Qualification: 
Ph.D, M. Pharm., B. Pham.
kaladhar22654@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan joined as Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutics, Amrita School of Pharmacy in September 2015. He has 12 years research experience. He has last served as Fellow Scientist –D at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, India and is currently consulting for various organizations nationally and internationally.

He has more than three years of post doctoral research experience in USA from one of premier research groups in immunotherapeutics and drug delivery, Mc Gowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine; Department of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering & Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, USA as well as he was a visiting scholar to Phillipps University, Marburg in Germany for 2 years.

He has completed Ph. D. in Biomedical Engineering (Biosurface Modification), Biomedical Technology Division, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology. He has also done his M. Pharm. at Annamali University, Tamil Nadu and Bachelor of Pharmacy at Dr. MGR University, Tamil Nadu.

He has developed products filed several national and international patents, bagged several awards and has several research articles, book chapters and conference proceedings. He also actively participate in various professional society activities.

Education and Work Experience

  • Assistant Professor (From Sept 2015 continuing) at Amrita School of Pharmacy, Cochin, Kerala, India:
    Responsibilities:
    • Teaching: M Pharm 1st sem; CDDS- 3credits theory & 2credits practical (2015-2016 as per Amrita syllabus (1 sessional exam)), DDS- 5credits theory and 2credits practical (MPH102T) & Regulatory Affairs- 2credits (MPH104T), (2017 onwards as per PCI syllabus 2 sessional exam); M Pharm 2nd Sem (ADDS-3credits) (2015-2016), Molecular Pharmaceutics (NanoTech and Targeted DDS)- 5credits theory and 2credits practical (2017 onwards as per PCI syllabus),
    • Outreach: Professional awareness to schools, research orientation programs for B Pharm 5th and 6th sem.
    • Research: Guiding M Pharm student thesis-6, completed-4, pending-2, areas: Pharmaceutics, biomaterials, bio surface technology, pharmacology, diagnostics, diabetes, prostate cancer, bone regeneration and eye diseases), B Pharm thesis guidance-2 (Completed-1, Running-1), PhD student guiding-0, Research collaborations -5; institutional-1, intra-university-2, inter-university-0, international-1.
    • Consulting: Pilot plant development, Cell culture facility development, Research lab development, Industry: Strategic consulting in technology development for companies,
    • Societies: Strategic planning, Organising speeches, Reviewing for international conferences,
    • Thrust Area Groups (TAGs): Diabetes, Autoimmune disease, Bioavailability,
    • Consulting for clinical- podeology, endocrinology, cancer, Projects for extramural grants focus: Diabetes, Wound Healing, Bone regeneration,
    • Administration: Board of studies committee, Anti-ragging committee, Research committee and IIIPC committee,
    • Output: Highlights: Govt. policy document: 1 national document published,
    • Products: Two products developed, Publications: Highest impact factor reached 8,
    • Awards: 4Nos in a year,
    • Peer-reviewed publications: (Original research work (5)
    • Reviews: (2) (Journal/Impact factor/No, JCR(7.8)(1), Col.Interf.sci B-Biointerf (4.2)(1),
    • Book Chapters: 1 (Elsevier),
    • Opinion paper- 1,
    • Extramural grants -4 (submitted)(2017- onwards),
    • Seed grants-1 (running),
    • Invited talks-3,
    • Research manuscripts- 5 (published),
    • Patents (Indian)- 3 (Submitted to office-1, Under preparation-2),
    • Conference papers -4 (invited talk-1, posters 4),
    • Special issue edited: 1 on going, +Books: 1 on going,
    • Product developed: 2,
    • Technology briefing document-5,
    • Organizing session in conference-1 (2017-2018)
    • Workshops-1.
  • Fellow Scientist-D (2012-2015 successfully completed – 3yrs) at FADDS, BST Division, BMT Wing, SCTIMST PoojappuraThiruvananthapuram, India, 695012, in prestigious Chitra High-Value Fellowship (Adhoc contract appointment against permanent vacancy),
    • Responsibilities:
      • Developing short term research programs in immunomodulation/therapeutics and nanobiotechnology,
      • Facility for advanced drug delivery systems (FADDS) second phase, Bio surface technology division in new research programs,
      • Key author contributions in TIFAC 2035 vision document on Biomaterials,
      • Commercially exploitable technologies evidenced in terms of technology briefing documents,
      • Patent submissions,
      • Publications.
      • International Research Programs (H2020),
      • International Visits to University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
  • Postdoc in Immunomodulation and therapeutics as well as in the area of Nanobiotechnology, Depts. of Chemical Engineering, bioengineering, immunology, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA, Advisor: Dr. Steven R Little, (Associate Professor) (2009 to 2012) (3-4yrs).
  • Pre-postdoc Training in Immunology: Project-based personal exchange program, DST-DAAD, Phillips University, Marburg, Germany, Advisor: Prof. Med. Harold Renz, (Director, BMFZ). (2006-08) (successfully completed visiting collaborative research for 2yrs, 3months each for two times).
  • Ph.D. in biomedical Engineering (Bio surface modification) Bio surface technology division, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Science and Technology, (An institute of national importance) Poojappura- Thiruvananthapuram, India, 695012, Mentor: Prof. Chandra Prakash Sharma (2003- 08).
  • Junior Research Fellow in Oral delivery of insulin (nanotechnology for oral cavity delivery), NMITLI project, Biosurface technology division, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Science and Technology, (An institute of national importance) Poojappura- Thiruvananthapuram, India, 695012, (2001-2003) (2yrs).
  • Master of Pharmacy (Industrial Pharmacy) (equivalent to pharmaceutics), at Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, INDIA., Advisors: Subbal C Basak (Professor), and T. Subburaj (Vice President, Micro labs Ltd) (1998-00).
  • Bachelor of Pharmacy at Dr. MGR Medical University, Tamil Nadu, INDIA (1993-97).

Research Areas 

Fundamental research areas: Material science, Supramolecules, Biophysics, Cellular dynamics and Immunology. With a background in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology. Applied research in Drug delivery systems, Nanotechnology/Nanomedicine, Immunotherapeutics/Immunomodulation, Surface modification strategies, Tissue engineering and Regenerative medicine related to Periodontology (dental medicine), Neurology, Cardiology, Wound healing, Haemorhage, Eye disease.

National Vision Roadmap for Biomaterials

  • Kaladhar K, Sharma CP, Biomaterials vision document for TIFAC Vision-2035 roadmap on materials published in 2016.

