Qualification: 
M.Tech
t_rajesh@cb.amrita.edu

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T. currently serves as Assistant Professor at the Department of Aerospace Engineering, School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore Campus. His areas of research include CFD and Aircraft Design. 

Education

  • July 2009: Master of Technology in Engineering Design (CGPA-8.5)
    Amrita School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore, India
  • May 2007: Bachelor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering (Percentage-82%)
    Maharaja Engineering College, Avinashi, Affiliated to Anna University, India

Teaching Experience

  • July 2009 -Present: Assistant Professor (Sr. Gr.), Department of Aerospace Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham
    Coimbatore

Subjects Taught

SI. No. Topic
1 Aircraft Design
2 Computational Fluid dynamics/Aerospace
3 Computational Aerodynamics
4 Computational Methods
5 Manufacturing Processes
SI. No. Topic
6 Advanced CFD
7 Heat Transfer
8 Mechanics of Fluids
9 Fundamental of Aerodynamics
10 Optimization Techniques

Projects Guided

  • B.Tech: 15 Batches + 2 (current Batches)

Project Experience

  • Ph. D., Amrita School of Engineering (On-going)
    • Working in “Studies on Morphing wings
      • To explore the feasibility of using camber morphing between existing airfoils based on their common geometric features using two different methods:
        • Discrete element method and beam like bending method.
        • Identify the best method to morph an airfoil into another airfoil.
      • Develop a theoretical model and perform computational validation of the model for the continuous morphing wing based on the identified camber morphing approach

Areas of Interest

  • Computational Fluid Dynamics / Aerodynamics
  • Aerodynamics
  • Optimization Techniques
  • Conceptual Design of Aircraft
  • Micro Aerial vehicles(Fixed/Flapping), Micro-propellers
  • Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Aerodynamics

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2019

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., BalajeeRamakrishnananda,, Soorya, V., and Dr. Sivakumar V., “Aerodynamic performance estimation of camber morphing airfoil for small unmanned aerial vehicle”, Journal of Aerospace Technology and Management.(Accepted), 2019.

2019

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Nikitha Narayanaprasad, Yashmitha Kumaran, Sivakumar, V., and Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, “Numerical Analysis of Discrete Element Camber Morphing Airfoil in the Reynolds Number of Conventional Flyers”, In: Chandrasekhar U., Yang LJ., Gowthaman S. (eds) Innovative Design, Analysis and Development Practices in Aerospace and Automotive Engineering (I-DAD 2018), Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, pp. 187-193, 2019.[Abstract]


This paper investigates the aerodynamic performances of an airfoil morphed into another airfoil configuration at a Reynolds number of 3 × 106 using discrete element method. Morphing airfoil configurations were achieved by adjusting three locations along with the chord of NACA 0012. Out of the three, two were chosen at the maximum camber and maximum thickness positions corresponding to that of the target airfoil (NACA 23012). The third position was fixed at 80% of the chord. Six morphed airfoil configurations were generated, and their performances were numerically computed between 0° and 16° angle of attack using ANSYS Fluent v15.0. Spalart–Allmaras and transitional shear stress transport models were used to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of the morphed airfoil configurations. Over this range of angles of attack, morphed configurations were ordered according to three factors—high lift, low drag and high cl/cd. The airfoil can morph from one to another during different phases of flight to give an overall optimum aerodynamic performance. Additionally, the effect of smoothening the sharp corners at the morphing locations is also investigated.

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2017

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Balaramraja, V., and Dr. Sivakumar V., “Aerodynamics of Discrete Location Camber Morphing Airfoils in Low Reynolds Number Flows”, Indian Journal of Science and Technology, vol. 10, no. 10, pp. 1-13, 2017.[Abstract]


