Keynote Speakers


Dr. Ramesh Gopinath, Director, IBM Research – India

TITLE:

Cognitive Systems: The New Era of Computing

ABSTRACT:

The Jeopardy winning Watson system that lies at the intersection of many fields - machine learning, predictive analytics, natural language processing - heralds the dawn of an exciting new era in computing: the cognitive systems era. Trends in Mobile, Social and the Internet of Things are each creating exponentially growing waves of data - Big Data, as cloud transforms the underlying agility and economics. What we have learned from Watson and learning systems in general is that Big Data is just a starting point for getting into a new kind of computing in which systems learn, make inferences, create hypotheses and penetrate complexity. This talk will argue that such cognitive systems are going to require an entirely new era of technologies, and we are seeing many of these already, particularly with new approaches to machine learning, natural interfaces etc.

BIOGRAPHY:

Ramesh Gopinath is currently the Director of IBM Research, India (IRL) In this role he is responsible for strategy and execution of IRL's research agenda working in close alignment with the IBM business units locally & IBM Research labs globally. Until October 2012, Ramesh Gopinath was the Director of Innovative Service Technologies at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in New York where he had responsibility for Research innovations in support of Cloud offerings from IBM Global Technology Services. He has been with IBM Research since 1994 & over the years has led the delivery of differentiated value to IBM products and offerings in the areas of speech technologies, collaboration, mobile collaboration and most recently Cloud. Ramesh graduated from Rice University (Phd, 1993, MS 1990) and Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (BTech, 1987).



Misha Pavel, National Science Foundation (NSF), USA

TITLE:

Model-Based Approaches in Support Future Healthcare

ABSTRACT:

Transforming healthcare to be more efficient, evidence-based, patient-centered and proactive (preventive) will require the development of technological solutions in addition to solving many implementation, organizational and social issues, e.g. changing incentives. The success of the technology based approaches will require solutions of many fundamental scientific and engineering problems. In order to accelerate the process NSF together with NIH has developed a program entitled Smart and Connected Health that is focused on stimulating relevant research in key areas including computer science, engineering, and behavioral and social sciences. In this presentation I will describe the joint NSF-NIH program as well as a number of challenges that include gathering of big data through inexpensive monitoring, the development of inference algorithms and economically feasible intervention schemes. I will discuss the aspects of heterogeneous “big data” collected in “the wild” in conjunction with the development of computational predictive models at multiple scales that can be adapted to each individual. I will illustrate the model-based approaches on a small sample of specific problems.

BIOGRAPHY:

Misha Pavel will join Northeastern University in September while completing his appointment at the National Science Foundation (NSF) as a Program Director of Smart and Connected Health – a program sponsored jointly between the National Institute of Health and NSF. Prior to his NSF rotation he was a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, at Oregon Health and Science University. Previously, he served as chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering (he founded in 2001) and as Director of the Point of Care Laboratory, which focuses on unobtrusive monitoring, neurobehavioral assessment and computational modeling in support of healthcare, with a particular focus on chronic disease and elder care. His earlier academic appointments included positions at New York University and Stanford University. In addition to his academic career, Professor Pavel was a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories in early 1970s, where his research included network analysis and modeling, and later at AT&T Laboratories with focus on mobile and Internet-based technologies. His current fundamental research is at the intersection of multilevel computational modeling of complex behaviors of biological systems, engineering, and augmented cognition He developed a number of quantitative and computational models of perceptual and cognitive processes, eye movement control, and a theoretical framework for knowledge representation; the resulting models have been applied in a variety of areas, ranging from computer-assisted instruction systems, to enhanced vision systems for aviation, to augmented cognition systems. His most recent research is focused on technology that would enable the transformation of healthcare to be proactive, distributed and patient-centered. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from New York University, an M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Misha Pavel is a Senior Member of IEEE.



Prasad Jayanti, Dartmouth College, USA

TITLE:

Recent advances on classical synchronization problems

ABSTRACT:

Mutual exclusion and Readers-writers synchronization are among the oldest and fundamental problems in concurrent computing. After the initial wave of research in 1960s, 70s, and 80s, the advent of multiprocessors and the acceptance of Remote-Memory-Reference (RMR) complexity as a meaningful metric of performance spurred a second wave of research that has led to a number of interesting algorithms and lower bounds in the past two decades. Besides describing this progress at a high level, I will go into one or two recent algorithms or lower bounds to bring out the beauty of this line of research.

BIOGRAPHY:

Professor Prasad Jayanti's research is in the area of concurrent algorithms and lower bounds. He studied at Sri Ramakrishna Mission School in Chennai and got a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from IIT Madras in 1984. He then went to the United States, where he obtained two M.S. degrees (in mechanical engineering and in computer science) from University of Delaware, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Cornell University in 1993. Immediately after the Ph.D., Prasad joined the computer science faculty at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he is now a full professor. Prasad was a recipient of the Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship, and won the Distinguished Teaching Awards from the Cornell Engineering School and from Dartmouth College. In 2009 he was selected to be the Inaugural holder of the James Frank Family Fellowship in Computer Science at Dartmouth College. Prasad enjoys teaching math and computer science to students at all levels, from children to graduate students.