Product Developed/Consulted 

  • Multi-drug containing paediatric syrup (2018), SKAN Research Labs Pvt Ltd, Puducherry, India, (Optimised the formulation and solved the incompatibility issues) (Product in market).
  • Multi drug-containing eye lotion (2018), SKAN Research Labs Pvt Ltd, Puducherry, India, Optimised the formulation and rectified the stability issues) (Product in the market).
  • Microdox DR Capsules USP, by Micro Labs Ltd, Bangalore, India (2001), Developed the formulation and scaled up. (Product in the market)

Fellowships, Awards and Honors 

  • One of the ambassadors from India for 11th World Biomaterial Congress, Glasgow, Scotland, (2019).
  • Organising Committee member International Conference on Advances in Polymeric Materials and Human Healthcare, 16-18 October 2019, International center Goa India, Organised by Asian Polymer Association and STERMI, Goa, India, (2019).
  • Best poster award, Current trends in drug development and delivery technology, Chiral, nano and herbal technology, Nehru College of Pharmacy, Thrissur, Kerala, India, (2019).
  • Best poster award, Prime Pharma-conclave 2019 Prime college of pharmacy, Palakkad, Kerala, India, (2019).
  • Organising committe member of BioTerm 2019, IIT Kanpur, India, (2019).
  • Best poster award, International conference in clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical technology, JAMIA College of Pharmacy, Kerala, India, (2019).
  • Best poster award (Springer-nature), Biomet-2018, International conference on biomaterials, bioengineering and biotheranostics, VIT, Vellore, TN, India, (2019)
  • Coordinator, Research Industry Network (RIN) session at BioMet 2018, VIT, Vellore, India, (2019).
  • National Advisory Board member of BioMet 2018, VIT, Vellore, India,(2019).
  • National Advisory Board member of Asian Biomaterial Congress-6, 2017, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (2019).
  • Author honoured, Biomaterials roadmap- Vision 2035, TIFAC, DST, India, Kolkotta, 2016.
  • Chitra High-Value Fellowship (2012-2015)
  • Postdoctoral fellowship (2009-2012)
  • Executive board member of Society for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine India (STERMI) (2008-2010).
  • DST-DAAD Project-Based Personal Exchange Program, Indo-German collaborative project (2006- 2008).
  • Senior Research Fellowship (SRF) of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), India (2006-08).
  • Best Poster Presentation Award, 19th MRSI-AGM, 19th AGM, Kerala, India (2008).
  • Travel Grant from CSIR to attend Regenerate & Society for Biomaterials conferences at Pittsburgh, USA (2006).
  • Best Oral Presentation Award in MACRO -2004, Society for Polymer Science, India (2004).
  • General Aptitude Test for Engineering (GATE)(1998).

Collaborations 

  • Current: (2018-2020): Continuing all from last year with the inclusion of Megasis Biotek Ltd, Eranakulam, Kerala, Inda and entered an MOU with them on academic and research consultancy, (2017-2018) Institutional: (1) Nair SV Dean (Research) Sabitha M (Principal), Manita B Nair, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, India., International (1) Tyagarajan B, Padmamalini T, University of Wyoming, Wyoming, USA., Industrial (1) R Narasimman, director, SKN Organics Pvt Ltd. (1) Dr. Praveen K, Amrita Hospital,
  • Past collaborations: Industrial (1) T Subburaj (Vice President) (Microlabs Ltd, Bangalore, 2000-2001), (2) Research (India): Chandra Prakash Sharma (Associate Head), SCTIMST, (2001 to present), (USA) Steven R Little (Chairman and Head) (2010-Present), AC Balazs (Chairman and Head), Bhaskar Goduku, Susheng Tan, Alexander Star, Riccardo Gottardi, Sam Rothenstein, Yanan Chen, Smitha Mathews, Siddharth Jhunjunwala, University of Pittsburgh, (2010 to present).

Students Guided

  • B Pharm (Thesis)
    • Student Details
      • Graduated: (2016-2017) (Published) Juna Joju (M Pharm, Amrita School of Pharmacy), Megha Hansen (M Pharm, Amrita School of Pharmacy), Alex Antony (studies abroad), Current: (2017-2018)(Published) Thomas Kuruvila (Symbiosis, MHA), Aiswari S Kumar (Joined for M Pharm, Amrita School of Pharmacy), Kavya SG (Joined for M Pharm, Amrita School of Pharmacy), Rasheed A(Joined for M Pharm, Amrita School of Pharmacy).
    • Thesis Details
      • (1) Juna J, Megha H, Alex A, (2017) Advanced bandages to stop haemorrhage from the lower limb extremities, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K).
      • (2) Thomas K, Aiswari SK, Kavya SG, Abdul R, (2018) Early detection and therapy of epilepsy using point of care systems, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K).
  • M. Pharm. (Thesis)
    • Graduated:
      • 2013-2014 (Published) Anupriya Mahesh (IF4.2) (Lecturer, Amrita School of Pharmacy, Kochi),
      • 2015- 2016 Jayakrishnapillai PV (IF4.2) (Aster, Dubai), Aravindsiva (IF7.7) (QC, Strides Arco lab, Bangalore),
      • 2016-2017 Rashmi Radhakrishnan (Scopus) (QA, Wockard Pharmaceuticals), Athira J Nair (Scopus) (Sun Pharma, Production, Hydrabad),
      • 2017-2018 Delma Decruz (Teaching, Vinayaka college pf pharmacy, Madurai, Tamilnadu, India), Jeevna (SKN, Madridge, FR&D, Bangalore), Juna Joju (Joined for pHD), Megha Hanssan (Joined for PhD).
    • Jayakrishnapillai PV, (2016) Insulin depots for therapeutic applications in diabetes mellitus, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K) (IF 4.3).
    • Aravindsiva, Nanoemulsion for the treatment fo prostate cancer, (Co-guide: Kaladhar K, Guide: Sabitha M) (IF 7.8)
    • Rashmi R, Controlled local delivery of insulin for accelerated wound healing, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
    • Athira J Nair, Developing a controlled insulin drug delivery system for bone regeneration applications, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K).
    • Delma Decruz, Kajal based occular insert (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
    • Jeevna R, aspirin nanomedicine to extend the golden hour in stroke (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
    • Megha H Occular insert to deliver insulin (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
    • Juna J, Controlled delivery of antibiotic to wound bed (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
    • Aiswari S, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
    • Shefrin, (Guide Dr. Kaladhar K)
  • Ph. D. (Thesis)
    • (2018-2019)
      • Juna Konikkara (Guide: Kaladhar K) ( currently enrolling)
      • Megha Hanssan (Guide: Kaladhar K) ( currently enrolling)
    • (2017-2018)
      • Renju Radhakrishnan (Guide: Kaladhar K) ( currently enrolling)

Grants

List of Projects Implemented/Written as a PI

  • 2019
    • Kaladhar K (PI) Self-assembling nanoparticulate insulin depots for delivering unaltered long-acting basal insulins by minimally invasive pen injections and microneedle technology (Submitted to DBT) (94.03Lakhs)
    • Kaladhar K (PI) Biomimetic nanoparticle-based antibiotic drug delivery for accelerated wound healing of surgical full-thickness chronic wounds, (Submitted to ICMR) (1.07Cr)
    • Kaladhar K (PI) Basal insulin delivery through nasal cavity using combustion derived carbon particle (CDCP) based biomimetic nanoparticles for treating diabetes mellitus (1.06Cr).
  • 2017
    • Kaladhar K (PI), Sabitha M, Biocompatible self-associating nanoparticulate insulin depot for reducing the number of injections per week to half in diabetic patients: structure-property-function study in diabetic rat model., DST nanomission project, (48.25Lakhs), (2017-2020) (Submitted to funding agency, DST-nanomission).
  • Before 2015
    • Kaladhar K (PI), RN Menon, VS Harikrishnan.,(2012) Supported and programmed CNS miniatures with a regenerative capacity to treat severe Spinal Cord Injury(SCI): Nanomedicine for glial scar therapeutics, OHF Project SCTIMST, (2.6Lakhs), 2013-2016, (implemented and report submitted).
    • Kaladhar K (PI), Renju R (Student), Peptide building blocks for nano-biomaterials in wound healing applications Seed grant, 30,000Rs, 2017-2018,(Grant approved), Amrita Viswa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala, India.