Objectives: This paper focuses on morphing the base airfoil similar into that of the target airfoil for the application of small unmanned aerial vehicle in low Reynolds number regime. Methods/Statistical Analysis: In this study, discrete location camber morphing approach was used to achieve the morphing configurations of base airfoil. Discrete location camber morphing method was classified into single, two and three location morphing configuration based on the number of morphing locations. The aerodynamic performance of morphed airfoil configurations were studied at the low Reynolds numbers of 2.5 × 10 ⁵ and 3.9 × 10 ⁵ using XFLR5 - e N method. Findings: The base airfoil for this study was selected as NACA0012. The E 207 airfoil which has better aerodynamic performance in low Reynolds number regime was selected as the target airfoil. Eleven different morphing configurations of base airfoil were developed for this study, which falls under these three classifications. Two out of eleven morphed configurations have similar geometric features and equivalent performance as that of E 207 for different range of angles of attack. These two morphed configurations showed a rise of about 3% in maximum aerodynamic efficiency compared to the target airfoil for the tested Reynolds number. Out of these two morphed configurations, one belongs to two location morphing method and another belongs to three location morphing method. This study also reveals that atleast one morphing location has to be closer to maximum camber position of the target airfoil to achieve an effective morphing. There is a possibility for switching between these two morphed configurations as they have two common morphing locations during the flight. Application/Improvements: This type of camber morphing can be positively applied in small unmanned aerial vehicles to achieve better aerodynamic performance over the entire flight mission.

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2015

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Parvathi M. K., Eswar S., Devi P. L., and Deepak P., “Investigation of aerodynamic performance of MAV with Tubercles”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 14502-14506, 2015.[Abstract]


This paper focuses on the effect of bio-mimetic leading edge protuberances known as tubercles, on MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) wings. Studies were carried out to examine the effect of tubercles, inspired by the morphology of the pectoral flippers of the Humpback Whale on MAV wings with inverse Zimmerman planform of two different aspect ratios 1.00 and 2.00. Equations were developed to design the wing planform geometry, incorporating the tubercles in the form of damped sinusoidal protrusions with control parameters (amplitude, number and damping) to vary the tubercle shape. Using Star CCM+ and Ansys Fluent, the drag and lift characteristics of the models with and without tubercles were analyzed for the Re number of 1.37x10 5. It was observed that the drag and lift characteristics of the wing with tubercles shows lift enhancement in post stall region compared to wing without tubercles.

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2015

Vigneshwaran Krishnamurthy, Nithyalakshmi Venkatraman, Nandita Nurani Hari, Akshay Varaparla, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Computational Study of the Aerodynamics of the Gliding Snake Chrysopelea Paradisi”, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 14476-14479, 2015.[Abstract]


Flying snakes exhibit an exceptional gliding mechanism without any added appendages that can aid gliding. Several studies on the mechanism have shown that the snake performs a ballistic dive from a height and glides through the air at high angles of attack of 35 degrees and above. Research has shown the morphing of their body structure from a cylindrical to a flattened shape with a rounder dorsal surface makes it possible for these creatures to not only perform glide but also various turning maneuvers. In this study, the variations of the lift, drag and normal force coefficients (CL, CD and CN) with glide angle are predicted by solving the three dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flow over the snake during its glide using CFD study. The three dimensional CFD analysis shows that the lift and normal force coefficients keep increasing increases with the glide angle even up to a high glide angle of 35 degrees which helps the snake to counteract the gravitational force. Further, the aerodynamic efficiency of the snake is still less than its maximum value at this glide angle, which is not predicted by twodimensional analysis. This study can aid in applications for security and defense.

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Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Title

2019

N. Bharath Ra T., G. Kumar, N., Suresh, J., Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Srinivas, N., and Sowmya, R., “Effects of cross-sectional shapes on the aerodynamic characteristics of bio-inspired airfoils”, International Conference on Applied Mechanics and Optimisation Published as AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 2134. MBCET, Thiruvananthapuram, 2019.[Abstract]


The gliding abilities of Chrysopelea paradisi is considered the best among flying snakes. During flight, Chrysopelea paradisi assume a cross-section that is favorable for gliding. Unconventional Micro-Air-Vehicle research may benefit from a study of related cross-sections at these low Reynolds numbers (3000-15000). A total of thirty-one cross- sections created by modifying the biological cross section taken at the mid body of Chrysopelea paradisi during glide are evaluated for their aerodynamic characteristics for Reynolds number 3000 and 15000 at angles of attack ranging from −10+ to 60+ in steps of 5+. These observations would hopefully spur further research and interest in airfoils suitable for unconventional Micro Aerial Vehicles.

