Qualification: 
Ph.D
r_krishnaprasad@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Krishna Prasad R. currently serves as Assistant Professor at department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, Coimbatore Campus.

AFFILIATIONS

QUALIFICATIONS

YEAR DEGREE/PROGRAM INSTITUTION
2009 Ph. D. in Chemical Engineering SASTRA University, Thanjavur
2004 M. B. A., Human Resources Annamalai University
2001 M. Tech. in Chemical Engineering Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore 
1999 B. Tech. in Chemical Engineering Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore 

CERTIFICATES, AWARDS, HONORS, AND SOCIETIES

  • Biographical profile is available in Marquis Who’s Who in the World, USA.
  • Journal Reviewer in Chemical Engineering Journal, Desalination, Waste Management, Chemical Engineering Communication and Journal of Hazardous Materials.
  • Life Associate Member of Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers (IIChE), Calcutta
  • Member of Indian Society of Technical Education (ISTE), New Delhi
  • Member of Green Chemistry Network Center (GCNC), New Delhi
  • Advanced Diploma in Application & Programming Techniques (ADAPT) from Bhari Information Technology Systems Pvt. Ltd, Coimbatore.
  • Diploma in Production Management from All India Institute of Management Studies (AIIMAS), Chennai
  • Diploma in Industrial Safety & Security from Management Studies Promotion Institute (MSPI), New Delhi
  • Diploma in Export Management from Management Studies Promotion Institute (MSPI), New Delhi

Research

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Current research areas include: Environmental Engineering, Alternate Fuels (Biodiesel), Enzymatic & Chemical Pulp Delignification and Characterization of Nanocomposites.

PROJECTS

  • Co- Developer of the course Chemical Process Technology under National Mission Project on Education through ICT, Pedagogy Project for developing suitable pedagogical methods for various classes intellectual calibers and research in e-learning.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

A. A. Shankar, Pentapati, P. R., and Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Biodiesel synthesis from cottonseed oil using homogeneous alkali catalyst and using heterogeneous multi walled carbon nanotubes: Characterization and blending studies”, Egyptian Journal of Petroleum, vol. 26, pp. 125-133, 2017.[Abstract]


The trans-esterification of cottonseed oil using strong alkali catalyst and using multi walled carbon nano tubes as catalyst to produce biodiesel was studied. The interaction effects of various factors such as temperature, amount of alkali used, alcohol to oil ratio and reaction time on yield of biodiesel were studied. The maximum yield of 95% biodiesel was obtained. The biodiesel produced was characterized using FT-IR spectral analysis and GC–MS analysis to ascertain the various functional groups and compounds available in it. The properties of biodiesel using homogeneous alkali catalyst and heterogeneous multi walled carbon nanotubes such as calorific value (36.18 MJ/kg, 33.78 MJ/kg), flash point (160 °C, 156 °C) and other properties such as viscosity, cloud point, pour point and density were found to determine the quality of biodiesel produced. The studies were done by blending the biodiesel produced with diesel and properties of blended samples were estimated to ascertain the use of blended samples in internal combustion engines. © 2016 Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute

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2016

Journal Article

D. Aravind and Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Film pore diffusion modeling and contact time optimization for adsorption of distillery spentwash on fly ash”, Desalination and Water Treatment, pp. 1-9, 2016.[Abstract]


The contact time in two batch adsorbers were optimized using unreacted shrinking core model for the adsorption of biopolymeric pigments in distillery spentwash by fly ash adsorbent. The total optimal contact time obtained was 40 min for 3 m3 adsorbate volume having initial biopolymer concentration of 1.5 mg/dm3. The film pore diffusion model was used to determine the external mass transfer coefficient, effective diffusion coefficient, and bed capacity for continuous adsorption process. The adsorbent bed capacities at different initial biopolymeric concentrations (2,000, 5,500, 8,700, and 12,500 mg/ml) are 69.26, 114.41, 143.64, and 172 mg/g, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficients at various bed heights were determined for continuous adsorption process. © 2016 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