List of Projects Written as a Student/Tenured Track Faculty

  • Kaladhar K, Sharma CP, (2006) Center for advanced drug delivery systems (CADDS), DST, (42Crores) Asked to resubmit as subprojects.
  • Kaladhar K, Sharma CP, (2007) Facility for advanced drug delivery systems (FADDS), DST, (5Crores) (2008-2012).
  • Kaladhar K, Sharma CP, (2006), Evaluation of Pro and anti Th1/Th2 inflammatory profile of cells onto bio-material surface by studying the cytokine release profile, DST-DAAD project-based personal exchange program, (2006-2008).
  • Kaladhar K, CSIR Fellowship, (2006-2008).
  • Little SR, Balazs AC, NSF project (2010-2012).
  • Kaladhar K, Sharma CP (SCTIMST) and nine other international institutes, (2014), TB Vaccine, Horizon 2020.

Invited Talks

  • Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, (2016), (Author Briefing), Biomaterials chapter, 2035 Technology Vision, Technology Roadmap on materials, TIFAC, DST, India, IN national seminar on technology thrust on materials and manufacturing sector in India, CSIRCGCRI, Kolkutta, July 28-29 (Org by: CGCRI, IIM Kolkata, MIEEM, TIFAC).
  • Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, (2016), (Invited Talk), Zero dimensional Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes and its application in super thin electronics and nanomedicine, BiTERM- 2016, InternationalConferrence on Biomaterials,Biodiagnostics,  Tissue Engineering, Drug Delivery and Regenerative Medicine, IIT Delhi, New Delhi, India, April 15-17, (Org by: Center for Biomedical Engineering, IIT Delhi,SBAOI, STERMI).
  • Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, (2016) (Invited Speaker), The nanobridge in drug discovery and therapeutics: Nanomedicine, Advancing chemotherapy with a merge of medicinal chemistry and bioinformatics, Karpagam University, Karpagam College, June 17, (Org by: Karpagam University, AICTE).
  • Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, (2016) (Invited Speaker), Traditional medicine to link with modern medicine:Research Possibilities, Medical Seminar, Kozhikode, Sept 17, (Org by: HKS, Kozhikode).

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2020

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Drug Delivery in New Decade of 2020 Onwards: Considerations for Designing Diffusion Based Drug Delivery Devices”, Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 73-74, 2020.[Abstract]


Drug delivery devices are gaining interest particularly in the long term management of chronic dseases. This perspective gives insight into major considerations that need to be given while developing diffusion-based drug delivery devices particularly with respect to biodegradable nanosystems

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2020

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Zero-dimensional nanotubes as nano-devices to dismantle COVID-19: Possibilities of advanced coatings, "nano-instant vaccines" and "prophynostics"”, Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs, vol. 34(S2), pp. 38-43, 2020.

2020

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Biomimetic conjoining pathways for COVID-19 drug discovery, nanomedicine and medical devices: Prophylactic medicines as alternative for vaccines”, Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 73-74, 2020.[Abstract]


COVID-19 pandemic is now beyond control and needs easily translatable therapeutic solutions. Here, the possibilities of developing prophylactic antiviral formulations that can be interfaced with medical devices are discussed exploring novel molecular pathways and biomimetic engineering approaches.

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2020

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and S, S., “Controlled drug delivery for alopecia: A review”, Journal of Controlled Release, vol. 325, pp. 84-99, 2020.[Abstract]


Alopecia or hair loss is a benign treatable disorder which, over time, becomes chronic, affecting a significant fraction of the population that affects the patient’s self-esteem and quality of life. The existing treatment regimen for alopecia is inadequate for drug delivery directly to hair follicles to result in continuous hair growth. The challenges are due to multiple-dose regimes and patient non-adherence, where it requires motivated clinical attention. Developing a prolonged drug delivery system by exploration of specific pathways to advance the delivery system into nanomedicine would be beneficial for clinical advancement. In this review, factors affecting the progress of the current therapeutic regimen towards controlled release nanomedicine (CRNM’s) are analysed for existing clinical unmet needs, current treatment strategy, and research efforts taken in this direction. Correspondingly, changes in anatomy and pathophysiology of hair growth being analyzed in detail to focus the exact scenario of hair growth cycle and supplementation of medication. Besides, the current treatment regimen with various classes of drugs, their different pathways, and dosing limitations are analyzed. Possibilities of research effort for prolonged drug delivery are discussed in detail, including marketed products, clinical trials as well as various patents filed in the direction. Repurposing of multiple therapeutics using the nanotechnology platform, subsequently, results in a strategy to develop nanomedicine to treat alopecia, which could develop into several technologies (CRNM’s), fore coming years from now.

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2019

V. K.V., Hansan, M., Madhu, K., Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, and Renju Radhakrishnan, “Formulation of different polymer coated spherules from granules”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 1633-1637, 2019.[Abstract]


A novel spheronisation technique is reported here for forming spherules from granules using FDA approved excipients and common pharmaceutical unit operations. The aspirin is used as a model drug to check stability during the process. For that, spherules are prepared by "bed coating during sliding" (BCDS) of granules. Spherules with two size range (sieve no 22 and 44) are compared. These spherules are further coated with polymers to show the versatility of the process. They are characterised by microscopical evaluation, flow property determination, drug content evaluation and in vitro drug release studies. Microscopical evaluation reveal that number of edges (90° and 45°) are less for spherules compared to granules. Angle of Repose sand packing parameters appeared excellent. Different polymer coating gives different release profile as per the properties of the polymer. However, the drug content is lower for 44 as compared to 22 while drug release profile appears similar. This is a robust and versatile platform delivery system for developing advanced drug delivery systems (ADDS). However, the stability of aspirin is affected by the wet process may be because aspirin is a hydrolytically labile drug.

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2019

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, R., J., and Dr. Sabitha M., “Novel aspirin controlled release nanomedicine suppresses platelet aggregation: implications for extending the golden hour in stroke (Under review)”, Pharmaceutical Research, 2019.

2019

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and D., D., “Prophylaxis using estradiol nano-medicine based occular insert suppresses allergic conjunctivitis in rat model: A “tradition-mimetic” approach (Under Review)”, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 2019.

2019

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and B., B., “Infection control in lower limb ulcers for wound healing current status and future perspectives (Under review)”, International journal of nanomedicine, 2019.

2019

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and T., T., “Tuberculosis control current status and future prospectives for developing nanomedicine strategies (Under review)”, Journal of Controlled Resease, 2019.

2018

J. Rajeev, Mukundan, S., Raj, K. S. Bimal, Dhanaja, V. P., Subburaj, T., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Formulation of a novel immediate release heterolithic buccal patch of aspirin”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 2079-2083, 2018.[Abstract]


The aim of this work is to prepare an immediate release heterolithic buccal patch of aspirin. Solvent casting method has been used to formulate the fast dissolving buccal patch using FDA approved materials. The use of various excipients for providing optimum patch properties, such as heterolithic nature, super disintegration leading to dissolution of the patch has been analyzed. The problems related to hygroscopicity, disintegration time and residence time have been optimized by varying the excipients. The drug content analysis has been carried out and the patch with 50% sodium starch glycolate (SSG) as a super-disintegrant and 80% lactose as solubility enhancer has shown maximum release of the entire drug content within first 5 min as compared to the one with 30% SSG and 80% lactose. Based on the physicochemical characteristics such as appearance, flexibility, drug content and disintegration, FDAP3 and FDAP4 have been selected for further studies. The in vitro studies were carried out and from the drug release profiles, FDAP4 has been considered as the best formulation. From this study, it is apparent that optimum concentration of SSG along with other ingredients are required to produce the required immediate release of sparingly soluble drug like aspirin from buccal patch. © 2018, Pharmainfo Publications. All rights reserved.