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2019

S. P., R, K. Ramana, Saroj Harikrishn Gopi, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Turn Control in Wings Inspired by Flying Snakes”, International Conference on Applied Mechanics and Optimisation Published as AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 2134. American Institute of Physics Inc., MBCET, Thiruvananthapuram, 2019.[Abstract]


Flying snakes exhibit efficient gliding performance even though they lack any sophisticated flight morphologies like wings. In an earlier work, a gliding algorithm for non-equilibrium glides of such snakes was modeled. In the current work, this is extended to initiate and control turns. The curvature of the centerline of the snake-like body is varied using an n-chain model of the snake and p-d controllers during flight. Trajectory control through way point guidance is shown to be possible in a limited sense. Two aerodynamic models are compared for their ability to induce steeper turns.

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2019

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Shriram, S. V., G. Pranay chowdary, Sagar, J. T. S. V., and Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, “Aerodynamic Characteristics of Avian Airfoils”, International Conference on Applied Mechanics and Optimisation Published as AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 2134, 1 vol. American Institute of Physics Inc., MBCET, Thiruvananthapuram, 2019.[Abstract]


This paper is focused on four bird's airfoils namely Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl which are extracted from their respective wing cross-sections. In addition to this, the corrugation due to feather roughness of Swift bird is imposed on Seagull. The aerodynamic performance of these 4 avian airfoils and corrugated Seagull airfoil is tested in Reynolds number in the range of 104-105. Seagull and owl indicates better aerodynamic performance in 4 airfoils and analysed how the flow behaviour by tracking the laminar separation bubble. Seagull Corrugated illustrates better performance than seagull in small Reynolds number.

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2019

A. V. M. Kumar, Rajendrakumar, N., Gogineni, P. C., Gopan, N., and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Effect of temperature on the aerodynamics of airfoil in low Reynolds number flow”, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 2134. American Institute of Physics Inc., MBCET, Thiruvananthapuram, p. 020010 , 2019.[Abstract]


This work is focused on studying the aerodynamic benefits of surface heating of airfoil in low Reynolds number flow. Numerical simulations of NACA 0012 airfoil in a flow of Reynolds number 2.5 × 105 were performed employing Transition SST turbulence model. The airfoil was heated at multiple zones and the heat supplied came via two sources: A constant heat source and a time-varying heat source. It was observed that heating the lower nose of the airfoil with a constant heat source shows drag reduction at all angles of attack and periodically heating the same zone gives more significant reduction for 0° to 6° AOA. © 2019 Author(s).

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2019

Saran Kumar Komari, Annapoorna Sreekumar, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “A Genetic Algorithm Approach to Design Aerofoils for Small Wind Turbines”, International Conference on Applied Mechanics and Optimisation Published as AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 2134. American Institute of Physics Inc., MBCET, Thiruvananthapuram, 2019.[Abstract]


A genetic algorithm (GA) methodology to design better site specific or wind profile specific aerofoils for small wind turbines starting from an initial pool of aerofoils is described. The GA methodology generates new aerofoils and quickly evaluates the fitness function of every aerofoil using XFOIL software. While XFOIL has a quick turnaround time, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods are more expensive but have less assumptions. Hence, the suggested GA methodology can be used to quickly produce reasonably good test candidates for shortlisting the aerofoils for computational study. The best four aerofoils before GA and the best four after GA are taken and the top four performers from this pool are identified using CFD results. The results of the CFD study show that while three of the aerofoils after GA have better fitness values than the original pool, one from the original pool is still a comparatively good performer.

