Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Springer International Publishing, Volume 190, Number 5, p.288 (2018)

URL:

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85045669311&doi=10.1007%2fs10661-018-6672-9&partnerID=40&md5=bbca7053a04d93fc20cc259603b7092a

Keywords:

Contaminants of emerging concerns, Contamination, Developing countries, Emerging contaminant, Impurities, India, Microcomputers, Pharmaceutical compounds, Pharmaceutical contaminants, Pharmaceutical products, Pharmaceuticals and personal care products, Pollution detection, Prioritization techniques, Water quality

Abstract:

<p>Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are contaminants of emerging concern and have been detected worldwide in water bodies in trace concentrations. Most of these emerging contaminants are not regulated in water quality standards except a few in the developed countries. In the case of developing countries, research in this direction is at a nascent stage. For the effective management of Pharmaceutical contaminants (PC) in developing countries, the relevance of PCs as an emerging contaminant has to be analyzed followed by regular monitoring of the environment. Considering the resource constraints, this could be accomplished by identifying the priority compounds which is again region specific and dependent on consumption behavior and pattern. In this work, relevance of pharmaceutical compound as emerging contaminant in water for a developing country like India is examined by considering the data pertaining to pharmaceutical consumption data. To identify the critical Pharmaceutical Contaminants to be monitored in the Indian environment, priority compounds from selected prioritization methods were screened with the compounds listed in National List of Essential Medicine (NLEM), India. Further, information on the number of publications on the compound as an emerging contaminant, data on monitoring studies in India and the number of brands marketing the compound in India were also analyzed. It is found that out of 195 compounds from different prioritization techniques, only 77 compounds were found relevant to India based on NLEM sorting. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.</p>

Notes:

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Cite this Research Publication

Prakash C., S.G. Thampi, M. Kumar, and Dr. Mini K. M., “Pharmaceutical products as emerging contaminant in water: relevance for developing nations and identification of critical compounds for Indian environment”, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, vol. 190, p. 288, 2018.