Qualification: 
MD, DM
Email: 
rkrishnakumar@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. Krishnakumar R. currently serves as Professor & Head at the Department of Paediatric Cardiology, School of Medicine, Kochi.

QUALIFICATION : MD, DM, FACC, FAHA

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

B. Palafox, Mocumbi, A. Olga, R Krishna Kumar, Ali, S. K. M., Kennedy, E., Haileamlak, A., Watkins, D., Petricca, K., Wyber, R., Timeon, P., and Mwangi, J., “The WHF Roadmap for Reducing CV Morbidity and Mortality Through Prevention and Control of Rheumatic Heart Disease.”, Glob Heart, 2017.[Abstract]


Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a preventable non-communicable condition that disproportionately affects the world's poorest and most vulnerable. The World Heart Federation Roadmap for improved RHD control is a resource designed to help a variety of stakeholders raise the profile of RHD nationally and globally, and provide a framework to guide and support the strengthening of national, regional and global RHD control efforts. The Roadmap identifies the barriers that limit access to and uptake of proven interventions for the prevention and control of RHD. It also highlights a variety of established and promising solutions that may be used to overcome these barriers. As a general guide, the Roadmap is meant to serve as the foundation for the development of tailored plans of action to improve RHD control in specific contexts.

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2017

Journal Article

A. Chanchal Sen, Morrow, D. Forbes, Balachandran, R., Du, X., Gauvreau, K., Jagannath, B. R., R Krishna Kumar, Kupiec, J. Koch, Melgar, M. L., Chau, N. Tran, Potter-Bynoe, G., Tamariz-Cruz, O., and Jenkins, K. J., “Postoperative Infection in Developing World Congenital Heart Surgery Programs: Data From the International Quality Improvement Collaborative.”, Circulation. Cardivascular quality and outcomes, vol. 10, no. 4, 2017.[Abstract]


BACKGROUND:Postoperative infections contribute substantially to morbidity and mortality after congenital heart disease surgery and are often preventable. We sought to identify risk factors for postoperative infection and the impact on outcomes after congenital heart surgery, using data from the International Quality Improvement Collaborative for Congenital Heart Surgery in Developing World Countries. METHODS AND RESULTS: Pediatric cardiac surgical cases performed between 2010 and 2012 at 27 participating sites in 16 developing countries were included. Key variables were audited during site visits. Demographics, preoperative, procedural, surgical complexity, and outcome data were analyzed. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for infection, including bacterial sepsis and surgical site infection, and other clinical outcomes. Standardized infection ratios were computed to track progress over time. Of 14 545 cases, 793 (5.5%) had bacterial sepsis and 306 (2.1%) had surgical site infection. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among cases with infection than among those without infection (16.7% versus 5.3%; P More »»

2017

Journal Article

R Krishna Kumar, “A roadmap for the aspiring interventional pediatric cardiologist.”, Ann Pediatr Cardiol, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 109-113, 2017.

2016

Journal Article

S. Harikrishnan, Sanjay, G., Ashishkumar, M., Menon, J., Rajesh, G., and R Krishna Kumar, “Pulmonary Hypertension Registry of Kerala (PROKERALA) - Rationale, design and methods”, Indian Heart J, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 709-715, 2016.[Abstract]


BACKGROUND: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality. There is paucity of data regarding PH from the developing countries including India. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is the most important etiological factor in the western world, but PH secondary to rheumatic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and untreated congenital heart disease could well be the predominant causes in developing countries like India. The main objective of the PROKERALA study - Pulmonary hypertension Registry Of Kerala is to collect data regarding the etiology, practice patterns and one-year outcomes of patients diagnosed to have PH.

METHODS: The study is a hospital-based registry in the state of Kerala supported and funded by the Cardiological Society of India, Kerala Chapter. A total of 77 hospitals have agreed to participate in the registry. PH was defined as systolic pulmonary artery pressure derived by echocardiography of more than 50mmHg (by tricuspid regurgitation jet) or mean PA pressure more than 25mmHg obtained at cardiac catheterization. A detailed questionnaire is administered which includes the demographic characteristics, risk factors, family history, ECG data, 6 minute walk test distance, chest X ray findings and echocardiographic data. Details of PH specific therapy and one-year follow-up data are collected. From a preliminary survey in the region, we estimated that we will be able to collect 2000 cases over a period of one year.

