Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

National Medical Journal of India, Volume 26, Number 1, p.18-23 (2013)

URL:

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84879314514&partnerID=40&md5=73e937ddd2e17d1d534d337673882a0d

Keywords:

adult, article, attitude to health, cross-sectional study, curriculum development, female, health survey, human, India, integration, male, medical education, medical school, medical specialist, self report, sex difference, smoking, smoking cessation, social class, structured questionnaire, student attitude

Abstract:

Background. Making tobacco cessation a normative part of all clinical practice is the only way to substantially reduce tobacco-related deaths and the burden of tobacco-related morbidity in the short term. This study was undertaken because information on receptivity to integrate tobacco control education in the medical curriculum is extremely limited in low-and middle-income countries. Methods. From five medical colleges (two government) in southern India, 713 (men 59%) faculty and 2585 (men 48%) students participated in our cross-sectional survey. Information on self-reported tobacco use and readiness to integrate tobacco control education in the medical curriculum was collected from both the faculty and students using a pretested structured questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to find the associated factors. Results. Current smoking was reported by 9.0% (95% CI 6.6-12.1) of men faculty and 13.7% (CI 11.8-15.9) by men students. Faculty who were teaching tobacco-related topics [odds ratio (OR) 2.29; 95% CI 1.65-3.20] compared to those who were not, faculty in government colleges (OR 1.69; CI 1.22-2.35) compared to those in private colleges and medical specialists (OR 1.79; CI 1.23-2.59) compared to surgical and non-clinical specialists were more likely to be ready to integrate tobacco control education in the medical curriculum. Non-smoking students (OR 2.58; CI 2.01-3.33) compared to smokers, and women students (OR 1.80; CI 1.50-2.17) compared to men were more likely to be ready to integrate a tobacco control education in the curriculum. Conclusion. Faculty and students are receptive to introduce tobacco control in the medical curriculum. Government faculty, medical specialists and faculty who already teach tobacco-related topics are likely to be early introducers of this new curriculum. © The National Medical Journal of India 2013.

Notes:

cited By (since 1996)0

Cite this Research Publication

K. Ra Thankappan, Yamini, T. Ra, Mini, G. Ka, Arthur, Ca, Sairu, Pb, Leelamoni, Kc, Sani, Md, Unnikrishnan, Be, Basha, S. Rf, and Nichter, Mg, “Assessing the readiness to integrate tobacco control in medical curriculum: Experiences from five medical colleges in southern india”, National Medical Journal of India, vol. 26, pp. 18-23, 2013.

207
PROGRAMS
OFFERED
5
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
CONSTITUENT
SCHOOLS
A
GRADE BY
NAAC, MHRD
8th
RANK(INDIA):
NIRF 2018
150+
INTERNATIONAL
PARTNERS