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2018

D. D’cruz, Ajith, A., Subburaj, T., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Magnesium stearate is an incompatible excipient for aspirin in wet granulation producing non-linear degradation”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research (JPSR) , vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 240-242, 2018.[Abstract]


Excipients are materials added along with therapeutic agents; and incompatibility between excipients and therapeutic agents affect the final outcome of the product. Aspirin is an ester and is prone to hydrolysis. This study focus on the effect of magnesium stearate as an excipient on stability of aspirin in granules. For that an accelerated degradation study was done on aspirin-magnesium stearate containing granules. For that, aspirin containing granules were sequentially mixed with increasing concentration of magnesium stearate to develop different test samples and they are type 1 (T1), type 2 (T2), type 3 (T3) and type 4 (T4) granules and heated at 70°c for 2 hours and evaluated the drug content. The drug content of untreated samples was found to be 168mg estimated by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The assay of different granules were for T1- 77.11%, T2- 96.7%, T3- 58.02% and T4- 53.80% respectively. The results show that, in these granules prepared by wet granulation process, the aspirin is degrading in a non-linear manner as the drug content increases and followed by decreasing. Overall, the study shows that magnesium stearate is an incompatible excipient for aspirin, varying in a non-linear manner, in granules as a lubricant.

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2017

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “"FABLE” First aids (FAs) for Blood Loss in Emergency-Campaign for Rural India Exploring Pharmacists”, Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs , vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 33-40, 2017.[Abstract]


Advanced healthcare technologies that are available in urban cities are scanty in rural country side. To reduce the healthcare disparity, indigenous efforts are required; for its R&D as well as to improve the supply chain. This review proposes, a campaign named “FAs for Blood Loss in Emergency (FABLE)” for rural India. Through this campaign new advanced first aids (FAs) and point of care systems (POCs) needed to be developed using advanced biomaterials. Another requirement is that, the rational use of these technologies needs to be ensured in rural India. Pharmacists are effectively participating in public health in rural side, can significantly contribute towards the R&D and rational use of these medical technologies. FABLE campaign is to motivate academia to network with other stake holders to develop project based academic programs for early introduction of students to technology development to make these technologies affordable and accessible. This can help bigger national campaigns such as Make in India and Vision 2035 successful in terms of serving the global needs.

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2017

J. Konikkara, Antony, A., Renju Radhakrishnan, Hanssen, M., Nair, A. J., Radhakrishnan, R., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Affordable Technologies to Stop Bleeding from Haemorrhage: New Role of Pharmacists in its R&D and Rational use in Rural India”, International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 194-200, 2017.[Abstract]


This review focuses on developing biomedical first-aid (FA) technologies and its affordable rational use for the pre-hospital control of bleeding in external haemorrhage from limb extremities after traumatic injury. Public academic research hand in hand with government policies such as “Make-in-India” campaign could be explored for it. Pharmacists have unique skill set due to technological and clinical training in therapeutics. Subsequently, they can be given advanced training for the R&D and rational use of these haemostatic FAs for emergency care; particularly in rural areas of developing world. This may improve the accessibility and affordability of the medical technologies in the developing world.

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2017

A. Sasikumar and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Nanomedicine for prostate cancer using nanoemulsion: A review.”, Journal of Controlled Release, vol. 260, pp. 111-123, 2017.[Abstract]


Prostate cancer (PCa) is a worldwide issue, with burgeoning rise in prevalence, morbidity and mortality. Targeted drug delivery, a long sort solution in this regard using controlled release (CR) - nanocarriers, is still a challenge. There is an emerging criticism that, the challenges are due to less appreciation for the biological barriers and lack of corresponding newer technologies. Over the years, more understanding about the biological barriers has come with the progress in characterization techniques. Correspondingly, there is a change in opinion about approaches in clinical trial that; focus of the end point need to be shifted towards disease stabilization for these explorative technologies. Currently, there is a requirement to overcome these newly identified challenges to develop newer affordable therapeutics. The ongoing clinical protocol for therapy using CR-nanocarriers is intravenous injection followed by local targeting to cancer site. This is the most accepted protocol and new CR-nanocarriers are being developed to suit this protocol. In this review, recent progress in treatment of PCa using CR-nanocarriers is analyzed with respect to newly identified biological barriers and design challenges. Possibilities of exploring nanoemulsion (NE) platform for targeted drug delivery to PCa are examined. Repurposing of drugs and combination therapy using NE platform targeted to PCa can be explored for design and development of affordable nanomedicine. In 20yrs. from now there expected to be numerous affordable nanomedicine technologies available in market exploring these lines.

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2017

A. S. Kumar, Kuruvila, T., Kavya, S. G., Radhakrishnan, R., Nair, A. J., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Early detection of seizures in epilepsy using point of care (POC) systems”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 302-306, 2017.[Abstract]


In epileptic patients recurrence of seizure is a concern and its prognosis is important. Getting seizure freedom is necessary for the patients to maintain a normal risk free life. Even though, the pharmacological treatment provides 60-70% reduction in seizures over prolonged treatment, the concerns of recurrence remains. In this review we are analysing the common psychological and physiological complications associated with epilepsy. Also analysing the use of point of care (POC) systems for seizure prognosis. In addition, the future possibilities for developing indigenous affordable and accessible technologies for seizure prognosis are analysed. © 2017, Pharmainfo Publications. All rights reserved.

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2017

J. PV, Shantikumar V Nair, and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Current trend in drug delivery considerations for subcutaneous insulin depots to treat diabetes”, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, vol. 153, pp. 123-131, 2017.[Abstract]


Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder due to irregularities in glucose metabolism, as a result of insulin disregulation. Chronic DM (Type 1) is treated by daily insulin injections by subcutaneous route. Daily injections cause serious patient non-compliance and medication non-adherence. Insulin Depots (ID) are parenteral formulations designed to release the insulin over a specified period of time, to control the plasma blood glucose level for intended duration. Physiologically, pancreas produces and secretes insulin in basal and pulsatile mode into the blood. Delivery systems mimicking basal release profiles are known as open-loop systems and current marketed products are open-loop systems. Future trend in open-loop systems is to reduce the number of injections per week by enhancing duration of action, by modifying the depot properties. The next generation technologies are closed-loop systems that mimic the pulsatile mode of delivery by pancreas. In closed-loop systems insulin will be released in response to plasma glucose. This review focuses on future trend in open-loop systems; by understanding (a) the secretion of insulin from pancreas, (b) the insulin regulation normal and in DM, (c) insulin depots and (d) the recent progress in open-loop depot technology particularly with respect to nanosystems. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

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2016

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Affordable Medicines Exploring Organ Printing using “Make in India” Campaign”, Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 161–162, 2016.[Abstract]


One of the main social needs at present in the country is affordable healthcare. This is already identified by the government, and included pharmaceuticals as a strategic sector in “Make in India” campaign. In this opinion paper, a strategy is proposed for need based innovation of new affordable pharmaceuticals using organ printing technology. The countries current capabilities and positive attitude is conducive for this endeavour.

