Qualification: 
Ph.D, M.Tech, BE
c_prakash@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Prakash Chinnaiyan currently serves as Assistant Professor (Sr. Gr.) at the Department of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore. 

Education

  • 2020: Ph. D. in Environmental Engineering
    Dept of Civil Engineering, NIT Calicut, India.
  • 2004-2006: M.Tech in Environmental Engineering and Management
    IIT Kanpur, India.
  • 2000-2004: B. E. in Civil Engineering
    PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore.
     

Experience

YEAR AFFILIATION
2014 – Present Assistant Professor (Sr. Gr.),Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore
2010 – 2014 Assistant Professor (Or. Gr.), Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore
2009 – 2010 Project Manager, Repco Infrastructure Ltd., Chennai
2008 – 2009 Design Engineer, Camp Dresser and McKee (CDM), Chennai Office
2006 – 2008 Manager, Reliance Industries Ltd. (NMSEZ Office), Navi Mumbai

Technical Skill Asset

  • Research – Proficient in handling analytical instruments like HPLC-UV/PDA, GC-ECD/MS, HPTLC, AAS,TOC
  • Teaching – Subjects handled – Environmental Engineering, Geo technical and Foundation, Geology, Environmental science, Estimation and Quantity surveying, Design and Drawing and other UG labs
  • Software 
    • Environmental  EPANET, Watergems, ARCGIS
    • Road Design – MXRoad
    • Structural – STAAD

Projects and Consultancies

  • Research Project: 
    • Treatment of Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) using Advanced Oxidation Process (Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, 2018)
    • Characterization and bioremediation of pesticide contamination in soil (IIT Kanpur, 2005)
  • Consultancies:
    • Design and implementation of  water and wastewater lines for the SEZ projects (2009)
    • Live in lab projects (2014)
    • Preparation of feasibility report for setting up of 100 TPD capacity construction and demolition waste in Coimbatore city municipal corporation limit (2017).
    • Design of sustainable infrastructure, Design of commercial building (2018)

Awards / Achievements / Recognition

  • Receiver of Design forum award and  Gold Medalist at PSG College of Technology (2004)
  • Receiver of Academic Excellence award  at IIT Kanpur  (2006)
  • Best Performance award – Design division at NMSEZ, Mumbai ( 2009)

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2019

Prakash Chinnaiyan and Thampi, S. G., “Photocatalytic Treatment of Amiodarone and Levetiracetam in Pharmaceutical Industry Effluent: Process Optimization using Response Surface Methodology”, Desalination and Water Treatment , vol. 170, pp. 253–264, 2019.[Abstract]


In this work, the treatment of synthetic pharmaceutical industry effluent containing two critical pharmaceutical contaminants, viz. amiodarone (AMD) and levetiracetam (LEV) was investigated employing heterogeneous photocatalytic system. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to model and optimize the process variables. Photoreactor (500 mL), immersion lamp emitting ultraviolet rays at 365 nm (125 W) and TiO2 as photocatalyst, was employed and four variables, viz. initial concentrations of AMD and LEV, pH, photocatalyst concentration and reaction time, were considered in this study. The influence of the chosen variables on the removal of contaminants was evaluated using RSM. Regression analysis revealed that removal of both AMD and LEV was influenced by all the four variables. It was found that the maximum removal of AMD was 67.6% and LEV was 92.7% under the optimum conditions. Characteristics experiments indicate that the removal by •OH was the major mechanism in the degradation process. Lesser adsorption of AMD and LEV on the surface of TiO2 and the insignificant removal of these contaminants when acetonitrile was the solvent suggested that heterogeneous photocatalytic effect plays a significant role in the removal process. More than 50% mineralization indicates that the heterogeneous photocatalytic system was capable of oxidizing the synthetic pharmaceutical industrial effluent containing AMD and LEV and could be effectively used to pre-treat the pharmaceutical effluent.

