The first phase of a 50-bed general hospital has been completed, providing 20 beds. The hospital serves the needs of more than 100 poor villages in the area of Bogadi and has provision for a telemedicine link with AIMS.

The 3-bed, 5.7500 sq ft hospital building is located in a very calm place at Roopanagar layout, in the outskirts of Mysore, 10 km from the railway station and 11 km from the next bus stand. It serves the needs of more than 100 poor villagers in the area of Bogadi.

The hospital consists of an operation theatre and a pharmacy which dispenses drugs to OPD patients. In May 2010, the task of developing the hospital was entrusted to Dr. Vikas. Born in Rajasthan, he studied medicine in Maharastra and received his DNB in General Surgery from Mission Hospital, Mysore.

Besides Dr. Vikas Modi, a pharmacy assistant, a security man and two housekeepers are currently taking care of the center's smooth functioning.

"The main activity of the hospital is conducting health camps in remote areas in and around Mysore district. The patients are mainly villagers, farmers and laborers with their most common symptoms being colds, heartburn and diabetes."

In June 2010, the institution was in the process of establishing a laboratory.

"The patients are mainly villagers, farmers and laborers with their most common symptoms being colds, heartburn and diabetes," explains Br. Ramakrishna, who is in charge of the M. A. Math in Mysore and has witnessed the hospital's development from its beginnings.

For the last three years patients have been paying a consultation fee of Rs. 10.

"The main activity of the hospital is conducting health camps in remote areas in and around Mysore district," explains Br. Ramakrishna.

"Since the last three years, we have conducted 95 camps for 15,000 people in and around Mysore District, most of them in slums, villages and tribal groups. Even in the forests of Nagarhole, camps have been carried out for the elephant rearers and trainers, who would otherwise rarely get a chance to make use of such healthcare facilities."

The Jenu Kuruba and Yerawa, two of the most ancient tribes, have also been able to take advantage of these health camp services.

Dr. Vikas relates a story that illustrates the importance of the health camps. "A poor couple visited the camp, though it was 100kms from their house. The husband, a tailor, was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia. Through the efforts of Br. Ramakrishna he could be sent to AIMS in Kochi to have the surgery done for free."

Dental doctors from AIMS with a mobile telemedicine unit are making their services available to the public.

Plans are in the making for upgrading the institution by the end of 2010 into a multispecialty hospital for General Medicine, General Surgery, Orthopedics, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Pediatrics.

207
PROGRAMS
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5
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
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A
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