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2015

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Renz, H., and Sharma, C. P., “Nano-anisotropic surface coating based on drug immobilized pendant polymer to suppress macrophage adhesion response.”, Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces, vol. 128, pp. 8-16, 2015.[Abstract]


Exploring drug molecules for material design, to harness concepts of nano-anisotropy and ligand-receptor interactions, are rather elusive. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the bottom-up design of a single-step and bio-interactive polymeric surface coating, based on drug based pendant polymer. This can be applied on to polystyrene (PS) substrates, to suppress macrophage adhesion and spreading. The drug molecule is used in this coating for two purposes. The first one is drug as a "pendant" group, to produce nano-anisotropic properties that can enable adhesion of the coatings to the substrate. The second purpose is to use the drug as a "ligand", to produce ligand-receptor interaction, between the bound ligand and receptors of albumin, to develop a self-albumin coat over the surface, by the preferential binding of albumin in biological environment, to reduce macrophage adhesion. Our in silico studies show that, diclofenac (DIC) is an ideal drug based "ligand" for albumin. This can also act as a "pendant" group with planar aryl groups. The combination of these two factors can help to harness, both nano-anisotropic properties and biological functions to the polymeric coating. Further, the drug, diclofenac (DIC) is immobilized to the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), to develop the pendant polymer (PVA-DIC). The interaction of bound DIC with the albumin is a ligand-receptor based interaction, as per the studies by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and SDS-PAGE. The non-polar π-π* interactions are regulating; the interactions between PVA bound DIC-DIC interactions, leading to "nano-anisotropic condensation" to form distinct "nano-anisotropic segments" inside the polymeric coating. This is evident from, the thermo-responsiveness and uniform size of nanoparticles, as well as regular roughness in the surface coating, with similar properties as that of nanoparticles. In addition, the hydrophobic DIC-polystyrene (PS) interactions, between the PVA-DIC coating and PS-substrate produce improved coating stability. Subsequently, the PVA-DIC coated substrate has the maximum capacity to suppress the macrophage (RAW 264.7 cell line) adhesion and spreading, which is partly due to wavy-surface topography of hydrophilic PVA and preferential albumin binding capacity of PVA bound DIC. Our result shows that, such surfaces suppress the macrophages, even under stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The modified tissue culture plates can be used as an in vitro tool, to study the macrophage response under low spatial cues.

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2014

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Anupriya,, Deepa, M. K., and Sharma, C. P., “Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.”, Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces, vol. 122, pp. 301-308, 2014.[Abstract]


A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release properties in the combined formulations. Our proof concept study shows that, the conversion of curcumin to a metal-organic supramolecular prodrug improved the solubility, stability and release profile of curcumin. The prodrug approach with the micellisation strategy appears to be more appropriate to deliver intact curcumin in the presence of ceramic particles of varying surface reactivity.

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2014

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Anisotropic Surface Coatings Controls Drug Delivery From Reservoir Devices Similar to That of Erodible Systems.”, Trends in Biomaterials & Artificial Organs, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 176-181, 2014.[Abstract]


Anisotropy in biological lipid membranes can be observed in terms of phase separation of lipids into co-existing laterally condensed and fluid regions and this composition depended process regulates membrane mechanical properties. The aim of this work is to explore the lipid membranes with anisotropic properties to control drug delivery from reservoir devices. We have earlier demonstrated that, using phosphatidylethanolamine the size of the cholesterol rich domains in model mixed lipid membranes can be reduced to the size of order of trans-membrane proteins. In this work, we have checked whether, these model membranes have the capacity to control the drug release in a concentration independent manner from reservoir devices. Our results show that, anisotropic lipid coatings definitely suppress the burst release to less than 10% and produce concentration independent release profile to the extent of erodible systems and produce prolonged controlled delivery for upto 60 days. However, change in size of the domains to one order lower magnitude does not significantly alter the release profile at earlier time points.

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2014

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Anupriya,, Deepa, M. K., and Sharma, C. P., “Supramolecular curcumin–barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles”, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, vol. 122, pp. 301 - 308, 2014.[Abstract]


Abstract A simple and stable curcumin–ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba2+) to prepare curcumin–barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba2+ by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1]+ peak at 10,000–20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The 1H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba2+ interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba2+ to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba2+ complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba2+ as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release properties in the combined formulations. Our proof concept study shows that, the conversion of curcumin to a metal-organic supramolecular prodrug improved the solubility, stability and release profile of curcumin. The prodrug approach with the micellisation strategy appears to be more appropriate to deliver intact curcumin in the presence of ceramic particles of varying surface reactivity.

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2014

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Renz, H., and Sharma, C. P., “Cell-mimetic coatings for immune spheres”, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, vol. 123, pp. 845–851, 2014.[Abstract]


Extrinsically induced or engineered cells are providing new therapeutic means in emerging fields such as cell therapeutics, immunomodulation and regenerative medicine. We are demonstrating a spatial induction method using lipid coatings, which can change signal presentation strength from material surface to adherent macrophage cells, that induce early cell–cell interaction leading to organotypic morphology. For that, we have developed a cell mimetic lipid coating with a rafts size to the order of transmembrane proteins (<10 nm) with enhanced lateral elastic properties. Such surface coatings are capable of reducing adherent macrophage spreading, while enabling early induction of cell–cell interaction to form organotypic macrophage colonies or “spheres” (M-spheres).

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2013

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Gottardi, R., Tan, S., Chen, Y., Godugu, B., Rothstein, S., Balazs, A. C., Star, A., and Little, S. R., ““Zero-Dimensional” Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes”, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, vol. 52, no. 43, pp. 11308–11312, 2013.[Abstract]


The shorter, the more dispersible: An iterative, emulsion-based shortening technique has been used to reduce the length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the same order of magnitude as their diameter (ca. 1 nm), thus achieving an effectively “zero-dimensional” structure with improved dispersibility and, after hydroxylation, long-term water solubility. Finally, zero-dimensional SWNTs were positively identified using mass spectrometry for the first time.

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2011

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Jhunjhunwala, S., Wu, J., Swanson, A., Gao, D., and Little, S. R., “Patchy, Anisotropic Microspheres with Soft Protein Islets”, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, vol. 50, no. 37, pp. 8706–8708, 2011.[Abstract]


Useful contacts: A new method to achieve regular patterns generates anisotropic, “patchy” microspheres by using interfacial condensation of a liquid mask and the proximity of the particles to their neighbors to determine a mask pattern. The microspheres are separated from the scaffold and labeled with a first protein at non-mask regions (green) followed by removal of the mask and immobilization of a second protein (red).

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2009

C. Durgadas, Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Divya, P., Sreenivasan, K., and Sharma, C., “Preliminary studies on blood compatibility and Langmuir monolayer stability of gold nanoparticles stabilized through amino-PEG functionality”, Trends Biomater. Artif. Organs, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 86-92, 2009.[Abstract]


Here we report the blood compatibility and Langmuir monolayer stability at air water interface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) synthesized using o,o’ bis (2 amino propyl) poly ethylene glycol (M. Wt. 1900) (DAPEG) as capping agent by a one pot synthetic approach. PEGylated GNPs were synthesized with varying concentration of DAPEG using Sodium Borohydride (SBH) as a reducing agent, at room temperature. The NPs were characterized by HRTEM, Dynamic Light Scattering and UV/ Vis absorption spectroscopy. The blood compatibility of the nanoparticles in activating the blood components was investigated by haemolysis assay and platelet activation studies. Our preliminary results show that modified gold nanoparticles are more blood compatible and stabilize the lipid monolayer reflecting the possibility of tuning new hybrid materials. © Society for Biomaterials and Artificial Organs (India), 20090103-34.

