Qualification: 
MS, BAMS
dr-anjalimv@ay.amrita.edu

Dr. Anjaly M. V. currently serves as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Prasutitantra & Striroga, Amrita School of Ayurveda, since January 2017. She completed her BAMS in 2011 from Parassinikkadavu Ayurveda Medical College and Post-Graduation (MS in Prasutitantra and Striroga)in 2016 from Amrita School of Ayurveda. She also worked as Clinical Registrar at Amrita Ayurveda Hospital from 2012 to 2015. She was the first rank holder and Gold medallist in BAMS degree from Parassinikkadavu Ayurveda Medical College (Kannur University) in the year 2011.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Journal Article

Deepthy S., Anjaly M V, and Hemavathi SK, “Ayurvedic Understanding of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding In Non Gravid Women”, Asian Journal of Medical and Health Research , vol. 2, no. 7, 2018.[Abstract]


Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the main gynaecological complaints encountered by the ayurvedic physicians nowadays. It may be defined as any bleeding from the genital tract which is a deviation from the normal in frequency, cycle and quantity . The conditions in which there is abnormal vaginal bleeding occurs is explained under different entities in ayurveda. Some of them are raktayoni, lohitakshaya, asrigdara, nashtartava, artavakshaya etc. Although most of the menstrual disorders are due to vata and pitta , the way in which they vitiate( samprapti) varies. The modern science have clearly given the classification of PALMCOEIN to explain the causes of abnormal uterine bleeding in non gravid women of reproductive age group. A detailed analysis of abnormal uterine bleeding seen in nongravid women explained in ayurvedic classics will be done which will help in diagnosing with samprapti ghatakas and give clear knowledge to samprapti vighatana (cikitsa) of the disease.

More »»

2018

Journal Article

Anjaly M V, Amritha M. R, and Hemavathi SK, “A glimpse of yonivyapat in relation to vaginitis : A review”, International Journal of Research in Ayurveda and Pharmacy (IJRAP), vol. 8, no. 4, 2018.[Abstract]


Vaginitis, is one of the common gynaecological complaints reported by women irrespective of their age and socio economic status. The common types of vaginal infections are vaginal candidiasis (CV), trichomoniasis (TV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). In Ayurveda, diseases of female reproductive system are explained mainly under the heading of “yoni vyapat”. Yoni vyapats characterized with abnormal vaginal discharge such as slaishmiki, paittiki, paripluta, upapluta etc can be considered to be as the explanation for vaginitis in Ayurveda classics. This article aims to present common types of vaginitis through the lens of Ayurveda, discussing the concepts of the disease explained in bṛhatreyi.

More »»

2018

Journal Article

Sitharasatheeshan, Anjaly M V, and Hemavathi SK, “Ayurveda and female reproductive health”, International Journal of Current Advanced Research, vol. 7, no. 1 (C), pp. 8892-8899, 2018.[Abstract]


Ayurvedic concept of ‘A healthy progeny occurs from a healthy womb by the union of healthy sperm and ovum’ is of great value in this era of rising infertility and menstrual disorders. According to ayurveda the predominance and various permutations of doshas (VATA, PITTA, KAPHA) bring out different bodily changes in different phases of a women’s life. Based on these changes she is called by the terms kanya, gowri, mugdha, athirooda, vridha. Also there is description regarding dietetics and regimens that a women should follow in these different stages of ageing. Considering the concept of “prevention is better than cure”, it will be better to restore health naturally with slight modification in life style. This article gives a brief idea about the various ayurvedic practices and concepts in specific epochs of women’s life.

More »»

2018

Journal Article

Aparna S, Anjaly M V, and Hemavathi SK, “Concept of pathya in preconceptional care: A review”, International Journal of Herbal Medicine, vol. 6, no. 2, Part A, pp. 16-21 , 2018.[Abstract]


Preconceptional care can be defined as the care or advice given to a couple planning for a pregnancy well before the time of actual conception. Modern obstetrics forwarded preconceptional care as an extension of antenatal care to provide multidimensional health to both partners and forthcoming child. The antiquity of this concept dates back to time before Christ. Ayurveda is blessed with its unique concepts of pathya and apathya sankalpana. Proper observance of pathya right from the time of rajaswala kala till the garbhadhana kala is the main emphasis in this review. This review will put a light on several wholesome and unwholesome diets, conducts and their mode of action on basis of ayurveda in relation with preconceptional care.

