Qualification: 
MS, MCh, DNB
Email: 
krishnakumart@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. Krishnakumar T. currently serves as Associate Professor at the Department of Head & Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, Kochi.

Qualification : MS (ENT), DNB (Otorhinolarygology), MCh (Head and Neck Surgical Oncology), Fellow - American Head and Neck Society

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

S. T. Joseph, Dr. Krishnakumar T., and Iyer, S., “Reconstruction of a Combined Maxillectomy and Segmental Mandibulectomy Defect in a Seven-Year-Old with a Single Free Fibula Osteocutaneous Flap.”, Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 73-76, 2017.[Abstract]


Combined upper alveolectomy and segmental mandibulectomy are complex defects. Reconstruction of these defects is usually suboptimal. We describe the case of a pediatric patient with vessel-depleted neck with recurrent vascular malformation involving the ramus and coronoid process of mandible and a previous history of maxillectomy and a reconstruction with anterolateral thigh flap. The patient underwent wide resection. The defects involving the upper alveolus and mandible were simultaneously reconstructed with a single free fibula flap.

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2016

Journal Article

D. Khadakban, Kudpaje, A., Dr. Krishnakumar T., Jayaprasad, K., Gorasia, T., Vidhyadharan, S., Mathew, J., Sharma, M., and Iyer, S., “Reconstructive Indications of Anterolateral Thigh Free Flaps in Head and Neck Reconstruction.”, Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 40-5, 2016.[Abstract]


<p>Anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap is a common flap with multitude of indications. The purpose of this article is to review the reconstructive indications of the flap in head and neck defects. This is a retrospective study of 194 consecutive ALT flaps. Data including patient characteristics (age, sex, comorbidities), disease characteristics (histology, T stage), and flap characteristics (size of the flap, type of closure of ALT donor site) were collected. The outcome in terms of flap success rate, surgical, and donor site morbidity were studied. A total of 194 flaps were performed in 193 patients over a period of 10 years. Mean age of the patients was 55 years (range 16-80 years). Out of the 193 patients, 91 (47.1%) patients had oromandibular defects, 52 (26.9%) had tongue defects, 15 (7.7%) had pharyngeal defects, 17 (8.8%) had skull base defects, 4 (2%) had scalp defects, and 14 (7.2%) had contour defects of the neck. The overall flap success rate was 95.8% (8 total flap loss out of 194). Hypertrophic scar was the commonest donor site problem seen in 20 (10.3%) patients. This study shows the versatility of free ALT flap in head and neck reconstruction. It is a reliable and safe. Donor site morbidity is minimal.</p>

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2016

Journal Article

S. Bhattacharya, Vidhyadharan, S., Dr. Krishnakumar T., and Dr. Subramania Iyer K., “Cross-Cheek Dumbbell-Shaped Radial Forearm Flap for Simultaneous Correction of Oral Cancer and Submucous Fibrosis”, Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 162-5, 2016.[Abstract]


Simultaneous occurrence of oral submucous fibrosis along with carcinoma of the buccal mucosa is common. We report a novel technique of a single dumbbell-shaped, cross-cheek radial forearm free flap to repair bilateral defects caused by oral cancer resection on one side and the release of fibrosis on the other side in two patients. The dumbbell-shaped flap provided tissue for both the buccal mucosa defects and central released soft palate preventing fibrosis and reapproximation. The interincisor distance improved in both the patients.

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2014

Journal Article

S. Vidhyadharan, Augustine, I., Kudpaje, A. S., Dr. Subramania Iyer K., and Dr. Krishnakumar T., “Site-wise Differences in Adequacy of the Surgical resection Margins in Head and Neck Cancers”, Indian journal of surgical oncology, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 227–231, 2014.[Abstract]


Adequacy of surgical resection decided by the margin status is important in attaining a good local control and better survival in Head and neck Cancers. Conventionally, a measured distance between the tumor edge and the cut edge of the specimen is taken as the margin. A margin more than 5 millimeter (mm) is considered clear, less than 5 mm is close and less than one mm is denoted as involved. The concept of this adequacy varies between the different sites and subsites in head and neck. The purpose of this paper is to review the current evidence that describes the adequacy of surgical margin status and their variability among the sites and sub-sites in the head and neck. More »»

2012

Journal Article

A. Sadasivan, Dr. Krishnakumar T., Rajapurkar, M., Shetty, S., Sreehari, S., Iyer, S., and , “Verrucous lesions of the oral cavity treated with surgery: Analysis of clinico-pathologic features and outcome”, Contemporary clinical dentistry, vol. 3, p. 60, 2012.[Abstract]


Verrucous lesions of the oral cavity can be of varied histopathology. The present study evaluates the clinico-pathological features of verrucous lesions of the oral cavity and analyzes the treatment outcomes. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 15 consecutive patients who presented with verrucous lesions of the oral cavity, during the 5-year period from January 2006 to December 2010. Demographic, clinico-pathological features, treatment details, and outcomes were analyzed. Results: Fifteen patients with verrucous lesions of the oral cavity were treated with surgery as the primary modality. The mean age was 62.8 years (range 35-85 years). Wide excision of the primary lesion with adequate mucosal and soft-tissue margins was carried out. Free-flap reconstruction was done in eight patients. All patients remain loco-regionally controlled with good functional speech and swallowing outcome. Conclusions: Verrucous lesions of the oral cavity are a distinct clinical entity with varied histopathology. A surgical excision with wide margins and appropriate reconstruction is necessary to optimize the disease and functional outcome More »»

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