Qualification: 
Ph.D

Dr. Maddipati Narsimha Murty is an Adjunct Professor at the Amrita Center for Economics & Governance (ACEG), Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham.

Professor of Economics Rtd., Institute of Economic Growth, University Enclave Delhi-110007, India, Dr. Murty is currently Fellow, South Asian Network for Development Economics and Environment (SANDEE). He was a Ford Foundation Fellow at University of Birmingham, and Research Fellow at London School of Economics, UK, Visiting Faculty, at Institute of Developing Economies, Tokyo, Japan, and Visiting Professor at National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, and TERI University, Delhi. He was a consultant for World Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Crop Research Institute (ICRISAT) and ESCAP.

Dr. Murty specializes in Public Economics and Environmental and Resource Economics. He taught at Delhi University, Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham, U.K, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi,TERI University, Delhi, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, Institute for Economic and Social Change, Bangalore, Madras School of Economics, Chennai, and Jadavpur University, Kolkata. He has published 10 books including 6 books in Environment and Resource Economics, four by Oxford University Press, one each by Cambridge University Press and SAGE.

He has contributed a large number of research papers to national and international journals of Economics and chapters in a good number of edited books. He has undertaken a number of research projects funded by international organizations like World Bank, IDRC, Canada, ESCAP, European Commission and ICRISAT and Planning Commission, NITI Ayog, CSO, Ministry of Environment and Forests, Ministry of Communications and ICSSR of Government of India.

Employment Record

  • Professor Rtd. and Senior Consultant - Institute of Economic Growth,
    University Enclave, Delhi-110007
  • Fellow and Resource Person - South Asian Network for Development Economics and Environment (SANDEE)
  • Head - Indian Economic Service Section
    Institute of Economic Growth
  • Course Director - Diploma in Development Planning and Policy
    1992- 1994, Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi - 110 007.
  • Course Director - Faculty Upgradation Programmes in Environmental Economics
    World Bank Funded Capacity Building Project in Environmental Economics in India.
  • Warden - Institute of Economic Growth Hostel,
    Delhi-110007
  • Reader - Institute of Economic Growth,
    University Enclave, Delhi-110 007, 1982-1993
  • Lecturer - Hindu College,
    Delhi University, 1970 1982.

Visiting Appointments

  • Visiting Professor - TERI University, 2008-2018
  • Visiting Ford Foundation Fellow - Department of Economics,
    University of Birmingham, U.K., 1991 - 1992.
  • Visiting Professor - National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
    New Delhi, January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989.
  • Senior Research Associate - Project on Indian Fiscal Systems,
    University of Warwick, U.K., 1980 - 1982.
  • Visiting Faculty for Teaching in World Bank Funded Faculty Upgradation Programmes Organised by Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research,
    Mumbai, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata,
    Institute for Economic and Social Change, Bangalore,
    Madras School of Economics, Chennai, and
    Jadavpur University, Kolkata.
  • Visiting Faculty for Teaching Environmental Economics,
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  • Visiting Faculty for Teaching Heritage Economics,
    School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.
  • Visiting Faculty for Teaching Courses in Public Economics, Delhi School of Economics
  • Visiting Faculty for Teaching at TERI University, Delhi
  • Consultant : World Bank, Asian Development Bank,
    International Crop Research Institute (ICRISAT), and ESCAP.