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2007

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Surface passivation and controlled ligand supplementation of cellular activation processes–strategies for bottom up synthesis of bioactive surfaces”, Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 29–62, 2007.[Abstract]


This review emphasize on the underlying principles governing blood and tissue compatibility of biomaterials and various surface modification techniques. This could also be explored for development of functionally active nanobiomaterials. Here the role of chemical and physical stimuli, when ligands are present in the soluble or bound form in activating the biological system is extensively reviewed. Apart from that the current advances in surface modification strategies by bottom up method, or post synthetic surface modification at submicron to nano levels is discussed. Such improved surface modification strategies may have applications in drug delivery and other biomedical systems.

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2006

S. C. Basak, Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, and Subburaj, T., “Studies in Formulation of Delayed Release Capsules of Doxycycline Hyclate”, ACTA Pharmaceutica Sciencia, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 121- 128, 2006.[Abstract]


The objective of the study was to prepare delayed release doxycycline hyclate capsules with suitable blend of doxycycline hyclate-coated pellets (DC pellets) and delayed release pellets (DR pellets). Formulation was optimized on the basis of in vitro drug release. DC pellets were prepared to optimize the amount of polyvinyl pyrrolidone and the optimum concentration was found to be 5%. Two batches of DC pellets showed desired release in buffer medium. DR pellets formulation was optimized using polymer and other variables. The blend of DC pellets (75%) and DR pellets (25%) in capsules produced an optimum drug release in acid and buffer media

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2006

S. Mathews, Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, and Sharma, C. P., “Cell mimetic monolayer supported chitosan-haemocompatibility studies”, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 147–152, 2006.[Abstract]


Chitosan is a natural polymer, widely explored for biomedical and tissue engineering applications. However the thrombogenic nature limits their application in blood contacting devices and implants. Here, we have attempted to understand the haemocompatibility of chitosan by immobilizing a monolayer of cell mimetic lipid compositions. The phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol/galactocerebroside lipid composition (PC/Chol/GalC, 1:0.35:0.125) was deposited onto the chitosan films. Characterization of the modified surface was done by sessile drop contact angle measurement. The contact angle of the chitosan film reduced from 80.65 ± 1.4 to 23.5 ± 1.9 after the surface modification. Swelling nature of chitosan seemed to influence the orientation and packing of the lipid monolayer. In vitro calcification studies with metastable salt solution indicated increased calcification on the modified surface. This may be due to formation of nuclei for calcification on the expanding monolayer. The preliminary haemocompatibility studies with washed platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes showed overall reduction in blood cell adhesion to the modified surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy was used for morphological characterization of platelet adhesion and activation on the surfaces. On the bare chitosan surface, fully spread platelets with extending pseudopodia indicated platelet activation. The smooth surface of the modified film did not activate platelets. These studies showed that, though the lipid monolayer on chitosan film is able to reduce the over all blood cell adhesion and platelet activation it is prone to calcification. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2006

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2006

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Cell mimetic lateral stabilization of outer cell mimetic bilayer on polymer surfaces by peptide bonding and their blood compatibility”, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 23–35, 2006.[Abstract]


The biological lipid bilayer membranes are stabilized laterally with the help of integral proteins. We have simulated this with an optimized ternary phospholipid/glycolipid/cholesterol system, and stabilized laterally on functionalized poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) surfaces, using albumin, heparin, and polyethylene glycol as anchors. We have earlier demonstrated the differences due to orientation and packing of the ternary phospholipid monolayers in relation to blood compatibility (29). The structure of albumin is changed here to expose its interior hydrophobic core by treating with organic solvent. The interaction between the hydrophobic core of the albumin molecule and the hydrophobic core of the lipid molecules is confirmed by incorporating the molecule into bilayer membranes. The secondary structure of the membrane incorporated albumin is studied by CD spectral analysis. The structure of the altered albumin molecule contains more β‐sheet as compared to the native albumin. This conformation is also retained in membranes. The partitioning of the different anchors based on its polarity and ionic interactions in the monolayer is studied from the pressure‐area (π‐A) isotherm of the lipid monolayers at the air/water interface using Langmuir‐Blodgett (LB) trough facility. Such two monolayers are deposited onto the functionalized PMMA surface using LB trough and crosslinked by carbodiimide chemistry. The structure of the deposited bilayer is studied by depth analysis using contact mode AFM in dry conditions. The stabilized bilayer shows stability up to 1 month by contact angle studies. Preliminary blood compatibility studies reveal that the calcification, protein adsorption, as well as blood‐cell adhesion is significantly reduced after the surface modification. The reduced adsorption of ions, proteins, and cells to the modified surfaces may be due to the fluidity of the microenvironment along with the contribution of the mobile PEG groups at the surface and the phosphorylcholine groups of the phospholipids. The stability of the anchored bilayer under low shear stress conditions promises that the laterally stabilized supported bilayer system can be used for low shear applications like small diameter vascular graft and modification of biosensors, and so forth. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2006

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2004

S. C. Basak, Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, and Subburaj, T., “Doxycycline hyclate delayed release capsules with sodium starch glycolate as a pH-dependent pore forming agent”, Indian journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 66, no. 5, pp. 704–707, 2004.[Abstract]


Delayed release doxycycline hyclate capsules were prepared with suitable blend of doxycycline hyclate-coated nonpareil seed pellets and doxycycline hyclate delayed release pellets. The delayed release pellets were prepared by coating the doxycycline hyclate-coated pellets with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose phthalate-55 polymer solution. A concentration of polymer in the range of 15 to 20% was found to comply with drug release test as specified in the USP in acid medium but failed to meet the requirements in buffer medium (pH 5.5). The inclusion of sodium starch glycolate (1-3%) in both doxycycline-coated and delayed release pellets preparation stages was found to enhance the release of the drug in the buffer medium without altering its release in acid medium. The blend of delayed release pellets (75%) and drug-coated pellets (25%) in delayed release doxycycline hyclate capsules produced an optimum in vitro drug release in both the media.

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Publication Type: Presentation

Year of Publication Title

2019

H. Megha, Juna, K., Alex, A., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Nanomedicine delivery from advanced tourniquet to stop hemorrhage from the lower limb extremities”, Current Trends in Drug Development and Delivery Technology, Chiral, Nano and Herbal Technology (Best Poster Award). Nehru College of Pharmacy, Thrissur, Kerala, India, 2019.

2019

H. Megha, Juna, K., Alex, A., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Nanomedicine to deliver antiplatelet agent from advanced tourniquet to suppress haematoma”, International Conference on Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology (Best Poster Award). Jamia Salafiya Pharmacy College, Malappuram, Kerala, 2019.

2019

K. Juna, Megha, H., Alex, A., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Nanomedicine for delivery of anti platelet agent from advanced tourniquet”, Prime Pharma-Conclave 2019 (Best Poster Award). Prime College of Pharmacy, Palakkad, Kerala, India, 2019.

2018

D. Dcruz and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Development of medicated kajal based drug delivery system for the prophylaxis of allergic conjunctivitis”, Biomet-2018, International Conference on Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Biotheranostics (Best Poster Award). VIT, Vellore, TN, India., 2018.

2018

K. Juna, Alex, A., Megha, H., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Advanced bandages to stop hemorrhage from lower limb extremities”, International Conference on Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Biotheranostics (Best Poster Award- Sponsored by Springer - Nature). VIT, Vellore, TN, India, 2018.

