visual ability, altered or uncontrollable mood and general behavior, and reduced motor skills. An Automated Aerial Pesticide Sprayer is a basically a combination of a Blimp on a Quad copter frame. This project is to mainly overcome the ill-effects of pesticides on human beings(manual pesticide sprayers) and also to cover larger areas of fields while spraying pesticides in a short span of time when compared to a manual sprayer.

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2014

Journal Article

A. M. Xavior, Yarlagadda, P. K. D. V., Akhil, K. T., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and R. Sellamuthu, “The Effect of Heat Treatment and Aging Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Aluminium Alloy Sections in Casting”, Procedia Engineering - Part of special issue: 12th Global Congress on Manufacturing and Management, vol. 97, pp. 1676 - 1682, 2014.[Abstract]


Aluminium A356 alloy is widely used at automobile and aircraft industries in the form of cast component with varying section size. This study investigates how the microstructure and mechanical properties of different section size vary before and after heat treatment and aging processes. Aluminium ingot is melted using a furnace and poured in to the mold having mold cavities of varying dimensions. Cast components are heat treated as per ASTM standard B917-01 at a temperature of 537°C for 12hours followed by a temperature of 155° for 5hours. In order to investigate the effect of heat treatment and aging processes microstructure and mechanical properties such as impact strength, hardness, and tensile strength were analysed as-cast condition and after heat treatment and aging process. More »»

2013

Journal Article

Dr. Sanjivi Arul and R. Sellamuthu, “Development of a regression model relating experimentally measured arc parameters and gas tungsten arc welding process variables”, International Journal of Computational Materials Science and Surface Engineering, vol. 5, pp. 177-188, 2013.[Abstract]


In order to solve the heat transfer model of GTA welding process, the physical and the thermal properties of the workpiece, the heat source efficiency and the area of heat incident on the workpiece surface are required. In this work, the arc dimensions were measured experimentally with respect to current, speed, electrode tip angle and electrode distance for autogenous GTA welding. The arc parameters were fitted against welding variables using regression analysis. The projected arc area is found to increase with current and electrode distance and to decrease with electrode tip angle whereas it is found to be independent of speed. The shape of the projected arc area is observed to be semi-circular in the front and semi-elliptical in the rear for moving heat source. The regression equation developed can be readily applied in estimating the area of heat incident for solving the heat transfer equation. Copyright © 2013 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

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2011

Journal Article

Dr. Sanjivi Arul and Sellamuthu, R., “Application of a simplified simulation method to the determination of arc efficiency of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and experimental validation”, International Journal of Computational Materials Science and Surface Engineering, vol. 4, pp. 265-280, 2011.[Abstract]


To overcome the difficulty of solving a complex heat and fluid flow model of GTAW for predicting temperature distribution, cooling rate and weld pool geometry, a simplified simulation method has been followed in this study. The arc parameters as a measure of the heat distribution required for simulation were experimentally obtained from the arc images. The net heat flux was determined by the application of a simplified simulation method as opposed to calorimetric/genetic algorithm techniques used previously and validated experimentally. The arc efficiency was calculated as the ratio of net heat flux to the input power. The heat distribution parameter is found to be a function of current and independent of speed whereas the arc efficiency is independent of both current and travel speed. The value of arc efficiency determined in this study compares well with the data of previous studies, confirming the viability of the simulation method. Copyright © 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. More »»

2007

Journal Article

G. K., Dr. Sanjivi Arul, and P.V., M., “A Methodology for Reducing Quality Loss and Rework in a Three-part Selective Assembly-A Case Study”, International Journal on Advanced Manufacturing System, vol. 10, pp. 65–73, 2007.

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