Degrees Obtained

  • 1979 : Ph.D.,in Economics
    Delhi University, Delhi
  • 1966 : M.A., in Mathematical Economics
    Andhra University, Waltair
  • 1964 : B.A., in Mathematics, Economics and Political Science
    Andhra University, Waltair

Books Published

  1. Environmental Valuation in South Asia, Cambridge University Press, U.K, 2011, Edited jointly with Priya Shyamsundar and Enamuel Haque
  2. Environment, Sustainable Development and Well-Being: Taxation, Incentives and Valuation, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2009.
  3. Environmental and Economic Accounting for Industry, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2003 (Jointly with Surender Kumar)
  4. Cleaning Up the Ganges: The Cost Benefit Analysis of Ganga Action Plan, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2000 (Jointly with Anil Markandya)
  5. Economics of Industrial Pollution: Indian Experience, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 1999 ( Jointly with A.J. James and Smita Misra)
  6. Participatory Development: People and Common Property Resources, Studies in Economic Development and Planning No.52, Institute of Economic Growth, SAGE, New Delhi January, 1990 (jointly with Kanchan Chopra and Gopal Kadekodi).
  7. Economic Evaluation of Environmental Management Programs, Common Wealth Publishers, New Delhi, 1988.
  8. On Fixing Postal Tariffs in India, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi, January, 1990 (jointly with Raghabendra Jha and Satyapal)
  9. Redistributive Taxation and Public Sector Pricing: Some Theoretical Issues and Indian Experience, Studies in Economic Development and Planning No.51, Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi, 1989

Research Projects Undertaken

  1. Distributional Equity and Optimal Public Sector Prices, 1985-1986, Funded by ICSSR, New Delhi., India
  2. Participatory Development: People and Common Property Resources, 1987-1989, Funded by the Planning Commission, Government of India.
  3. On Fixing Postal Tariffs in India, 1990-1991, Funded by the Department of Posts, Government of India.
  4. Water Conservation and Pollution Abatement in Indian Industry, 1991-1992 , Funded by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India.
  5. Industrial Water Pollution Abatement in India, 1994-1996, Funded by IDRC, Canada
  6. Cost Benefit Analysis of Ganga Action Plan, 1997-1999, Funded by Overseas Development Administration, U.K.
  7. Valuation and Accounting of Industrial Water Pollution in India, 1999-2001, Funded by the Research Committee of the World Bank Capacity Building Project in Environmental Economics in India.
  8. Valuation and Accounting of Urban Air Pollution in the Indian Subcontinent, 2001-2003 Funded by the South Asian Network of Economic Institutions (SANEI)
  9. Physical and Monetary Accounts of Natural Resources as Satellite Accounts for Conventional National Accounts: Accounts of Andhra Pradesh and Himachal Pradesh, 2003, Funded by the Central Statistical Organization, Government of India.
  10. Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Investment Projects in India, 2006, Project Funded by the Planning Comssion, Government of India
  11. India Environmental Outlook, 2007, Project Funded by OECD, Paris
  12. Environmental Valuation in South Asia, Project Funded by South Asian Network for Development Economics and Environment (SANDEE)
  13. Generalizing National Income Accounts for Measuring Green GDP of India: A Review Indian and International Experience, A Report Submitted to Central Statistical Office (CSO), Government of India, (Jointly with Manoj Panda) February, 2012
  14. Resource Sharing between Centre and States and Allocation across States: Some Issues in Balancing Equity and Efficiency, Project Funded by 15th Finance Commission, Government of India, 2019, Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi 11007

Refereeing to Academic Journals in Economics

  • Journal of Public Economics, North Holland
  • Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (JEEM)
    (Journal of International Association of Environmental and Resource Economics)
  • Environmental and Resource Economics
    Journal of European Association of Environmental and Resource Economics)
  • Environment and Development Economics (EDE),
    Cambridge University Press
  • Ecological Economics,
    Journal of International association of Ecological Economists
  • Journal of Quantitative Economics
    (Journal of Indian Econometric Association)
  • Indian Economic Review
    (Delhi School of Economics Journal)

Examination of Ph.D Dissertations

  • Jwaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
  • Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai
  • University of Madras, Chennai
  • Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  • Lucknow University, Lucknow
  • Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
  • Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai
  • Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati

Ph. D Students Guided

  • Chandan Singha, Delhi Univrsity, (Awarded)
  • Mrs. Smita Misra, Delhi University, (Awarded)
  • Mrs Usha Gupta, Delhi University, (Awarded)
  • Ritu Kumar, Delhi University, (Awarded)