2017

J. N. Athira and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Controlled growth factor delivery for bone regeneration”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster) . Kochi, Kerala, India., 2017.

2017

R. Rashmi and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Accelerated wound healing using nanosystems”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster). Kochi, Kerala, India., 2017.

2017

S. K. Aiswari, Kavya, S. G., Thomas, K., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Early detection of epileptic siezures”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster). Kochi, Kerala, India., 2017.

2017

S. G. Kavya, Aiswari, S. K., Thomas, K., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Pharmaceutical strategies for addressing cigarette smoking”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster). Kochi, Kerala, India, 2017.

2017

D. Delma and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Pharmacological strategies to address cataract”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster). Kochi, Kerala, India., 2017.

2017

K. Thomas, Rehna, M., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Treatment strategies for tuberculosis resistaince”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster). Kochi, Kerala, India., 2017.

2017

K. Juna, Alex, A., Megha, H., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Advanced bandages to stop haemorrhage from the lower limb extremities”, Research Day, Amrita School of Pharmacy (Poster). Kochi, Kerala, India, 2017.

2017

A. J. Nair, Decruz, D., MB, N., SV, N., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Accelerated Bone Regeneration in Critical Calvarial Defect By Controlled Delivery of Insulin from Scaffold”, 6th Asian Biomaterial Congress (Poster). Thiruvananthapuram, India., 2017.

2017

R. Rashmi, Renju, R., Nair, S. V., and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Controlled local delivery of insulin for accelerated wound healing”, 6th Asian Biomaterial Congress (Poster). Thiruvananthapuram, India, 2017.

2015

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, T B, S. Benjamin, and Sharma, C. P., “Research-Industrial Networks (RIN)- Need of the hour in India”, BITE-RM-2015, Indo-Australian Conf. on Biomaterials, Tissue Engg, Drug Delivery Systems, and Regenerative Medicine. 25th Annual Meeting of Society for Biomaterials and Artificial Organs India, 8th Annual Meeting of Society for Tissue Engg & Regenerative (Oral Presentation), 2015.

2011

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Little, S. R., “Synthetic Cells with Ordered Protein Patches”, Annual Meeting & Exposition (Poster). Orlando, Florida., 2011.

2010

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Little, S. R., “Self-assembly of quantum single walled carbon nanotubes”, 10th AIChE Annual Meeting. Salt Lake City, USA., 2010.[Abstract]


Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) are seamless single-layered rolled up graphene sheets (between 0.5 to 5m in length and 1-2≤nm in diameter) generally existing as bundles. SWNTs have unique physical (e.g. opto-electronic, transport, and self-assembling) properties. However, these properties are obscured due to bundling of the tubes. Studies have revealed that the said physical properties are easier to observe when nanotubes are shortened and dispersed in solvents1. In this talk, we will describe the self-assembly of SWNTs with lengths less than 100nm (Quantum SWNTs), which is produced by a unique technique developed in our lab. The self-assembly process was studied by varying solvent parameters, temperature and ionic concentration with respect to time and pH. Evaluation via UV-VIS, UV-VIS-NIR, Raman, AFM, TEM and HRTEM reveal that both side wall integrity and the length regulate the self- assembly process in various solvents. Long tubes take part in swift lateral self-assembly, decreasing proportionately with the length of the tubes. Acknowledgement NSF (0941260) CBI and NFCF, University of Pittsburgh, for the imaging facility. Reference (1) Price KB., Lomeda JR., Tour JM., Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 3917392

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2010

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Little, S. R., “Anisotropic Protein Patterned Microspheres”, 10th AIChE Annual Meeting. Salt Lake City, USA., 2010.[Abstract]


Mimicking the surface anisotropy of natural systems (e.g. atoms, molecules, proteins and immune cells) by patterning proteins or polymers as interactive patches on synthetic substrates is an attractive strategy to achieve unique functional efficiency in applications such as sensors, biomedicine and photonics1. Further, microspheres are an attractive substrate because their shape and size allows them to interact with similarly sized units like biological cells. Yet a method for facile surface patterning of the microspheres is not yet available. Ideally, this technique would include mild conditions during processing while still permitting fine control over size and order of patterns. Recently, we have developed a new dewetting induced lithography technique to accomplish this task on a microsphere surface. We utilize a new self-assembly process to control the orientation of polystyrene (PS) microspheres (as a model particle). Subsequently, we use a scaffold-based protection/deprotection and labeling procedure that produces polymer or protein patterns reproducibly under mild conditions. SEM-EDAX studies indicate that the pattern of PDMS patch formation on the surface is robust. CLSM studies reveal regular and ordered dual protein pattern. We are currently exploring several applications for our dual-labeled particles including drug delivery, immunotherapeutics, catalysis, and photonic applications. Acknowledgement Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation for funding. References (1) Zhang Z, Glotzer, SC, Self-Assembly of Patchy Particles., Nano Letters, 2004, Vol. 4, No. 8, 1407-1413

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2008

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Incorporation of Globular Proteins into Lipid Monolayers after Conformational Change”, 8th World Biomaterials Congress (Poster). Amsterdam, Netherlands., 2008.

2008

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Bottom Up Synthesis Of Protein Like Nanoparticles With Enhanced Drug Loading And Their Post Synthetic Surface Modification”, 8th World Biomaterials Congress (Oral). Amsterdam, Netherlands., 2008.

2008

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Biofriction at Cell Mimetic Lipid Surfaces: Microspheres”, 8th World Biomaterials Congress (Poster). Amsterdam, Netherlands., 2008.

2008

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Biofriction at Lipid Modified Surfaces: Polymeric Gels”, 8th World Biomaterials Congress (Poster). Amsterdam, Netherlands., 2008.

2008

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Deb, D., and Sharma, C. P., “Preliminary investigation on formation of embryoid bodies on cell mimetic surfaces and controlled ligand supplementation”, 8th World Biomaterials Congress (Poster). Amsterdam, Netherlands., 2008.

2008

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Role of head group structure in regulating the packing density of lipid monolayers on phosphatidylcholines, and development of liposome delivering matrices for nerve conduit applications”, 19th Annual meeting of the Materials Research Society of India (Poster) (Best Poster Award) . Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India., 2008.

2007

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Calcification at micro domains: A bottom up approach for the synthesis of bioactive ceramic nanoparticles with high drug loading”, CMA 2007, Indo-US workshop on Ceramics for Medical Applications (Poster). IIT Madras, Chennai, TN, India., 2007.

2007

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Development of thin solid films of thermoresponsive nanoparticles and their characterization”, BITE & RM (Poster). Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India., 2007.

2007

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, V., A. Rani, and Sharma, C. P., “Screening of ligands for blood compatible applications by In silico methods: NSAID’s like Aspirin, Indomethacin & Diclofenac affinity for albumin”, BITE & RM (Poster). Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India., 2007.

2007

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Thermo responsive protein like nanoparticles”, Society for Biomaterials, 31st Annual Meeting: A Multi Dimensional: Multi Disciplinary Approach to Biomaterials (Poster). Illinois, Chicago, USA., 2007.

2007

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Calcification at micro domains: Effect of insulin and ethanol”, Society for Biomaterials, 31st Annual meeting: A Multi Dimensional: Multi Disciplinary Approach to Biomaterials (Poster). Illinois, Chicago, USA., 2007.

