Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, Volume 9, Number 8, p.AC12-AC15 (2015)

URL:

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84938581356&partnerID=40&md5=98ebcc8ffd947a0a71847579359dc32f

Keywords:

anatomical variation, article, clinical article, female, human, inferior epigastric artery, internal iliac artery, male, obturator artery variation

Abstract:

Introduction: The large number of organs and anatomical structures within the cramped pelvic cavity makes the study of vascular pattern and their variations of much importance in this particular anatomical region. Clear awareness of the vascular anatomy of pelvis is critical in surgeries performed here, which require ligation of the arteries concerned and also because such anomalous origins may cause profuse bleeding during surgical procedures. This is particularly true with regard to the variations in the origin of the obturator artery, while performing pelvic and groin surgeries. Aim: The aim of the present study was to find out the prevalence of normal and aberrant origins of obturator artery and to describe its surgical implications. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on fifty hemipelvises of embalmed cadavers and the origin and course of the arteries were traced and noted. Results: Of the 50 pelvic halves, in 27 specimens, the obturator took origin from the anterior division of internal iliac artery. Remaining 23 specimens showed variations. The origin of the obturator artery was from the inferior epigastric artery in 11 cases, from the common stem of the internal iliac artery and the external iliac artery in 2 cases each, from the posterior trunk of the internal iliac artery in 5 and one each from superior gluteal, inferior gluteal, and internal pudendal artery. Conclusion: The present study indicates that the origin of the obturator artery is highly variable. It can take origin from the stem of the internal iliac artery or from its anterior or posterior division, or from one of the branches of the divisions. It can also take origin from external iliac artery or its inferior epigastric branch. Advancements in diagnostic and surgical techniques in obstetric procedures and urogenital interventions make it essential to have a clear-cut understanding of the vasculature in the abdomen and pelvis. © 2015, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All Rights Reserved.

Notes:

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Cite this Research Publication

A. V. Rajive and Pillay, M., “A study of variations in the origin of obturator artery and its clinical significance”, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, vol. 9, pp. AC12-AC15, 2015.