Publications

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Title

2018

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Accounting and Measuring Well-being”, in Accounting from a Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2018.[Abstract]


The recent literature on the measurement of sustainable income has developed in two important ways for accounting of contribution of natural resource stocks. One set of studies directly addresses the problem of measuring genuine savings or extended wealth formation including changes in human resource capital and natural capital. The second set of studies uses the extended conventional national income accounting methods for accounting of changes in natural resource stocks and environmental extensions of input-output tables. This chapter describes the methodology of measuring genuine savings for a country and reviews the estimates available for different countries. It also suggests a way forward for measuring genuine saving for India.

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Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2014

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Measuring Well-being and Accounting Prices of Environmental Resources”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. Vol. 49, 2014.[Abstract]


Along the non-optimal sustainable developmental paths of the economy, the choice between benefitbased or cost-based accounting prices for measuring wealth assumes importance from the point of empirical feasibility and tractability. In the context of depletion of environmental resource stocks in the development process, compensatory afforestation of one hectare of forestland or reduction of a tonne of particulate matter emission at margin could be regarded as marginal investment projects. The account price of the resource could be either the present value of costs or the present value of benefits of this marginal investment project. The presence of irreversibility in resource use could be a problem in using cost-based accounting prices. Therefore, an empirically feasible method of measuring wealth of a nation could be to use the cost-based ccounting price in general and the benefit-based measure in the special cases where irreversibility is present.

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2010

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Designing Economic Instruments and Participatory Institutions for Environmental Management in India”, Environmental Economics, 2010.[Abstract]


This paper examines the possibility of using economic instruments, especially pollution taxes and bargaining approaches, as a means to encourage or improve people’s participation in environmental management in India. It provides an intuitive description of methods for designing economic instruments and bargaining approaches. A case study describes the estimation of pollution taxes for controlling air pollution in thermal power generation in India. Another case study examining some bargaining methods that are already in force in India shows their usefulness in controlling industrial pollution. [SANDEE Working Paper No. 48-10]

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2008

A. Markandya, Taylor, T., Longo, A., Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Murty, S., and Dhavala, K., “Counting the cost of vulture decline—An appraisal of the human health and other benefits of vultures in India”, Ecological Economics, vol. 67, pp. 194–204, 2008.[Abstract]


Widespread use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac to treat livestock has resulted in dramatic declines in the populations of vultures across India. This has become an issue of considerable concern as vultures are a keystone species and their decline has a range of socio-economic, as well as cultural and biodiversity impacts. In this paper, we review these impacts and estimate in detail the economic cost of one of them: the human health impacts of the vulture decline. Livestock carcasses provide the main food supply for vultures, and are also eaten by dogs. Dogs are the main source of rabies in humans in India, and their populations have increased substantially in parallel with the vulture decline. The potential human health impact of rabies associated with the vulture decline is found to be significant. This, and a wide range of other impacts suggest that significant resources should be put into (1) testing of pharmaceutical products to ensure that similar situations are not repeated, (2) helping vulture populations to recover through the use of alternative drugs to diclofenac that are of low toxicity to vultures, and (3) through conservation breeding programmes.

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2007

R. Jha, Maddipati Narsimha Murty, and Ray, R., “Dual Pricing, Rationing and Ramsay Commodity Taxation: Theory and an Illustration, with others”, The Developing Economies, vol. 28, pp. 229 - 239, 2007.