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2014

Journal Article

D. Lakshmi Narayanan, Yesodharan, D., Dr. Mahesh K., Kuthiroly, S., Thampi, M. V., Hamza, Z., Anilkumar, A., K Nair, M., Sundaram, K. R., R Krishna Kumar, and , “Cardiac spectrum, cytogenetic analysis and thyroid profile of 418 children with Down syndrome from South India: a cross-sectional study”, The Indian Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 81, pp. 547–551, 2014.[Abstract]


Objective To describe the spectrum of congenital heart disease in children with Down syndrome and their cytogenetic profile (and that of parents of those with translocation), and thyroid profile. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in 418 consecutive patients with Down syndrome attending the Department of Pediatric Genetics from a tertiary care centre in Kerala with a comprehensive Pediatric Cardiac Program, from November 2005 through April 2012. All children were offered cytogenetic analysis and were subjected to echocardiography. Parental karyotyping was offered for children with translocation type of Down syndrome. The thyroid profiles of all children were checked at the first visit and once every 6 mo during follow up. Results Congenital heart disease was present in 256 (63.4 %) of 404 children with Down syndrome. Ventricular septal defect (72; 28.1 %) was the commonest, followed by atrio-ventricular septal defect (70; 27.3 %) and patent ductus arteriosus (43; 16.8 %). Surgical correction was accomplished in 104 (40.6 %) with excellent intermediate-term outcomes. Three hundred eighty seven of 418 children (92.6 %) underwent cytogenetic tests. The abnormalities included non-disjunction (340, 87.8 %), translocation (33, 8.5 %) and mosaicism (12, 3.1 %). Hypothyroidism was detected in 57 children (13.6 %). More »»

2014

Journal Article

S. Singh, Jose, T., Versporten, A., Sengupta, S., Fini, P., Sharland, M., R Krishna Kumar, and Goossens, H., “A point prevalence surveillance study from pediatric and neonatal specialty hospitals in India”, Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, vol. 9, pp. 151–155, 2014.[Abstract]


Point prevalence surveys (PPS) have been used to document antimicrobial use in healthcare organizations. Antimicrobial resistance is a global concern, more so for developing countries like India, where the burden of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases are very high. A web based PPS developed by University of Antwerp, Belgium for the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children (ARPEC) project was used to enter data from pediatric and neonatal wards and intensive care units (ICU) from 8 centers across India. All patients who were receiving systemic antibacterial treatments on the day of the survey inclusive of antibacterial prophylaxis for surgery were included. 195 patients were surveyed across India: 105 (54%) medical and 90 (46%) surgical. 192 (98%) patients received multiple antimicrobials out of which 187 (95%) were given parenterally. Empirical antimicrobials were prescribed in 138 (71%) patients and targeted therapy in 57 (29%). The commonest infections for which antimicrobials were prescribed were healthcare associated infections 180 (41.76%) followed by surgical prophylaxis 90 (21%) and community acquired infections 84 (18%). Antimicrobials usage was maximal in ICUs. More than a single dose (5.6%) for more than a day (86.7%) was used for surgical prophylaxis. The Web based PPS suggests widespread antibiotic usage among pediatric and neonatal patients in selected tertiary Indian hospitals and underscores the need for antibiotic stewardship in order to promote rational and evidence based practice to limit the emergence of antibiotic resistant microbes. More »»

2014

Journal Article

S. Sunder Kothari and R Krishna Kumar, “Professor Rajendra Tandon: Passing of a legend”, Annals of pediatric cardiology, vol. 7, p. 83, 2014.[Abstract]


Dr. Rajendra Tandon, father figure of pediatric cardiology in India, passed away on 26th of February 2014, after a brief illness. He represented the fountainhead for the pediatric cardiologists of India, and directly and indirectly influenced much for the growth of the disciplines in the field of adult and pediatric cardiology in India [Figure 1]. Dr Tandon was born on 21st January 1931. He had his early medical training at the famous King George Medical College, Lucknow in early fifties. Subsequently, he was trained at the Boston Children hospital under Dr. Alexander Nadas during the nascent years of the discipline of pediatric cardiology. He chose to return to India despite the easy feasibility of staying overseas then, [Figure 2] because of his commitment to his country. He joined the budding cardiology department of All India Institute of Medical Sciences in 1963; guided and nurtured generations of students in the practice of cardiology who then went on to head the cardiology departments throughout the country. He superannuated as chief of the cardiothoracic center at the All India institute of Medical Sciences in 1991. His legacy now extends to more than 2 generations of cardiologists and includes numerous luminaries in India and abroad. Although he often lamented that he could train only 6 students to take up his primary vocation of pediatric cardiology, this had more to do with the way cardiology care was organized in India rather than the reflection of his influence: For his influence went even beyond cardiology and pediatric cardiology, but touched the very core of his student's being. More »»

207
PROGRAMS
OFFERED
5
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
CONSTITUENT
SCHOOLS
A
GRADE BY
NAAC, MHRD
9th
RANK(INDIA):
NIRF 2017
150+
INTERNATIONAL
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