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2019

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., V, S., Thayalan K, Parthasarathi A, and Dr. Sivakumar V., “Aerodynamic benefits of flexible morphing airfoil for SUAV”, International Conference on Applied Mechanics and Optimisation, MBCET, vol. 2134, 1 vol. AIP Conference Proceedings , Mar Baselios Campus, Mar IvaniosVidyanagar, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, 2019.[Abstract]


This work is conducted to study the aerodynamic benefits of the flexible morphing airfoil for small unmanned aerial vehicles. The flexible airfoil is divided along its chord and modelled as two cantilever beams. Fluid-structure simulation is conducted to morph the camber of the flexible airfoil and to generate the morphed airfoil geometries. Seven morphed airfoils of varying camber are generated and numerically tested in the operating Reynolds number of small unmanned aerial vehicles. Under the assumption of steady level flight, suitable morphed airfoils are selected and are found to show 1.74%-14.90% drop in the drag coefficient for the same lift coefficients.

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2017

Saroj Harikrishn Gopi, Divyendu Kishore Valappil, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., and Viswesh Sujjur Balaramraja, “Modeling Non-Equilibrium Glides in Flying Snakes”, 2017 International Conference on Advances in Computing, Communications and Informatics (ICACCI). Manipal, 2017.[Abstract]


Flying snakes of the species Chrysopelea paradisi glide without the use of limbs. These gliders use the speed of free fall and the change in their body shape to generate lift. Despite their lack of appendages, their ability to glide has piqued the interest of many. Hence, modeling the flight of these snakes has received considerable attention in the recent past. Experimental studies have been done in the past on live flying snakes to understand their unusual glide mechanism. Equilibrium glide-in which the speed of the center of gravity of the snake is more or less constant - is relatively easier to model than nonequilibrium glide where this speed changes with time. Flying snakes spend most of their flight in non-equilibrium glide than on equilibrium glide. An earlier model for generating the undulating shape generated realistic shapes at a specified time. However, many parameters needed to be fine-tuned along with unforeseen singularities. Further, it generated the centerline shape of the snake in a plane, but could not consider out of plane undulation of the snake. In the current work, a better model for the undulating motion of the snake is proposed which is extended to include out of plane motion of the snake's centerline. The aerodynamic forces acting on the snake at an instant of time are computed using thin airfoil theory and blade element theory. With the help of these, the velocities and trajectory of the snake's flight path are computed and compared with data available in literature. This model has potential for application in biological and biomechanical study of the flight of flying snakes, study of unconventional Micro-aerial vehicle and physics based computer animation

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2017

Prasanth Kowsik K, Thamizharasan K, Anjana L, Gokul Krishnan R, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Computational Study of Effects of Icing on Wind Turbine Airfoil Performance”, 44th National Conference on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP-201). Amritapuri, Kollam, India, 2017.

2016

Viswesh Sujjur Balaramraja, S. Sankrityayan, E., Sivagurunathan, S. Coimbatore, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Modelling the Undulation Patterns of Flying Snakes”, International Conference on Advances in Computing. Communications and Informatics (ICACCI-2016), Jaipur, India, 2016.[Abstract]


Some species of snakes are good gliders and can travel as far as 330 feet from a height of 15m through air at speeds of around 9-12m/s. They possess a unique and complex aerial locomotion compared to other species of gliders. During glide, the snake morphs its transverse body section into an airfoil-like shape. In addition, it undulates its body in a characteristic fashion. Understanding the change in shape of flying snake due to this undulation is vital for gliding and maneuvering during glide. Previous studies have explained the effects of 2-D shape. Earlier computational studies on a fixed 3-D wing inspired by the snakes have revealed favorable aerodynamic characteristics. In the current work undulation patterns of a representative snake geometry is modelled mathematically and numerically. The generated shape exhibits lot of similarity to experimentally observed ones. By adding the cross-section of the snake to this shape, the 3-D snake geometry at different instances of time during undulation can be generated. Three dimensional CFD study using ANSYS is performed on these shapes assuming quasi-steady flow. The computed average glide angle agrees well with experimental data. This shows promise for the undulatory model proposed. The current work throws a better understanding of the undulatory motion and may lead to advances in the development of unconventional Micro-Air Vehicles and Snake-Bots apart from biomimetics. More »»

2015

Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, Vigneshwaran Krishnamurthy, Nithyalakshmi Venkatraman, Nandita Nurani Hari, Akshay Varaparla, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Computational Study of the Aerodynamics of the Gliding Snake Chrysopelea Paradisi”, 1st International Conference on Advanced Engineering and Technology for Sustainable development (ICAETSD - 2015), vol. 5. Karpagam College of Engineering, Coimbatore, 2015.