2007

S. Chatterjee, Dhavala, K., and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Estimating Cost of Air Pollution Abatement for Road Transport in India: Case Studies of Andhra Pradesh and Himachal Pradesh”, Economic and Political Weekly, 2007.[Abstract]


This paper provides a method of estimation of physical and monetary accounts of air pollution from the road transport. Using the data from the secondary sources and a vehicular survey, estimates of annual air pollution abatement cost for the vehicles (passenger cars, trucks, buses and two wheelers) complying with Euro norms are made for the road transport sector in Andhra Pradesh (AP) and Himachal Pradesh HP) states. The pollution abatement cost of each vehicle comprises the cost of upgrading the vehicular technology and the cost of improving fuel quality. For example, this cost estimate is Rs. 32309.54 million for AP in the year 2001-2002 and Rs. 3688. 72 million for HP in the year 2002-2003 at current prices and it forms 2.134 percent and 5.88 percent of State Domestic Product of the respective states.

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2007

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Kumar, S., and Dhavala, K. K., “Measuring environmental efficiency of industry: a case study of thermal power generation in India”, Environmental and Resource Economics, vol. 38, pp. 31–50, 2007.[Abstract]


Technical and environmental efficiency of some coal-fired thermal power plants in India is estimated using a methodology that accounts for firm's efforts to increase the production of good output and reduce pollution with the given resources and technology. The methodology used is directional output distance function. Estimates of firm-specific shadow prices of pollutants (bad outputs), and elasticity of substitution between good and bad outputs are also obtained. The technical and environmental inefficiency of a representative firm is estimated as 0.06 implying that the thermal power generating industry in Andhra Pradesh state of India could increase production of electricity by 6/ while decreasing generation of pollution by 6%. This result shows that there are incentives or win–win opportunities for the firms to voluntarily comply with the environmental regulation. It is found that there is a significant variation in marginal cost of pollution abatement or shadow prices of bad outputs across the firms and an increasing marginal cost of pollution abatement with respect to pollution reduction by the firms. This result calls for the use of economic instruments like pollution taxes instead of command and control regulation used currently in India to reduce air pollution.

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2007

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “India Environmental Outlook”, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2007.[Abstract]


This paper reviews the recent environmental projections and attempts an analysis for India. The growth rates of labor force, labor productivity and trade are considered as primary drivers of economic growth contributing to environmental changes. The industrialization and agricultural development and the growth induced income inequalities and poverty could contribute to the increased emissions and loss of forests and bio-diversity. The review of environmental projections reveals that that the developing countries especially BRIC countries tilt the balance if they are not direct parties to the international agreements to deal with the global public goods problems. All countries gain by conserving global public goods but the distribution of cost of conservation could be regressive with the people in developing countries feel more burdened than those in developed countries. South Asian region, especially India has an important role to play in any international effort to deal with climate change problems and the conservation of forests and bio-diversity. The median term and the long-term predictions of environmental changes in South Asia by all the studies reviewed in this paper highlight the potential dangers of non-cooperation.

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2006

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Kumar, S., and Paul, M., “Environmental regulation, productive efficiency and cost of pollution abatement: A case study of the sugar industry in India”, Journal of environmental management, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 1-9, 2006.[Abstract]


In this paper the input distance function is estimated for the Indian Sugar industry under alternative assumptions of weak and strong disposability of bad outputs. The estimated distance function is used to make the estimates of environmental efficiency, Malmquist productivity index and shadow prices of pollutants. The technical efficiency measure estimated under the assumption of weak disposability of bad outputs is utilized to test the Porter hypothesis. Marginal costs of pollution abatement functions are estimated for different pollutants of water. Pollutant specific taxes are computed using the tax-standards method.

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2006

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Gulati, S. C., “Measuring Cost of Environmentally Sustainable Industrial Development and Designing Pollution Taxes: A Case Study of Thermal Power Generation”, The Indian Economic Journal, vol. 54, pp. 135-144, 2006.

