Computational Neuroscience & Neurophysiology

Amrita Center for Computational Neuroscience has been instituted to comprehend the brain and its neural circuits by devising mathematical models. In contrast to other fields in biology, mathematical thinking and methodology have become entrenched in neuroscience since its very beginning, as witnessed by the classical work of Hodgkin and Huxley. Indeed, important developments in mathematics, and particularly in statistics (for example, point processes theory), have their roots in this field. One of the biggest open challenges mathematicians and engineers face, is understanding the complex computation that takes place in our brain.

Amrita School of Biotechnology Installed A New Supercomputer Built on NVIDIA GPUs

Amrita School of Biotechnology has setup a High-Performance Computer (HPC) system based on the latest models of NVIDIA Corp’s Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and started its operation. The facility allows intensive computations on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs).

This project aims at understanding cognitive functioning of cerebellar input layer and implement signal processing abilities into neural hardware using cerebellar architecture. The main goals include understanding cerebellum granule neuron’s role in signal propagation and information processing in a central neuronal network. The other major focus will be on the analysis of cerebellar microcircuits for designing electronic neural processors.

This project proposes to develop a cerebellum inspired pattern recognition algorithm for robotic data classification. The project aims to investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics in the cerebellar network models capable of predicting cerebellar input-output transformations by analyzing the mathematical and computational properties of the network. Both labs have been working together since 2004 on cerebellar models.

In contrast to other fields in biology, mathematical thinking and methodology have become entrenched in neuroscience since its very beginning, as witnessed by the classical work of Hodgkin and Huxley. One of the biggest open challenges mathematicians and engineers face is to understand the complex computation that takes place in our brain. Among the most interesting parts of the brain, is the ‘little brain’, otherwise known as the cerebellum.

Pages