Qualification: 
Ph.D, MSc, BSc
daliav@am.amrita.edu

Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan currently serves as an Assistant Professor at the School of Biotechnology. She is interested in Plant Tissue Culture and Plant Biotechnology. She was awarded Ph. D. in Plant Molecular Biology from Delhi University, following which she worked as a Research Scientist at the Department of Primary Industries, VABC, Victoria, Australia.  During the tenure, she was involved in the high-throughput wheat transgenesis and also ‘Field trial’ analysis of Tall Fescue, Ryegrass and White Clover transgenics. Thereafter, she worked as an Associate Prof in the Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Hindustan University, Chennai. She also worked as a Guest Faculty subsequently at the Amrita School of Biotechnology.

Education

Qualification Department College
Ph. D. Plant Molecular Biology Department of Plant Molecular Biology

Delhi University (South Campus).

M. Sc. Biotechnology Department of Biotechnology Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi, Kerala.
B. Sc. Zoology (Main) Department of Zoology All Saints’ College, Kerala.

Awards and Scholarships

  • CSIR – National Eligibility Test (NET) (1997).

Teaching

Publications

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2015

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan and Khurana, P., “Wheat biotechnology for herbicide resistance”, Souvenir issue of National Binennial Conference, ISWS . Dept. Agronomy and Agrometerology, PAU, Ludhiana, pp. 7 -15, 2015.

2004

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, Khurana, P., Akella, M., Patnaik, D., Archana, C., and Vikrant, S., “Regeneration and genetic transformation studies in Indian bread, pasta and emmer wheats”, Proceedings of the IInd International Group Meeting on "Wheat Technologies for Warmer Areas". Ludhiana, India. , pp. 152- 157, 2004.

Publication Type: Patent

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2009

Patent

C. M. Ramage, Spangenberg, G., and Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, “Method of producing transgenic graminaceous cells and plants (China)”, 2009.[Abstract]


The present invention provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell, said method comprising: (i) obtaining embryonic cells from a mature graminaceous grain; and (ii) contacting said embryonic cells with a bacterium capable of transforming a plant cell, said bacterium comprising transfer-nucleic acid to be introduced into the embryonic cells, said contacting being for a time and under conditions sufficient for said bacterium to introduce said transfer-nucleic acid into one or more of the embryonic cells, thereby producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell. The present invention also provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant. The present invention also provides a transgenic graminaceous plant cell and/or a transgenic graminaceous plant produced by said method. The present invention also provides a method for expressing a nucleic acid in a transcgenic graminaceous plant cell or a transgenic graminaceous plant. Application Number: CN 200780008777 More »»

2009

Patent

C. M. Ramage, Spangenberg, G., and Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, “Method of Producing Transgenic Graminaceous Cells and Plants (U.S.)”, 2009.[Abstract]


The present invention provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell, said method comprising: (i) obtaining embryonic cells from a mature graminaceous grain; and (ii) contacting said embryonic cells with a bacterium capable of transforming a plant cell, said bacterium comprising transfer-nucleic acid to be introduced into the embryonic cells, said contacting being for a time and under conditions sufficient for said bacterium to introduce said transfer-nucleic acid into one or more of the embryonic cells, thereby producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell. The present invention also provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant. The present invention also provides a transgenic graminaceous plant cell and/or a transgenic graminaceous plant produced by said method. The present invention also provides a method for expressing a nucleic acid in a transgenic graminaceous plant cell or a transgenic graminaceous plant. Application No: 12087634 More »»

2007

Patent

C. M. Ramage, Spangenberg, G., and Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, “Method of producing transgenic graminaceous cells and plants (Europe)”, 2007.[Abstract]