2015

Vertika Saxena, Dr. Balajee Ramakrishnananda, and Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., “Simulation of Flow Past a Wing Inspired by Flying Snakes”, Fourth International Conference on Advances in Computing, Communications and Informatics (ICACCI-2015). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., Kochi, pp. 720-725, 2015.[Abstract]


Wings of airplanes, ornithopters and micro-aerial vehicles were inspired by the wings of birds and insects. A flying snake found in South and South-East Asia converts its entire body into a morphing wing which AIDS it to glide very efficiently. The aerodynamics of this species of snake is not well understood. Two dimensional computational and experimental studies of the snake's rather unusual cross-section have been done in earlier works. A three dimensional simulation of the flow over a wing inspired by the snake's body geometry is solved in the current work using steady laminar assumptions. Solutions were obtained from an angle of attack of 0 to 55 degrees in steps of 5 degrees. Interesting features like wake interaction with downstream sections and complex vortex shapes come to light. At low angles of attack, transverse flows reduce the strength of the wake leaving the wing. Gentle stall characteristics with a high stall angle and almost linear increase in drag with angle of attack are noticed. Bending of streamlines indicative of high lift production are clearly visualized at the maximum lift condition. © 2015 IEEE.

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2014

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., R. Narayan, A., S. Girish, S., Sarath, M. R., and Ananthakrishnan, V., “Design and Development of Flapping Wing MAV”, 6th Symposium on Applied Aerodynamics and Design of Aerospace Vehicles (SAROD 2013). Hyderabad, 2014.[Abstract]


A flapping wing MAV (FMAV) named KAVAS was made in which the potential energy stored in a rubber band was converted to kinetic energy (mechanical) using a simple 4-bar mechanism. Rubber bands of three kinds - conventional, light weight elastic and heavy were used along with along with ice cream sticks, balsa wood, mild steel wire, beads, carbon fiber and tissue paper for fabrication. A parametric study on flapping mechanism gave the relationship between the flapping frequency and the frequency provided by the rubber band to the crank. The flapping frequency of the wing during flight was measured to be 6.15Hz. It was estimated that 25% of the rubber band energy was used and that the forward velocity of the model was experimentally found to be 2.8m/s. The figure of 8 trajectory followed by the wingtip was revealed, demonstrating the flexibility of the wing. The aerodynamic parameters of the final model were evaluated using the DeLaurier’s strip theory with a modification to account for the relatively high maximum flap angle of greater than 20 degrees. It was theoretically predicted that the dynamic twist should be 3 degrees/cm and the angle between flapping axis and the free stream should be 9 degrees to produce the required thrust and lift. Based on this, instantaneous lift and thrust over a cycle were plotted. Effects of using different wing and tail material were also studied.

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2011

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Ananth, R., Nair, C., Das, V., and Ravindran, V., “Design,Testing and Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine”, Symposium on Applied Aerodynamics and Design of Aerospace Vehicle. Bangalore, 2011.[Abstract]