More »»

2018

Journal Article

A. Krishnan, Anjaly M V, and Hemavathi SK, “Physiological changes in Pregnancy – An Ayurvedic perspective”, International Journal of Current Innovation Research , vol. 4, no. 3(A), pp. 1116-1119, 2018.[Abstract]


Pregnancy is a magical phase in women's life. Women take measures to remain healthy and well-nourished as the growing foetus depends entirely on its mother’s body. The internal system of the maternal body has to undergo certain changes to create ample conditions for the favourable growth of the foetus. As a result, certain physiological changes take place in pregnant lady which are mentioned in Ayurvedic classics under sadyogruheeta garbhalakshana and vyaktha garbha lakshanas. This physiological change during pregnancy favours the growth of the foetus in the uterus. The symptoms during pregnancy may be either physiological or due to some underlying pathology. So it becomes the responsibility of the physician to carefully distinguish the two.

More »»

2017

Journal Article

Hemavathi SK, S.R Divya Rani, and Anjaly M V, “Ayurvedic understanding of hirsuitism(atilomata)”, International Journal of Applied Ayurveda Research, vol. 3, no. 2, 2017.[Abstract]


In Ayurvedic classics atilomatā has been mentioned under aṣṭa nindita puruṣā. The disease condition can be considered as the hirsutism which is defined as the presence of male pattern coarse hairs in females. Classical references regarding the various pathological conditions exhibiting atilomatā has been detailed. A better understanding of the condition can be applied in clinical practice as hirsutism is having a huge psychological impact in young females. A clear samprāpti as such is not available. Understanding of samprāpti vighaṭana is done on the basis of the normal physiology and pathology related in formation of keśa and loma. Atilomatā is seen as a symptom along with some disorders like naṣṭārtava, prameha, bīja avayava duṣṭi, puṣpagni jātahāriṇi etc. So based on the pathology of disease and involvement of doṣā and duṣya, prognosis and management of the disease can be planned.

More »»

2017

Journal Article

Anjaly M V, “Management of asrgdara through ayurveda– a case report ”, Prajnananam Journal of Health Sciences , vol. 2, no. 2, 2017.

2017

Journal Article

D. J. Sreenath, Anjaly M V, Hemavathi SK, and Nalinakshan, A., “A survey on the somatovegetative symptoms of menopausal women in a village of kollam district in kerala”, International Journal of Applied Ayurved Research , vol. 3, no. 3, 2017.[Abstract]


Menopause is a universal phenomenon and an unavoidable physiological transition process in a woman’s life which marks the end of women’s reproductive capacity. Unlike men women are having a more complex and stressful aging process, resulting from hormonal changes that occur during the transition period. The present study was a cross sectional survey study done in 250 menopausal subjects with an aim to assess the somato-vegetative symptoms that is mentioned in the menopausal rating scale (MRS). It is observed that out of the 4 somatovegetative symptoms (hot flushes, heart discomfort, sleep problems and joint and muscular discomfort) joint and muscular discomfort is the most frequent symptom and while considering the severity using the S-score it is observed that 37% of subjects had moderately severe somato-vegetative symptoms.

More »»

2017

Journal Article

Anjaly M V, Parvathy Unni Krishnan, Narayan, P., and Krishnarajabhatt, H. Shivapura, “An Ayurvedic treatment protocol to improve anti mullerian hormone: A prerequisite for assisted reproductive technique – A case report”, AYU, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 66-69, 2017.[Abstract]


Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) produced by granulosa cells of preantral and antral follicles acts as a potential marker for ovarian reserve useful in predicting ovarian response to controlled ovarian stimulation. A woman undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with low AMH has poor success rate and ultimately the couple is left with the only option of IVF with a donor egg. The signs and symptoms of a patient with low AMH level can be compared to Dhatukshayajanya Vandhyata. The present case report documents the efficacy of an Ayurvedic treatment protocol in improving the AMH value, which is a prerequisite for assisted reproductive technique (ART) without a donor egg. The patient with low AMH level was subjected to Ayurvedic management protocol including Shamana for 3 months and Shodhana procedure for 21 days. The follow-up was done for 3 months. A marked improvement in the AMH level was noted in the first 3 months and also after the follow-up period, thus making her eligible for ART with her own egg.

More »»

2016

Journal Article

Parvathy Unni Krishnan and Anjaly M V, “Ethics and Facts of assisted reproductive technology in infertility”, Prajnananam Journal of Health Sciences , vol. 2, no. 2, 2016.