The present invention provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell, said method comprising: (i) obtaining embryonic cells from a mature graminaceous grain; and (ii) contacting said embryonic cells with a bacterium capable of transforming a plant cell, said bacterium comprising transfer-nucleic acid to be introduced into the embryonic cells, said contacting being for a time and under conditions sufficient for said bacterium to introduce said transfer-nucleic acid into one or more of the embryonic cells, thereby producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell. The present invention also provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant. The present invention also provides a transgenic graminaceous plant cell and/or a transgenic graminaceous plant produced by said method. The present invention also provides a method for expressing a nucleic acid in a transcgenic graminaceous plant cell or a transgenic graminaceous plant. Application Number: EP20070701364 More »»

2007

Patent

C. M. Ramage, Spangenberg, G., and Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, “Metodos para producir celulas y plantas gramineas transgenicas (Argentina)”, 2007.[Abstract]


Application Number: P070100125 More »»

2006

Patent

C. M. Ramage, Spangenberg, G., and Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, “Method of producing transgenic graminaceous cells and plants (Australia)”, 2006.[Abstract]


The present invention provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell, said method comprising: (i) obtaining embryonic cells from a mature graminaceous grain; and (ii) contacting said embryonic cells with a bacterium capable of transforming a plant cell, said bacterium comprising transfer-nucleic acid to be introduced into the embryonic cells, said contacting being for a time and under conditions sufficient for said bacterium to introduce said transfer-nucleic acid into one or more of the embryonic cells, thereby producing a transgenic graminaceous plant cell. The present invention also provides a method for producing a transgenic graminaceous plant. The present invention also provides a transgenic graminaceous plant cell and/or a transgenic graminaceous plant produced by said method. The present invention also provides a method for expressing a nucleic acid in a transcgenic graminaceous plant cell or a transgenic graminaceous plant. Application Number : 2006900826 More »»

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2008

Journal Article

P. Khurana, Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, and Chhibbar, A. K., “Genetic approaches towards overcoming water deficit in plants - special emphasis on LEAs”, Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, vol. 14, pp. 277–298, 2008.[Abstract]


Water deficit arises as a result of low temperature, salinity and dehydration, thereby affecting plant growth adversely and making it imperative for plants to surmount such situations by acclimatizing/adapting at various levels. Water deficit stress results in significant changes in gene expression, mediated by interconnected signal transduction pathways that may be triggered by calcium, and regulated via ABA dependent and/or independent pathways. Hence, adaptation of plants to such stresses involves maintaining cellular homeostasis, detoxification of harmful elements and also growth alterations. Stress in general cause excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the plants overcome the same by either preventing the accumulation of ROS or by eliminating the ROS formed. Ion homeostasis includes processes such as cellular uptake, sequestration and export in conjunction with long distance transport. Requisite amounts of osmolytes are hence synthesized under stress to maintain turgor along with maintaining the macromolecular structures and also for scavenging ROS. Another noteworthy response is the accumulation of novel proteins, including enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of osmoprotectants, heat-shock proteins (HSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, antifreeze proteins, chaperones, detoxification enzymes, transcription factors, kinases and phosphatases. The LEAs belong to a redundant protein family and are highly hydrophilic, boiling-soluble, non-globular and therefore have been defined and classified accordingly. The precise function of LEAs is still unknown, but substantial evidence indicates their involvement in dessication tolerance as the expression of LEAs confers increased resistance to stress in heterologous yeast system and also significantly improves water deficit tolerance in transgenic plants. Genetic manipulation of plants towards conferring abiotic stress tolerance is a daunting task, as the abiotic stress tolerance mechanism is highly complex and various strategies have been exploited to address and evaluate the stress tolerance mechanism, and the molecular responses to water deficit via complex signaling networks. Genomic technologies have recently been useful in integrating the multigenicity of the plant stress responses through, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolite profilling and their interactions. This review deals with the recent developments on genetic approaches for water stress tolerance in plants, with special emphasis on LEAs. More »»

2006

Journal Article

D. Patnaik, Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, and Khurana, P., “Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature embryos of Triticum aestivum and Triticum durum”, Current Science, vol. 91, no. 3, pp. 307–317, 2006.[Abstract]