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2019

Prakash Chinnaiyan and S. G.Thampi, “Use of TiO2 for Removing Emerging Contaminant in Water – Amoxicillin as a Case Study”, IOP IOP Conference Series: , vol. 561, pp. 318 – 323, 2019.[Abstract]


In the recent years, evidence of pharmaceutical contaminant in water having deteriorating effects on various species is well documented. The concentration of these pollutants range from ng/L in surface water to mg/L in pharmaceutical industry effluent. Treatment of highly concentrated pharmaceutical industrial effluent is a feasible option when compared to the treatment of dilute surface water. In this work, treatment of pharmaceutical industry effluent containing critical pharmaceutical contaminants (PC) Amoxcillin employing a photocatalytic system was investigated. Chosen factors include concentrations of contaminants (50 – 100 mg/L), TiO2 dosage (500 – 1000 mg/L) and reaction time (10-30 min). MINITAB software was employed to perform the standard regression analysis and the corresponding second-order polynomial equation was constructed between the chosen response (contaminant removal) and the three factors. Results indicate that studied emerging contaminant removal depends on the dosage of photocatalyst and the time employed in the reactor

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2019

Prakash Chinnaiyan and Thampi, S. G., “Optimisation of System Parameters for the Removal of Metformin in a Photocatalytic Reactor Employing TiO2”, IOP Materials Science and Engineering, vol. 561, no. 1, pp. 313 – 317, 2019.[Abstract]


There is strong evidence that presence of emerging contaminants in environment including pharmaceutical compounds at very dilute concentration have deteriorating effects on various species. In general the concentration of these pollutants detected in environment ranges between ng/L to μg/L, but their concentration is elevated (mg/L) in the point sources including pharmaceutical industrial effluent. In India, highest concentration of Ciproflaxin (31 mg/L) was reported in the effluent from a generic medicine production centre in Hyderabad. To improve the removal of these emerging contaminants, pre-treatment of the highly concentrated pharmaceutical wastewater can be done before it is let into a domestic waste water treatment plant. In this work, treatment of synthetic pharmaceutical industry effluent containing critical pharmaceutical contaminants (PC) Metformin employing a photocatalytic system was investigated. Chosen factors include concentrations of contaminants (50 – 100 mg/L), TiO2 dosage (500 – 1000 mg/L) and reaction time (10-30 min). MINITAB software was employed to perform the standard regression analysis and the corresponding second-order polynomial equation was constructed between the chosen response (contaminant removal) and the three factors.

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2018

Prakash Chinnaiyan, S.G. Thampi, M. Kumar, and Dr. Meera Balachandran, “Photocatalytic Degradation of Metformin and Amoxicillin in Synthetic Hospital Wastewater: Effect of Classical Parameters”, International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 2018.[Abstract]


In this study, photocatalytic degradation of synthetic hospital wastewater containing two pharmaceutical contaminants, namely amoxicillin trihydrate (a commonly used antibiotic) and metformin HCl (a widely used diabetic medicine), was carried out using a laboratory-scale photoreactor (200 mL), TiO2 as photocatalyst, and 125 W low-pressure mercury vapour lamp emitting UV rays at 365 nm. The response surface methodology based on face-centred central composite design was used to optimize the independent variables, namely the initial concentrations of contaminants (10–50 mg/L), TiO2 dosage (250–1250 mg/L), initial pH (3–11), and reaction time (30–150 min). Results showed that both amoxicillin and metformin removals were influenced by all the four variables individually and also by the interaction between these variables. Response surface and overlaid contour plots were used to evaluate the optimum conditions. It was found that the maximum removal of amoxicillin (90%) and metformin (98%) could occur when the pH is 7.6, TiO2 dosage is 563 mg/L, and reaction time is 150 min for an initial concentration of the contaminants at 10 mg/L. Further experiments were conducted to evaluate the characteristics of photocatalytic degradation. Low adsorption of contaminants on TiO2 surface and negligible degradation of contaminants using acetonitrile as solvent suggest that hydroxyl radical attack could be the predominant pathway in the removal process. The COD and TOC analyses of the samples confirmed the mineralization of the compounds to more than 60%. © 2018, Islamic Azad University (IAU).

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2018

Prakash Chinnaiyan, S.G. Thampi, M. Kumar, and Dr. Mini K. M., “Pharmaceutical Products as Emerging Contaminant in Water : Relevance for Developing Nations and Identification of Critical Compounds for Indian Environment”, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, vol. 190, p. 288, 2018.[Abstract]


Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are contaminants of emerging concern and have been detected worldwide in water bodies in trace concentrations. Most of these emerging contaminants are not regulated in water quality standards except a few in the developed countries. In the case of developing countries, research in this direction is at a nascent stage. For the effective management of Pharmaceutical contaminants (PC) in developing countries, the relevance of PCs as an emerging contaminant has to be analyzed followed by regular monitoring of the environment. Considering the resource constraints, this could be accomplished by identifying the priority compounds which is again region specific and dependent on consumption behavior and pattern. In this work, relevance of pharmaceutical compound as emerging contaminant in water for a developing country like India is examined by considering the data pertaining to pharmaceutical consumption data. To identify the critical Pharmaceutical Contaminants to be monitored in the Indian environment, priority compounds from selected prioritization methods were screened with the compounds listed in National List of Essential Medicine (NLEM), India. Further, information on the number of publications on the compound as an emerging contaminant, data on monitoring studies in India and the number of brands marketing the compound in India were also analyzed. It is found that out of 195 compounds from different prioritization techniques, only 77 compounds were found relevant to India based on NLEM sorting. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