2004

A. MARKANDYA and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Cost–benefit analysis of cleaning the Ganges: some emerging environment and development issues”, Environment and Development Economics, vol. 9, pp. 61–81, 2004.[Abstract]


This paper while attempting to estimate the social benefits of cleaning the Ganges river in India highlights some of the emerging environmental and development issues in the river cleaning programmes. Methods involving the market and non-market valuation of environmental goods are used to estimate the benefits. The benefits estimated include user and non-user benefits, health benefits to the poor households living along the river, and agricultural benefits to farmers among other benefits. However, the benefits from fisheries, one of the important components of benefits from the river cleaning, could not be quantified in this paper. With the benefits that could be quantified, the program of cleaning the Ganges has positive net present social benefits at a 10 per cent social rate of discount and an internal rate of return as high as 15 per cent. Furthermore the estimates of benefits of river cleaning obtained in this paper provide guidance for designing the policy instruments to raise revenue for sustaining the river cleaning processes in India. A number of different mechanisms are considered to raise the resources for sustaining the cleaning of Ganges. They are a polluter-pays principle, a user-pays principle (with government involvement), a user-pays principle (without government involvement), and funding from the general tax system.

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2003

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Kumar, S., “Win–Win Opportunities and Environmental Regulation: Testing of Porter Hypothesis for Indian Manufacturing Industries”, Journal of environmental management, vol. 67, no. 2, pp. 139-44, 2003.[Abstract]


This paper studies the effect of environmental regulation on the productive efficiency of water polluting industries in India. The panel data of 92 firms belonging to sugar industry of India during the period 1996–99 are used to test the Porter hypothesis of having win–win opportunities for the firms subjected to the regulation. The main empirical result is that the technical efficiency of firms increases with the degree of compliance of firms to the environmental regulation and the water conservation efforts there by supporting the Porter hypothesis

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2002

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Kumar, S., “Measuring the cost of environmentally sustainable industrial development in India: a distance function approach”, Environment and Development Economics, vol. 7, pp. 467–486, 2002.[Abstract]


This paper attempts to estimate the maintenance cost of water pollution abatement measures to the Indian industry using the methodology of distance function in the theory of production. The distance function is estimated using both programming and stochastic frontier models for a sample of water polluting industries in India. The firm-specific shadow prices for pollutants, measures of efficiency, and scale economies are estimated. Estimates show that on average the cost to the Indian industry for reducing one ton of BOD and COD are respectively, Rs 0.246 and 0.077 million. Large differences in the estimates of firm-specific shadow prices of pollutants reflect the use of inefficient water pollution abatement technologies. The relationships between firm-specific shadow prices or marginal costs of abatement of BOD and COD and the index of compliance (ratio of effluent load to sale value) and the pollution load reductions obtained confirm the earlier empirical results of studies on water pollution abatement in Indian industries. The earlier studies have found increasing marginal costs with respect to reductions in pollution concentrations and decreasing marginal cost with respect to the pollution loads reduced by the firms.

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1996

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Fiscal federalism approach for controlling global environmental pollution”, Environmental and Resource Economics, vol. 8, pp. 449–459, 1996.[Abstract]


This paper finds that optimal international carbon taxes are country specific and we can decompose a tax on a domestically produced carbon-intensive commodity into a revenue tax, a tax to control local atmospheric pollution and an international carbon tax. It shows that an institutional arrangement for the world economy similar to the fiscal federalism in the federal countries can be useful to internalize the global externalities of atmospheric pollution.

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1995

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Environmental Regulation in the Developing World: The Case of India”, Review of European Community & International Environmental Law, vol. 4, pp. 330-337, 1995.[Abstract]


Summary Despite the emergence of environmental legislation during the 1970s and 1980s, India currently lags behind in the use of economic instruments such as pollution taxes. The policy of the Government of India to provide subsidies to the larger factories as an incentive to use effluent treatment plants is inconsistent with the basic economic tenet of taxing the polluters. However, given that pollution taxes may be ineffective in controlling pollution by the smaller factories, subsidies to these factories may be justified in order to promote collective action by them to establish a common effluent treatment plant. Collective action involving all the relevant parties (affected public, factories, NGOs and the Government) is being considered as an institutional alternative for controlling industrial pollution.

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1994

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Management of common property resources: Limits to voluntary collective action”, Environmental and Resource Economics, vol. 4, pp. 581–594, 1994.[Abstract]


This paper finds that the voluntary collective action may be an alternative to market and government in the management of common property resources. In developing countries, the people's capabilities to harness the preserved commons and the fairness in the appropriation of benefits from them are the limits on the voluntary collective action. It shows that collective action is possible if an outside agency plays the role of a catalyst in mitigating these limits. It also shows that there can be mutually beneficial sharing arrangements between government and village communities for the management of local forest resources. The standard result that common and state property resources turn into open access resources as population grows also holds good for the natural resources jointly managed by government and people.

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1993

R. Jha, Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Paul, S., and Rao, B., “An analysis of technological change, factor substitution and economies of scale in manufacturing industries in India”, Applied Economics, vol. 25, pp. 1337-1343, 1993.[Abstract]


The biases of technological change, factor substitution and economies of scale in four major manufacturing industries (viz. Cement, electricity and gas, cotton textiles and iron and steel) in India are examined. The translog cost functions are estimated using annual time series data covering the period 1960-61 to 1982-83. The study reveals that technical change has been biased towards the use of labour and materials and against the use of capital and energy in electricity and gas industries. In cotton textiles, the technological change has shown the opposity biases. Significant economies of sclae exist in the production of electricity and gas. Enough evidence of substitution possibilities among factors of production in all the four industries was also found.

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1991

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Technical Change, Factor Substitution and Economies of Scale in Selected Manufacturing Industries”, Journal of Quantitative Economics, 1991.

1991

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Jha, R., and Paul, S., “On Setting Prices for Certain Manufacturing in India”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. Vol. 26, 1991.[Abstract]


Commodities Raghbendra Jha M N Murty S Paul An examination of budgetary policies reveals that second best pricing rules that take into account revenue, efficiency and equity objectives of government and recognise the existence of alternative sources of revenue to government may provide a suitable framework for setting public sector prices in India. In this paper the authors use such a pricing model for estimating optimal prices for certain manufacturing commodities.

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1991

R. Jha, Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Sahni, B. S., and Paul, S., “Allocative Efficiency, Scale Economies and Technical Progress in the Gas and Electricity Industry in India, with others”, The Journal of Energy and Development, vol. 16, pp. 307–320, 1991.

1991

R. Jha, Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Paul, S., and Sahni, B. S., “Cost structure of India's iron and steel industry: Allocative efficiency, economies of scale and biased technical progress”, Resources Policy, vol. 17, pp. 22 - 30, 1991.[Abstract]


This paper analyses the structure of costs in the Indian iron and steel industry. Using aggregate data for the period 1960–1961 to 1982–1983 we discover that the factor combinations have been cost minimizing. Estimation of a generalized cost function reveals that (1) production is characterized by increasing returns to scale; (2) technical progress has, over time, increased the use of some factors and reduced that of others, all else remaining the same; and (3) there exist considerable opportunity for substitution between factors. Several policy conclusions emerge: in particular, the inappropriateness of visualizing a fixed relation between additions to capacity and additional output.

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1991

R. Jha, Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Sahni, B. S., and Dr. Satya Paul, “Allocative efficiency, scale economies, and technical progress in the gas and electricity industry of India”, The Journal of Energy and Development, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 307–320, 1991.

1989

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Ray, R., “A Computational Procedure for Calculating Optimal Commodity Taxes with Illustrative Evidence from Indian Budget Data”, The Scandinavian Journal of Economics, vol. 91, pp. 655–670, 1989.[Abstract]


A simple procedure for calculating optimal commodity taxes, is proposed which takes into account the simultaneous interdependence of taxes, expenditure and price levels/responses. The method also allows for the social marginal utility of income to depend on prices, besides expenditures, in a manner implied by the assumed preference functional form. Illustrative calculations on Indian budget data provide evidence not only in favour of the procedure, but of considerable sensitivity of directions of marginal tax reforms to the data set (rural or urban) used, and of optimal tax estimates to demand functional form.

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1989

K. Chopra, Kadekodi, G. K., and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Peoples' Participation and Common Property Resources”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 24, pp. A189–A195, 1989.[Abstract]


Though relevant in a wide spectrum of situations, participatory management is becoming increasingly pertinent in the management of common property resources. While historically ownership and management of these resources rested with the state, governments' failure to preserve common property resources together with their excessive exploitation for development has led to serious degradation of the environment with the attendant ecological repercussions. Under peoples' participation as an alternative, the beneficiary/client groups are made responsive to the cost of preservation. Such a system makes development with preservation possible and renders the assumed trade-off between development and preservation non-operational.

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1987

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Ray, R., “Sensitivity of optimal commodity taxes to relaxing leisure/goods separability and to the wage rate”, Economics Letters, vol. 24, pp. 273 - 277, 1987.[Abstract]


This paper uses a new labour-augmented demand functional form to calculate optimal commodity taxes for India. The optimal taxes, which are far from uniform, are extremely sensitive to deviation from leisure/goods separability and to variation in the wage-rate parameter.

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1987

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Prices for Public Electricity Supply in India-Efficiency, Distributional Equity and Optimal Structure”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. Vol. 22, pp. 1762-1770, 1987.[Abstract]


Efficiency, Distributional Equity and Optimal Structure M N Murty Formulae for optimal price structures for public sector intermediary and final consumption goods are derived taking into account the objective of distributional equity. Estimates of optimal price structures for public electricity supply in India are made using data from different sources. The estimates show that electricity should be sold at subsidised prices for both final consumption and intermediary input uses in India. However, the rate of subsidy should be less for intermediary input uses in relation to final consumption uses of electricity Optimal price structures also indicate a marked trade-off between consumption efficiency and distributional equity objectives.

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1987

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Horizontal Equity and Choice between Income and Expenditure Taxes”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. Vol. 22, 1987.[Abstract]


Horizontal Equity and Choice between Income and Expenditure Taxes M N Murty This paper argues that while an expenditure tax is superior to an income tax from the point of view of horizontal equity and other economic objectives, partial tax reforms like substituting an expenditure tax for a personal income tax may not be welfare improving. An attempt is made to provide a method of estimation of incidence of revenue policies that affect consumer expenditure (commodity taxes, public sector commodity price-cost mark-ups and an expenditure tax) on people in various expenditure classes in the economy Finally, some estimates are presented of distribution of burden of commodity and personal income taxes in India by household consumer expenditure classes.

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1987

R. Jha and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Distributional equity and optimal prices for the public sector: The flexible coefficients case”, Energy Economics, vol. 9, pp. 46 - 54, 1987.[Abstract]


Pricing rules for public sector commodities are derived for an economy with distributional preferences of government and flexible production structure. An attempt is made to estimate optimal price structure for the electricity supply in India using these pricing rules. An estimate of the cost function of electricity shows that there are increasing returns to scale in electricity production in India which points out an important limitation on the studies of optimal public sector pricing and commodity taxes with constant returns to scale assumption for the Indian economy.

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1986

R. Jha and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Optimal Non linear Income Tax with Interdependent Utilities”, Journal of Quantitative Economics, vol. 2, pp. 213 - 220, 1986.

1986

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Interfuel substitution and derived demands for inputs in the manufacturing sector of India”, Journal of Quantitative Economics, vol. 2, pp. 119-135, 1986.

1985

A. K. Dasgupta and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Economic Evaluation of Water Pollution Abatement: A Case Study of Paper and Pulp Industry in India”, Indian Economic Review , jstor, vol. 20, pp. 231-267, 1985.

1982

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and NAYAK, P. B., “Externality Abatement Technologies, Pigouvian Taxes and Property Rights”, Indian Economic Review, vol. 17, pp. 1-28, 1982.