This paper presents a work aimed to design, fabricate and test a fixed pitch, helical vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) in a 2x3 ft low speed wind tunnel. Since the performance was not found to be satisfactory, a CFD verification to find the root cause was undertaken. The plausible reasons for performance degradation were inferred. Due to the lack of sufficient design details in literature pertaining to the helical blade, the Simple Blade Element Momentum Theory, based on steady state aerodynamics, was adopted. The maximum dimension of the model such height and a maximum diameter of rotation was set as 180 mm and 160 mm respectively, by considering the wind tunnel constraint. The optimum design wind speed was set to be 3 m/s, by gathering the statistical data observed from weather forecast station. The unavailability of low rpm sensitive generators resulted in the choice of two DC brushless motors, which were only 16-17% efficient as generators and design rpm was set to 1500. An Althus and Wortmann design, FX 66-S-196 V1 [1], was chosen as the airfoil section [2].The blades, three in number, are helically wound from the top to the bottom flat frames with a total twist of 30°. The blade was designed with a cambered airfoil, as opposed to the symmetric ones generally in use .The VAWT was then modelled using Solid Edge V20 and Unigraphics NX. This was followed by fabrication using the SLA (Stereo-lithography) technique with ABS plastic (Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). In Wind tunnel testing, a high start-up speed of 14.36 m/s and a negligible power generation was observed, demonstrating the high inertia of the set-up. The performance degradation can be attributed to the choice of chord, resultant thickness of the airfoil, and the wake which was not accounted in the simple BEM theory used for the design. The situation demanded a CFD analysis. The CFD analysis in FLUENT 6.3.26 comprised of three phases: 2D analysis of the airfoil, 2D and 3D analysis of the VAWT. The 2D simulation of airfoil showed a major difference in data from those obtained from an airfoil database [1]. The unavailability of experimental data for airfoils at low Reynolds numbers is thus concluded as the first factor for the experimental performance of the designed VAWT. The 2D analysis characterized the wake developed over a range of RPMs. The number of vortices reduced as the RPM was increased; however, the intensity of the low pressure region at the centre showed an increase. The 3D simulation of VAWT showed the change in orientation of lift along the span of the blades over different azimuthal angles of rotation. It was seen that only one blade generated lift at a time, with the other two undergoing dynamic stall, thereby confirming the theory that the airfoil in the upwind condition is responsible for the lift generation and consequent torque production for the turbine. Thus, a fixed pitch, helical VAWT has been designed, modeled, fabricated, wind tunnel-tested, and analysed using CFD. The reasons for performance degradation were discussed.

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2011

Rajesh Senthil Kumar T., Karthick, C., Krithika, R., Naveen, B., Sudhaa, J., and Vimalraj, A., “Design and Analysis of Micro Propeller and Wing Planform for Micro Flyers”, 5th Symposium on Applied Aerodynamics and Design of Aerospace Vehicles (SAROD 2011). Bangalore, 2011.[Abstract]


The aim of this paper is to theoretically design and computationally model a micro propeller in order to maximize the propulsive efficiency of the MAV and to design an MAV wing planform considering the propeller-wing interaction. The dimension of the micro propeller was set as 4.7” x 2.7” (12cm x 7cm) and the design advance ratio was set to 0.54. The theoretical design for micro propeller was done based on combined blade element and momentum theory. A maximum efficiency of 96% was achieved with thrust of 1N. CFD analysis was carried out to simulate the flow over the propeller, and to estimate the losses and the efficiency degradation due to viscous effects, compressibility effects, and wake interactions. Two micro propellers, with NACA 4412 airfoil as cross section, were modeled in Unigraphics NX; one without a hub and one with a hub of diameter 15 mm. An unstructured 3D mesh was generated around the propeller using GAMBIT 2.4 and analyzed in FLUENT 6.3.26 using a single rotating reference frame. A two equation k-epsilon model was used for analysis. The loss in the efficiency of the propeller was studied. An estimate is also presented to account for the hub interaction. Zimmerman planform with an aspect ratio of 1.14 was selected for the MAV wing and the dimension of the planform was determined based on the propeller diameter. A study of the effect of slipstream behind the propeller on the drag of the wing planform was carried out. The flow downstream of the propeller comprises of two mixing airflows: free stream and propeller-induced slipstream. The propeller-induced slipstream was pulsating in nature. For level-flight condition, continuous decrease in the drag of the wing planform, due to the decrease in the propeller induced pulsating slipstream was observed.

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Talks Delivered

  • Lecture on Panel Methods” in Faculty Development Programme on Computational Fluid Dynamics at Kumaraguru College of Technology, Coimbatore, June 2011.
  • “Software Workshop for Wind Energy” in Faculty Development Programme conducted in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, July 2012.

Other Activities

  • Academic Mentor for the “Team Amazons”-a team of 5 students, for the international competition organized by Airbus “Fly your ideas” (2012-2013).
Faculty Research Interest: