Qualification: 
Ph.D, M. Pharm., B. Pham.
Email: 
umadevip@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. P. Uma Devi joined as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at Amrita in May 2012. Currently she serves as Associate Professor in department of Pharmacology. She has completed her B. Pharm., M. Pharm. and doctoral degree from Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi. She worked in Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited for 3.5 years prior to joining Amrita. There she was involved in preparing clinical study protocols, clinical study reports, case report forms, investigator’s brochure etc. Her key areas of interest include clinical research. Currently, she is involved in drug utilization studies and is presently supervising Pharm. D. (PB) students in their research project on antidiabetic drugs.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

Merin Babu, Menon, V. P., and Dr. Umadevi P., “Epidemiology and outcome among severe sepsis and septic shock patients in a South Indian tertiary care hospital”, International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 9, p. 256, 2017.[Abstract]


Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the prevalence of severe sepsis and septic shock and evaluate its outcome.Methods: This was a prospective, observational study, in which adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Relevant information was collected from medical records and the hospital information system.Results: A total of 250 patients [mean age 57.2 y (range: 18 to 98 y)] was studied. The majority of the patients suffered from severe sepsis (81.2%). Most of the episodes occurred in males (75.2%). Major comorbidities included diabetes mellitus (51.2%), hypertension (44.8%) and chronic liver disease (30.4%). One hundred and seventy-eight patients (147 patients with severe sepsis and 31 patients with septic shock) had a positive culture with urine being the main site of infection. One hundred and two patients (40.8%) had a monomicrobial infection while seventy-six (30.4%) patients had a polymicrobial infection. Within the monomicrobial infections, the gram negative organisms predominated (54%). The mean hospital stay for patients with severe sepsis was 11.5 d. Mortality was noted in 79 patients (40 patients with septic shock and 39 patients with severe sepsis).Conclusion: The main causative pathogens were gram negative bacteria. Admissions meeting septic shock criteria have a high mortality rate. Hence, it is imperative to identify patients who are at high risk and treat them promptly to reduce serious consequences.

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2016

Journal Article

Remya Reghu, Dr. Umadevi P., Sasankan, V., Puthur, S., and Jose, J., “A microbiological study of diabetic foot ulcer in a south Indian tertiary care hospital”, International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research, vol. 37, pp. 167-170, 2016.[Abstract]


Diabetic foot ulcer is an important complication among diabetic patients and is a significant risk factor for lower extremity amputation. Knowledge of microbes that cause infections will be helpful to determine proper empirical antibiotic therapy. Thus, this retrospective study was undertaken in 150 diabetic patients with foot ulcers who were admitted in the Department of Endocrinology. Patient data relevant to the study was collected using a standard data collection form. Details of organisms isolated and susceptibility pattern were collected from microbiology department. A total of 273 pathogens were identified from 150 patients with an average of 1.8 organisms per patient. Among 150 cases, 65 (43.3%) had monomicrobial infection and 85 (56.7%) had polymicrobial infection. Both gram positive and gram negative organisms caused diabetic foot infections and this study showed a preponderance of gram negative organisms. Among the 273 pathogens, 150 (54.9%) were gram negative bacteria, 104 (38.1%) were gram positive bacteria and 19 (7.0%) were fungi. Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli (12.1% each) were the most common pathogens isolated. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, tigecycline and linezolid were found to be the highly effective against gram positive organisms, whereas amikacin and colistin were most effective against gram negative organisms. The high prevalence of polymicrobial infection highlights the need for combined antimicrobial therapy for initial management. Effective planning of therapy is very essential for preventing the emergence of drug resistant organisms. © 2016, Global Research Online. All rights reserved.

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2016

Journal Article

S.K. Kanthlal, Jipnomon Joseph, Pillai, A. K. Baskaran, and Dr. Umadevi P., “Neural effects in copper deficient Menkes disease: ATP7A-a distinctive marker”, Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease, vol. 6, pp. 668-672, 2016.[Abstract]


Menkes disease, also termed as “Menkes's syndrome”, is a disastrous infantile neurodegenerative disorder originated by diverse mutations in cupric cation-transport gene called ATP7A. This gene encodes a protein termed as copper transporting P-type ATP ase, essential for copper ion transport from intestine to the other parts of our body along with other transporters like copper transporter receptor 1 and divalent metal transporter 1. The copper transportation is vital in the neuronal development and synthesis of various enzymes. It is found to be an appreciated trace element for normal biological functioning but toxic in excess. It is essential for the metallation of cuproenzymes which is responsible for the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and other vital physiological mechanisms. Copper is also actively involved in the transmission pathway of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and its subsequent molecular changes in neural cells. The expression of ATP7A gene in regions of brain depicts the importance of copper in neural development and stabilization. Studies revealed that the mutation of ATP7A gene leads the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative disorders. This review focused on the normal physiological function of the gene with respect to their harmful outcome of the mutated gene and its associated deficiency which detriments the neural mechanism in Menkes patients. © 2016 Asian Pacific Tropical Medicine Press

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2016

Journal Article

S. O. U. M. Y. A. M. A. R. Y. ALEX1 and Dr. Umadevi P., “Prescribing pattern of antidiabetic drugs among diabetic inpatients in a tertiary care hospital”, International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences , vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 78 - 82, 2016.[Abstract]