1980

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “On the Evaluation of Income Distributional Effects of Investment in Less Developed Regions of India”, Indian Economic Review, vol. 15, pp. 139-153, 1980.

1979

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “On the Evaluation of Regional Income Distributional Effects of an Irrigation Project”, Sankhya, D. Series, Quantitative Economics, vol. 41, no. I & II, 1979.

1972

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Opportunity Cost of Public Investment”, Indian Economic Review, vol. 7, pp. 216–222, 1972.

Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Title

2011

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Gulati, S. C., Banerjee, A., Haque, A. K. Enamul, Murty, M. N., and Shyamsundar, P., “Benefits from Reduced Air Pollution in Delhi and Kolkata: A Hedonic Property Price Approach”, in Environmental Valuation in South Asia, Cambridge University Press, 2011, pp. 380–411.[Abstract]


There are a number of empirical studies, mainly in the developed country context, that use the hedonic property prices approach to estimate the value of environmental goods. The study reported in this chapter is the first of such studies in South Asia. Hedonic prices models (property prices or wages) can be used to estimate a variety of benefits from environmental improvements while other valuation methods like household health production function methods or travel cost methods are specially designed to estimate health benefits or recreational benefits. For example, a generalized hedonic price model analysing house prices, travel costs and wages in an urban area can be used to comprehensively measure the benefits from air pollution reduction. Hedonic property price models consider the property price as an increasing function of environmental quality, given house characteristics. Similarly, the individual's marginal willingness–to–pay is a decreasing function of environmental quality – this is the inverse demand function for environmental quality. Obtaining estimates of these functions with these required properties depends upon – (a) good quality data and(b) estimation of appropriate functional forms. This chapter uses data collected through two carefully designed household surveys in Delhi and Kolkata, to show the importance of using appropriate functional forms in the estimation of hedonic property value models. It also provides estimates of consumer surplus benefits to households in both the cities from reducing air pollution to a safe level.South Asia houses some of the urban conglomerations in the world that are worst affected by air pollution.

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2009

K. Chopra, Dayal, V., and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Assessment of Strategies for Water and Air Pollution Abatement in India”, in Environmental Economics, Oxford University Press, New Delhi: , 2009.

2003

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Kadekodi, G., “Fiscal and Institutional Approaches to Pollution Abatement: A Case Study of Water Pollution”, in Environmental Economics in Practice: Selected Case Studies from India, Oxford University Press, New Delhi: , 2003.

2000

R. N. Bhattacharya and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Environmental Regulation and Economics of Environmental Policies”, in Environmental Economics, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000.

2000

Maddipati Narsimha Murty and Srivastava, D. K., “Tax Devolution in Co-operative Federalism: Indian Experience”, in Fiscal Federalism in India: Contemporary Challenges, Issues Before the Eleventh Finance Commission, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi: , 2000.

1996

A. Kothari and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Contractual Arrangements for Sharing Benefits from Preservation: Joint Management Wildlife”, in People & Protected Areas: Towards Participatory Conservation in India, New Delhi: Sage Publications, 1996.

1993

Maddipati Narsimha Murty, Nayak, P., and Datta, B., “Optimal Taxation and India: A Review of Theory and Applied Work”, in Institute of Economic Growth, Welfare Economics, E/148/90 vol., Oxford University Press, Delhi: , 1993.

1993

P. B. Nayak, Maddipati Narsimha Murty, A, B., and Stern, N., “A Normative Approach for Resource Transfers in a Federal State”, in International Seminar in Public Economics, Tax Policy and Planning in Developing Countries, Oxford University Press, New Delhi: , 1993.

1988

R. Ray and Maddipati Narsimha Murty, “Distributional Equity, Optimal Commodity Taxes and Tax Reforms in India”, in Sensitivity Results of Some Simulation Exercises , Anvesak, vol. 18, 1 - 2 vol., 1988.