Plant regeneration studies in cereals have been undertaken in immature embryos, scutellum and also in immature inflorescence tissue. The wheat mature embryos can also be employed for callusing and regeneration, as they are available throughout the year and have presently been employed for transformation studies. An efficient and reproducible method for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature embryos of hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tetraploid pasta wheat (Triticum durum) is reported. Presence of acetosyringone at 200 mM concentration in the bacterial growth medium, inoculation medium and cocultivation medium was essential for achieving a 1.5– 2.0 fold increase in transient expression of the introduced gus gene. Successful generation of T. aestivum and T. durum transgenic plants at a transformation frequency ranging from 1.28 to 1.77% has been achieved following 2–3 days co-cultivation using mature embryos and also mature embryo-derived calluses with binary Agrobacterium strain LBA4404 (pBI101 :: Act1) and LBA4404 (p35SGUSINT) respectively. Paromomycin and phosphinothricin served as effective selection agents as they did not adversely affect plantlet regeneration. Successful integration as well as inheritance of the transgene was confirmed by Southern hybridization and PCR amplification in T0 as well as T1 generation. Optimization of this method facilitated the introduction of bar gene as a selectable marker conferring herbicide resistance as well as potato proteinase inhibitor gene (pin2) for insect resistance into wheat. More »»

2005

Journal Article

Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan and Khurana, P., “New paradigms towards appraising plant parasitic nematodes infestation with special emphasis on Cereal Cyst Nematode (Heterodera avenae)”, Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants. , vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 33-50, 2005.[Abstract]


Plant parasitic nematodes are obligate parasitic round worms belonging to the phylum Nematoda. They cause extensive agricultural crop damage and therefore strategies to control their population involve various approaches. The conventional strategies entail the use of plant based products, while physical strategies necessitates effective farmland practices-such as crop rotation, solarization etc. Moreover the use of hazardous chemicals has proved futile in curtailing the exacerbated damage caused by the nematodes, therefore necessitating the need for new paradigms to confront the menace. Breeding involves pyramiding genes towards conferring resistance to certain pathotypes is promising and effective but is a long drawn out process and therefore Genetic engineering offers a ray of new hope to combat the nuisance. However engineering resistance has its own drawbacks and should be adopted keeping in mind is shortcomings as extensive farming may break resistance offered by the transgenics towards a particular pathotype. Therefore opportunities towards evaluation of the nematode resistance mechanism in plants should be viewed in a broader perspective to address the effectiveness of the various strategies. More »»

2005

Journal Article

Dr. Dalia Vishnudasan, Tripathi, M. N., Rao, U., and Khurana, P., “Assessment of Nematode Resistance in Wheat Transgenic Plants Expressing Potato Proteinase Inhibitor (PIN2) Gene”, Transgenic Research, vol. 14, pp. 665–675, 2005.[Abstract]


Serine proteinase inhibitors (IP's) are proteins found naturally in a wide range of plants with a significant role in the natural defense system of plants against herbivores. The question addressed in the present study involves assessing the ability of the serine proteinase inhibitor in combating nematode infestation. The present study involves engineering a plant serine proteinase inhibitor (pin2) gene into T. durum PDW215 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to combat cereal cyst nematode (Heterodera avenae) infestation. Putative T0 transformants were screened and positive segregating lines analysed further for the study of the stable integration, expression and segregation of the genes. PCR, Southern analysis along with bar gene expression studies corroborate the stable integration pattern of the respective genes. The transformation efficiency is 3{%}, while the frequency of escapes was 35.71{%}. $\chi$2 analysis reveals the stable integration and segregation of the genes in both the T1 and T2 progeny lines. The PIN2 systemic expression confers satisfactory nematode resistance. The correlation analysis suggests that at p < 0.05 level of significance the relative proteinase inhibitor (PI) values show a direct positive correlation vis-à-vis plant height, plant seed weight and also the seed number.

More »»
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