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2015

Journal Article

N. Rajeev, Dr. Krishna Prasad R., and Dr. Udaya Bhaskar Reddy Ragula, “Process Simulation and Modeling of Fluidized Catalytic Cracker Performance in Crude Refinery”, Petroleum Science and Technology, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 110–117, 2015.[Abstract]


The simulation of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) process was performed using Aspen HYSYS. The effect of crude flow rate on naphtha flow, coke yield, and catalyst to oil ratio in FCC were simulated. The interaction effects of riser height, inlet crude flow rate and operating temperature on naphtha mass flow, catalyst to oil ratio, and coke yield were studied by Box-Behnken design. The maximum yield of naphtha (100000 kg/h) was obtained for FCC operating temperature within 520–600°C and riser height greater than 30 m. The catalyst to oil ratio of above 12 was obtained for operating temperature beyond 590°C for the entire riser height variation of 10 to 60 m in FCC. The increase in riser height resulted in increase production of naphtha, but beyond 60 m of riser height secondary cracking occurs resulting in reduction in yield of naphtha.

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2015

Journal Article

S. P Sankar and Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Process Modeling and Particle Flow Simulation of Sand Separation in Cyclone Separator ”, Particulate Science and Technology, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 110-117, 2015.[Abstract]


The simulation of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) process was performed using Aspen HYSYS. The effect of crude flow rate on naphtha flow, coke yield, and catalyst to oil ratio in FCC were simulated. The interaction effects of riser height, inlet crude flow rate and operating temperature on naphtha mass flow, catalyst to oil ratio, and coke yield were studied by Box-Behnken design. The maximum yield of naphtha (100000 kg/h) was obtained for FCC operating temperature within 520-600°C and riser height greater than 30 m. The catalyst to oil ratio of above 12 was obtained for operating temperature beyond 590°C for the entire riser height variation of 10 to 60 m in FCC. The increase in riser height resulted in increase production of naphtha, but beyond 60 m of riser height secondary cracking occurs resulting in reduction in yield of naphtha.

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2015

Journal Article

S. C.S., P.S., S., and Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Grinding kinetics, modeling, and subsieve morphology of ball mill grinding for cement industry ingredients”, Particulate Science and Technology, pp. 1-8, 2015.[Abstract]


The dependence and interactions of various factors affecting the ball mill grinding like diameter of ball, particle size, and time of grinding on 80% passing size of product d80 was studied for cement industry raw materials of lime stone and sand using Box–Behnken design of response surface experiments. The bond grindability index and work index of ball mill were determined for different feed characteristics by varying the number of balls involved in grinding operation in the ball mill. The higher specific rate of breakage was obtained for new or smooth surfaced balls than old or rough surfaced balls. The reduction in size due to ball mill grinding was found to be better for wet grinding than dry grinding based on specific rate of breakages obtained. The subsieve morphology of particles in sieve pan for sand for both dry and wet grinding were analyzed using scanning electron microscopic observations to determine the breakage characteristics. 2016 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

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2014

Journal Article

Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Removal of Biopolymer in Distillery Spentwash using Iridium Oxide Coated Titanium Mesh Anode and Polyaluminum Chloride: Optimization and Sequential Studies”, Environmental Engineering and Management Journal, vol. 13, pp. 29–35, 2014.[Abstract]


The purpose of the undertaken research work is to degrade the biopolymeric pigments present in the distillery spentwash. This is done by direct electro-oxidation using iridium oxide coated titanium mesh as catalytic anode. The effects of current intensity, dilution, pH and time of electro-oxidation were studied. The combined effects were analyzed using Box-Behnken design for optimization and statistical analysis. The rate constant for first order electrochemical kinetics relating the rate constant and current density for decolorization is proposed as kIr = 0.00109 (Id)
1.7244. The power consumption at different current intensities was found based on chemical oxygen demand reduction. The optimal parameters obtained were current intensity (1.3A), dilution (10%) and electrolysis time of 3 hours for 90% target color removal. The actual color removal at optimal conditions is 88% color removal, which confirms close to statistical analysis. The sequential treatment with polyaluminum chloride coagulant was studied to develop an optimized solution for complete degradation of biopolymers.