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2017

Ajith Babu, Prakash Chinnaiyan, and S. Abinaya, “Effect of dyeing and textile industry on noyyal river water quality, Tiruppur - A case study”, International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology, vol. 8, no. 10, pp. 1064 - 1071, 2017.[Abstract]


This paper evaluates the extent of degradation that has happened in the natural water body Noyyal River that flows through the four districts of Tamilnadu, India, due to the letting of wastewater from small scale industrial dyeing unit in the Tiruppur region, Tamil Nadu. Samples from river were taken and were analysed for the following physiochemical properties: hardness, total dissolved solids, alkalinity, pH, sulphates, DO, Iron and Manganese using standard procedure. In addition, the trace metals like Lead, Zinc, Copper, and Chromium were also analysed by using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The results were compared with the standards followed by the Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board (TNPCB). The results obtained indicate that many of the physiochemical properties of the water exceed the standard limits. In addition, the analysis for the trace metal content in the water indicates a high level of lead content, which is highly toxic and may result in nervous system disorders. Lead content in water could be attributed to many factors including the effluents from the textile industries, which uses lead mixed dyes.

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Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Title

2018

K. S. Swarnalakshmi, Prakash Chinnaiyan, S. Nivetha, and A. S. Nair, “Use of rice husk ash as an adsorbent to remove contaminants in water and comparison with advanced oxidation process - A study”, in Materials Today: Proceedings, 2018, vol. 5, pp. 24248-24257.[Abstract]


With increasing population and associated consumption of materials, new contaminants are detected in water whose sources are worldwide and are categorized as emerging contaminants. Conventional treatment setups fail to remove these diversified compounds, as they were not designed to remove the same. In this scenario, different materials were tried to remove these contaminants as adsorbent and catalyst. In this study, rice husk ash (RHA) was used as adsorbent in batch study to remove selected contaminants. The contaminants chosen were Acid Orange 7, Amoxicillin, Metformin and Carbamazepine. In addition, established nanomaterial TiO2 was used both as adsorbent and catalyst in advanced oxidation process (AOP) to compare efficiency of removal by RHA againstTiO2. AOP experiments were performed with the aid of central composite design and the parameters varied include reaction time, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage and pH levels. Colorimeter and HPLC were carried out to find the concentration of dye and pharmaceuticals respectively. Comparison revealed that adsorption with RHA is an economically feasible option while TiO2 as catalyst in AOP, although expensive had better removal efficiency for dye. RHA proved to be an effective absorbent for pharmaceuticals also. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd.

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2018

A. Akshaya, Prakash Chinnaiyan, D. Unni, and G. Keerthana, “Use of TiO2 and Rice Husk Ash to study the removal of Reactive Yellow Dye as contaminant in water”, in Materials Today: Proceedings, 2018, vol. 5, pp. 24268-24276.[Abstract]


The presence of dyes in the water sources is nowadays a well-established issue and has become a matter of both scientific and public concern. Processes such as advanced oxidation process (AOP) and adsorption has proved useful in the treatment of such emerging contaminants. In this study, commercially available nanomaterial Tio2 (size 25 nm) and rice husk ash (RHA) was used to check the removal efficiency for the trace water contaminant namely, reactive yellow dye (RYD), which is a commonly used textile dye. In this study, TiO2, a photoactive compound, was used as a catalyst in AOP and as an adsorbent in adsorption process. Comparison was made for removal efficiency between TiO2 as a catalyst and as an adsorbent. Experiments were conducted by varying the parameters such as dye concentration, pH, TiO2 concentration and reaction time to study the removal of dye. Batch Adsorption Test was conducted by employing TiO2 as adsorbent. Comparative studies were done by employing rice husk ash (RHA) also as adsorbent. It was found that for an initial concentration of 10mg/l of RYD, 87.5% removal was achieved at a pH of 3, TiO2 10mg/l for a time period of 60 minutes using AOP. For 50mg/l RYD concentration, adsorption using RHA and TiO2 was performed. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd.

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