This prospective observational study examined the prescribing pattern of antidiabetic drugs in diabetic inpatients. The mean age of the patient population (n=104) was 60.9 years. Majority of the patients were male (77.9%) and in the age group of 61-70 years (40.4%). Diabetic foot complications (84.6%) were the most common co-morbid condition followed by hypertension (78.8%). Insulin was the most commonly prescribed drug during both hospital stay and at the time of discharge (95.2% and 91.3%, respectively) followed by metformin. During hospital stay, 77.9% patients were receiving monotherapy. Among insulin preparations, human neutral soluble insulin was most frequently prescribed. Hypoglycaemia was the most common adverse drug reaction reported. The prescribing trend is in compliance to current guidelines. Insulin thus appears to be the first line therapy in patients with diabetic foot complications, which was one of the most common reasons for hospitalization in the present study

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2015

Journal Article

Aa Unni, Jayaprakash, A. Ka, Yadukrishnan, M. Cb, and Dr. Umadevi P., “Drug utilization pattern in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease inpatients at a tertiary care hospital”, International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 7, pp. 389-391, 2015.[Abstract]


Objective: Drug utilization studies provide useful insights into the current prescribing practices. In view of this, the present study was designed to establish the drug utilization pattern in hospitalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Methods: In this retrospective study, all patient data relevant to the study were obtained by examination of patient’s medical records and hospital information system. Results: A total of 237 patients with acute exacerbation were evaluated. The population predominantly consisted of males (92.4%) and most of the patients were in the age group of 61 to 70 y (39.7%). Cough, sputum production and dyspnea were observed in 88.2%, 80.6% and 37.6% patients, respectively. Hypertension (49.4%) was the most common co-morbidity. Candida albicans (16%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.6%) were the most common microorganisms isolated from sputum samples. Majority of the patients were on multidrug therapy during both hospital stay (98.7%) and at the time of discharge (99.6%). During hospital stay, the most commonly prescribed drugs were ipratropium (91.6%) and levosalbutamol (88.2%); antibiotics and systemic corticosteroids were received by 96.2% and 83.1% patients, respectively. At discharge, antibiotics, inhaled corticosteroids, methyl xanthines, long acting beta-2 agonist and tiotropium were received by 94.1%, 93.7%, 92.4%, 86.1% and 56.5% patients, respectively. Conclusion: The prescribing trend observed at our hospital appears to be in concordance with the current guidelines for the management of COPD patients. © 2014 All Rights Reserved.

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2015

Journal Article

S. M. Alex, Banerjee, S., Dipu, Ts, Sabarish, B., Pillai, A., Dr. Umadevi P., and Menon, V., “Meropenem induced reduction in serum valproate level- A case report”, International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 7, pp. 403-404, 2015.[Abstract]


Objective: To report a case of meropenem induced reduction in serum valproate level. Methods: The clinical data of an epileptic patient who experienced a decrease in seizure control due to a drug interaction between valproate and meropenem is described. Results: The patient was a 26 years old male who was a known case of refractory focal epilepsy and underwent surgery for the same. This patient was on five antiepileptic drugs including valproate. On treatment with meropenem for the management of post surgical site infection due to multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, the patient experienced seizures due to decline in valproate level. Increasing the dose of valproate could not control the seizures. However, changing the antibiotics to a non carbapenem controlled the seizures. Conclusion: The present report highlights the potential drug interaction between valproate and meropenem. Physicians should thus avoid co-administration of both these agents. If concomitant administration is essential, close monitoring of valproate concentration and clinical monitoring for breakthrough seizures are necessitated.

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2015

Journal Article

S. M. Alex, Sreelekshmi, B., Smitha, S., Jiji, K., Menon, A. S., and Dr. Umadevi P., “Drug utilization pattern of anti-diabetic drugs among diabetic outpatients in a tertiary care hospital”, Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, vol. 8, pp. 144-146, 2015.[Abstract]


Objective: The aim was to evaluate the drug utilization pattern of anti-diabetic drugs in diabetic outpatients and monitor the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with anti-diabetic therapy. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out in adult diabetic patients visiting the outpatient Departments of General Medicine and Endocrinology of a tertiary care hospital. Demographic data, drug utilization pattern and ADRs due to anti-diabetic drugs were summarized. Results: In the present study, 99 (50.3%) of the 197 diabetic patients were males. Majority of patients were in the age group of 51-60 years (39.6%) and most of the patients (36.5%) had a diabetic history of <5 years. Metformin was the most commonly prescribed drug (68%), followed by sulfonylurea class of drugs (49.7%). Nearly, 42% patients were using insulin preparations with 30.4% using biphasic isophane human insulin. Majority of the patients (58.4%) were on multidrug therapy with two drug therapies being received by nearly 40%. Metformin was the most commonly prescribed drug in monotherapy (18.8%) and glimepiride + metformin was the most common two drug therapy (13.2%). Co-morbid condition was found in 172 patients (87.3%) with hypertension (68.5%) being the most common co-morbid condition. 17 ADRs were observed with hypoglycemia being the most common ADR reported. Conclusions: Metformin was the most commonly used drug. The prescribing trend also appears to be moving towards combination therapy particularly two drug therapies. © 2015, Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved.

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Faculty Research Interest: 
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