2006

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Effect of phosphatidylethanolamine in fibroblast cell adhesion and proliferation”, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society., Regenerate- World Congress on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (Poster) (Travel Award). Westin Convention Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 2006.

2006

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Novel Albumin Self-Assembled Liposomes for Drug Delivery Applications”, Society for Biomaterials, Annual meeting: Biomaterials - The Enabling Technology (Poster) (Travel Award). Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA., 2006.

2005

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Niomat- A Novel Solid Drug Delivery System to Deliver the Niosomes or Proniosomes with Drugs”, Indo- Australian Conference on Biomaterials, Implantable Devices, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (BITE & RM) (Poster). Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India, 2005.

2005

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “A novel Solid Liposome Based Drug Delivery System - Concept Proving Approach”, Society for Biomaterials, 30th Anniversary meeting &Exposition, New Applications and Technologies (Poster). Memphis Cook Convention center, Memphis, USA., 2005.

2004

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Modification of chitosan using n-aryl anthranilic acid derivative for insulin delivery”, Macro2004, International Conference on Polymers for Advanced Technologies, SPSI Annual General Body Meeting (Oral) (Best Oral Presentation). Thiruvananthapuram, India, 2004.

2004

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Modification of chitosan using N- aryl anthranilic acid derivative for blood compatible applications”, International Symposium on Advanced Materials and Processing (Oral) (Travel Award). IIT Kharagpur, India, 2004.

2004

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Blood Compatibility of Cell Mimetic Monolayers”, 7th World Biomaterial Conference (Oral). Sydney, Australia., 2004.

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Title

2018

R. Jeevna and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Development of aspirin loaded niosome”, Biomet-2018, International Conference on Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Biotheranostics. VIT, Vellore, TN, India., 2018.

2018

M. Krishnapriya and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Floating drug delivery sytems using diclofenac sodium as a model drug”, Biomet- 2018, International Conference on Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Biotheranostics. VIT, Vellore, TN, India, 2018.

2012

M. H. Lash, Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Mccarthy, J., and Little, S. R., “Fabrication of Highly Ordered and Close Packed Colloidal Crystals From Large Microparticles”, 12th AICHE Annual meeting. Pittsburgh, PA, USA., 2012.

2002

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Insulin Drug Delivery by Sublingual Route”, MACRO 2002, International Seminar on Frontiers of Polymer Science and Engineering. IIT, Kharagpur, India., 2002.

Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Title

2018

R. Radhakrishnan and Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, “Pharmaceutical perspectives of selection criteria and toxicity profiling of nanotheranostic agents”, in Drug Delivery Nanosystems for Biomedical Applications, Elsevier, 2018, pp. 45–74.[Abstract]


Nanotheranostic agents are nanoparticles for the site-specific delivery of drugs and diagnostic agents. The versatility is that it enables less invasive, local, and concurrent diagnosis cum treatment. It paves the pathway for personalized medicine. Personalized medicine is the next trendsetter in modern medicine. Although considerable progress has been made in proving the efficacy of these systems at preclinical level, safety concerns remain. The widely explored nanoconstructs for nanotheranostics are systems based on polymer conjugates, metallic nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), dendrimers, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In this work, pharmaceutical perspectives for improving theranostic design from safety perspectives are discussed. The conceptual questions addressed in this review are: (1) Which properties of the nanoparticles are relevant for nanotheranostic design from the safety perspective? (2) How the intrinsic and extrinsic factors affect the properties of the nanoparticles in the long run? (3) What is important from safety perspective for developing need-based selection criteria for the design and development of the nanotheranostics? (4) What are the importance of developing new toxicological screening methods specific to nanomaterials along with the current market and clinical perspectives. The review and discussions lead to the requirement of specialization in this area for clinical translation.

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2011

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Manipulation of biomaterial interface by biomimetic strategies: Possibilities of exploring stem cells”, in Stem Cell Technologies: Basics and Applications, Edited by Satish Totey, Kaushik D. Deb, McGrawHill, 2011, pp. 200-214.

2009

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Supported Cell Mimetic Monolayers and their Blood Compatibility”, in Advanced Biomaterials: Fundamentals, Processing, and Applications, Edited by Bikramjit Basu Dhirendra S. Katti Ashok Kumar , Wiley Online Library, 2009, pp. 663–676.[Abstract]


This chapter contains sections titled:
Overview
Dense Thin Solid Films
Biomimetic Approaches in Surface Modification
Calcification Studies
Protein Interaction Studies
Blood Cell Adhesion Studies
Platelet Adhesion and Activation Studies
Conclusions
Acknowledgments
References

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2009

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Possibilities of Using Cord Blood for Improving the Biocompatibility of Implants”, in Frontiers of Cord Blood Science, P. Stubblefield and Bhattacharya, N., Eds. London: Springer London, 2009, pp. 319–330.[Abstract]


Cord blood is a rich source of stem cells, growth factors and immune suppressing cytokines. We have reviewed its potential for enhancing material integration in the case of implants. We have reviewed the problems with the current degenerative therapy, future outlook and also the potential of using cord blood to mimic the biological way of, delivery of active molecules, immune suppression and tissue regeneration.

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Publication Type: Patent

Year of Publication Title

2017

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Nair, S. V., “Globular protein derivative based reconstituted nanoparticle suspension for the controlled delivery of insulin in injections (Under Submission)”, 2017.

2014

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Sublingual delivery of insulin”, 2014.

2013

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Surface coatings for phenotype regulation of adherent cells”, U.S. Patent Indian Patent Appl. No. 160/CHE/20142013.

2012

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Radhika, R., Kumar, S. S. Pradeep, Maya, A. N., and Sharma, C. P., “Drug oligomer based nanoparticles with fast degrading properties”, U.S. Patent Indian Patent Appl. No. 106/CHE/20132012.

2012

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Jayalakshmi, A. C., Kumar, S. S. Pradeep, Vijayan, S., Varma, H. K., and Sharma, C. P., “Ceramic particles with fast and tunable degradation properties for antibacterial applications”, U.S. Patent Indian Patent Appl. No. 608/CHE/20132012.

2012

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan, Menon, R. N., Shenoy, S. J., Nair, R. R., and Sharma, C. P., “Catheter assisted therapeutic delivery device”, U.S. Patent Indian Patent Appl. No. 2138/CHE/20132012.

2012

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and Sharma, C. P., “Novel amphiphilic nano-particle based thermoresponsive coatings on surfaces for tissue engineering applications”, U.S. Patent Indian Patent Appl. No.: 17/CHE/20122012.

2009

Dr. Kaladhar Kamalasanan and R. Steven, L., “Methods to prepare patchy microparticles”, U.S. Patent PCT/US2010/0517712009.[Abstract]


A method for making microparticles having an exterior surface that includes preparing a self-assembled arrangement of microparticles; contacting the self- assembled microparticles with a patch-forming agent resulting in a microparticle/patch-forming agent assembly having proximal regions between adjacent microparticles and/or proximal regions between a microparticle and another substrate, wherein the patch-forming agent is present in the proximal region; and condensing the patch- forming agent such that a pattern of a plurality of discrete patches of patch-forming agent are formed on the exterior surfaces of the microparticles at the proximal regions. A synthetic microsphere having an exterior spherical surface, wherein the exterior spherical surface comprises a first material and a plurality of discrete, uniformly-dimensioned, patches of a second bioactive material arranged in an orderly array over more than one hemisphere of the microsphere.

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