Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol, Volume 84, Issue 1, p.120 (2018)

Abstract:

<p><strong>INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: </strong>Dermoscopy is being increasingly used for improving dermatological diagnosis. Use of dermoscopy in the early recognition of skin malignancies, especially melanoma, is well established. Of late, its use in general clinical dermatology is growing with the recognition of new and specific patterns in conditions such as hair disorders, inflammatory disorders, and infections/infestations. This cross-sectional survey aims to assess the common patterns of dermoscopy use by Indian dermatologists.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>This was across-sectional survey. An online questionnaire was used to collect data. The questionnaire focused on the frequency of dermoscopy use by Indian dermatologists, reasons for using it or not, and the training they had received on dermoscopy.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the total 150 valid responses, eighty two (54.7%) participants reported that they were using dermoscopy routinely in their clinical practice. Lack of familiarity and lack of proper training were the important reasons cited for not using dermoscopy regularly. Among the dermatologists using dermoscopy, consensus on effectiveness was highest for hair disorders.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Dermoscopy use by dermatologists in India is mainly in the context of inflammatory dermatosis and hair disorders rather than skin tumors. Lack of familiarity with the technique appears to be main factor limiting the use of dermoscopy in India.</p>

<p><strong>LIMITATIONS: </strong>Small sample size is the major limitation of this study. It is possible that a large number of dermatologists who do not use dermoscopy might not have responded to the survey, there by affecting the results and their interpretation.</p>

Cite this Research Publication

F. Kaliyadan, Ashique, K. T., and Jagadeesan, S., “A survey on the pattern of dermoscopy use among dermatologists in India.”, Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol, vol. 84, no. 1, p. 120, 2018.

207
PROGRAMS
OFFERED
6
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
CONSTITUENT
SCHOOLS
A
GRADE BY
NAAC, MHRD
8th
RANK(INDIA):
NIRF 2018
150+
INTERNATIONAL
PARTNERS