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2014

Journal Article

P. Ramesh, Dr. Krishna Prasad R., and Baskar, R., “Enzymatic and Chemical Delignification of Kraft Wood Pulp: Optimization & Sequential Studies (Accepted)”, Environmental Engineering and Management Journal, 2014.[Abstract]


The delignification of wood pulp using hydrogen peroxide and Xylanase enzyme in an ultrasonicator was studied at different process conditions. The factors influencing the chemical delignification were studied simultaneously using the Box-Behnken design of experiments. The mathematical model for Kappa reduction as functions of consistency of the pulp, concentration of peroxide and the temperature of delignification was developed. The response optimization studies for minimizing the Kappa number using chemical delignification provides the optimal conditions of 11% consistency of pulp, 3% concentration of peroxide and 50oC temperature with Kappa reduction to 15 as optimum value for the range of variables studied. The sequential delignification using enzyme followed by peroxide treatment was found effective with maximum reduction in Kappa number was achieved.

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2014

Journal Article

Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Impacts of Human Farm Activities on Tropical Deforestation and Climate Change: Interactive Statistical Models (Accepted)”, International Journal of Global Warming, 2014.

2010

Journal Article

Dr. Krishna Prasad R., “Degradation of biopolymeric pigments in distillery spentwash by electrocoagulation using copper anodes: statistical and canonical analysis”, Environmental Chemistry Letters, vol. 8, pp. 149-155, 2010.[Abstract]


The electrocoagulation studies of distillery spentwash using copper anodes were utilized to demonstrate the usefulness of Box–Behnken experimental design of response surface analysis to derive a statistical model and the optimum parameters for color removal. The current intensity (1.5 A), dilution (10%) and time of electrolysis (5 h) had been found to be the optimum conditions for maximum 77.11% color removal. The actual color removal at optimized conditions was found to be 78.26%, which is to the predicted response using response surface methodology. The energy consumption and current efficiency were determined from reduction in chemical oxygen demand. More »»

2008

Journal Article

Dr. Krishna Prasad R., R. Kumar, R., and Srivastava, S. N., “Design of Optimum Response Surface Experiments for Electro-Coagulation of Distillery Spent Wash”, Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, vol. 191, pp. 5-13, 2008.[Abstract]


Electro-coagulation (EC) of a distillery spent wash has been optimized by Box–Behnken design of surface response analysis in terms of color removal. The design was employed to derive a statistical model for the effect of parameters studied on removal of color using iron anodes. The current density (31 mA/cm2), dilution (17.5%) and time of electrolysis (4 hours) had been found to be the optimum conditions for maximum 95% color removal. The actual color removal at optimized conditions was found to be 93.5% which confirms close to the predicted response using response surface methodology. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Conference Publication Type Title

2004

Conference Proceedings

K. S. Rajan, Dr. Krishna Prasad R., Ponnusami, V., Rajamanickam, V., and Srivastava, S. N., “Ilmenite to Synthetic Rutile - Trends in Value Addition”, National Workshop and Seminar on Sustainable Development of Coastal Placer Minerals: Placer-2004. New Delhi , pp. 235-239, 2004.[Abstract]


This paper discuss briefly about the various process related to the conversion of ilmenite to compared. Based on the review of the literature suggestions have been made for certain modifications in the existing processes. Among the existing processes, ERMS seems to be better and modifications may be incorporated to improve Benlelite process for which an improved flow sheet is discussed in the chapter.

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2003

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Krishna Prasad R., Srivastava, S. N., Pitchumani, B., and Rajan, K. S., “Study of Heat Transfer during gas-solid flows”, Indian Society of Mechanical Engineering Conference, ISME – 2003. IIT - Roorkee, 2003.

Courses

CODE SUBJECT
CHE 211 Fluid Mechanics
CHE 241 Materials Science and Strength of Materials
MNG400 Principles of Management
CHE 291 Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
CHE 292 Strength of Materials Laboratory
207
PROGRAMS
OFFERED
6
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
CONSTITUENT
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A
GRADE BY
NAAC, MHRD
8th
RANK(INDIA):
NIRF 2018
150+
INTERNATIONAL
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