Qualification: 
Ph.D, MSc, BSc
Email: 
pandurangan@am.amrita.edu

Dr. N. Pandurangan, is working as Senior Research Fellow (CSIR-SRF) at the Amrita School of Biotechnology, Amritapuri from 2009 August. He obtained M.Sc., degree (Chemistry) from Periyar University in 2006. His earlier experience, in industry for three years dealing with synthesis of specialty chemicals. After joining this school, he worked on extraction of medicinal plants and isolated the products. He was awarded CSIR-SRF fellowship in 2013 after starting his research. He is also working on synthesis of organic compounds. He is well-versed with the modern techniques of isolation and characterization of natural and synthetic products. He is also studying the bioactivies includes computational chemistry of various natural and synthetic flavonoids. Presently he is developing a diversity oriented synthesis for various biological studies. 

Educational qualification

  • Ph. D. 
  • M.Sc., Chemistry, Periyar University (2006).
  • B.Sc., Chemistry, Bharathiar University (2003).

Area of Interests

  • Natural product chemistry- Isolation and Characterization
  • Natural product synthesis
  • Heterocyclic chemistry
  • Docking studies
  • Analytical chemistry and techniques

Experience

He was working as a Research Associate in R & D, Merchem Limited, Cochin for 3 years on heterocyclic compounds and their applications to rubber industries.

Training

Mini project (2 months) on Docking studies under the guidance of Prof. Krishnan Namboori, CEN lab, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Coimbatore.

Awards

He obtained national fellowship for SRF from CSIR on 2013 (CSIR-SRF).

Projects ongoing

  • Diversity oriented synthesis for the preparation of bioactive oxygen heterocyclic compounds- Application to syntheses of flavones, flavonols, isoflavones and biflavones.
  • Phytochemical analysis of Berberis tinctoria- endamic plant to The nilgiris.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2016

Journal Article

A. Madhavan, Nanjan, P., K. Shetty, S., and Shanmugham, S., “A rapid and selective method for the quantification of naringenin in order to monitor naringinase activity”, International Journal of ChemTech Research, vol. 9, pp. 333-338, 2016.[Abstract]


Sodium acetate (NaOAc) can selectively ionize 7-OH of naringenin generating a bathochromic shift of 41nm in its UV absorbance. This principle is used in the described spectrophotometric method that can detect naringenin amidst naringin and prunin present in the incubation mixture of naringinase. The method could be adopted for real sample analysis as it remains unaffected by the presence of phenolics such as ascorbic acid, gallic acid, citric acid and cinnamic acid. © 2016, Sphinx Knowledge House. More »»

2015

Journal Article

P. Nanjan, Dr. Jyotsna Nambiar, Dr. Bipin G. Nair, and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Synthesis and Discovery of (I-3,II-3)-Biacacetin as a Novel Non-zinc Binding Inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9”, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 23, pp. 3781 - 3787, 2015.[Abstract]


Abstract Eleven biflavones (7a–b and 9a–i) were synthesised by a simple and efficient protocol and screened for MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitory activities. Amongst them, a natural product-like analog, (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin (9h) was found to be the most potent inhibitor. Molecular docking studies suggest that unlike most of the known inhibitors, 9h inhibits MMP-2 and MMP-9 through non-zinc binding interactions.

More »»
PDF iconsynthesis-and-discovery-of-I-3-II-3-biacacetin-as-a-novel-non-zinc-binding-inhibitor-of-mmp-2-and-mmp-9-29march2015.pdf

2014

Journal Article

Ka Amrutha, Nanjan, P., Shaji, S. Ka, Sunilkumar, Da, Subhalakshmi, Ka, Rajakrishna, Lb, and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Discovery of lesser known flavones as inhibitors of NF-κB signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells-A SAR study”, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol. 24, no. 19, pp. 4735-4742, 2014.[Abstract]


<p>Seventeen flavonoids with different substitutions were evaluated for inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in the invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. They were screened using an engineered MDA-MB-231 cell line reporting NF-κB activation. The modulation of expression of two NF-κB regulated genes involved in tumorigenesis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also analyzed in these cells. Among the compounds tested, all except gossypetin and quercetagetin inhibited the activation of NF-κB, and the expression of MMP-9 and COX-2 to different degree. Methylated flavone, chrysoeriol (luteolin-3′-methylether), was found to be the most potent inhibitor of MMP-9 and COX-2 expressions. The effect of chrysoeriol on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis was analyzed by established methods. Chrysoeriol caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M and inhibited migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. The structure-activity relations amongst the flavonoids as NF-κB signaling inhibitors was studied. The study indicates differences between the actions of various flavonoids on NF-κB activation and on the biological activities of breast cancer cells. Flavones in general, were more active than the corresponding flavonols. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p>

More »»

2014

Journal Article

P. Nanjan and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “A new synthesis for acacetin, chrysoeriol, diosmetin, tricin and other hydroxylated flavones by modified baker-venkataraman transformation”, Letters in Organic Chemistry, vol. 11, pp. 225–229, 2014.[Abstract]


Baker-Venkataraman (BV) rearrangement is the method of choice for the synthesis of flavones. The major limitation of BV is that it requires extensive protections and deprotections of hydroxyl groups which make the process lengthy and cumbersome. In the present study, a three step efficient method has been developed using simple protecting groups and easily available starting materials. New syntheses for acacetin, chrysoeriol, diosmetin, tricin and other hydroxylated flavones are described. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/120227/article#sthash.yQrZK0AA.dpuf

More »»

2014

Journal Article

K. Amrutha, Nanjan, P., Shaji, S. K., Sunilkumar, D., Subhalakshmi, K., Rajakrishna, L., and Banerji, A., “Discovery of lesser known flavones as inhibitors of NF-κB signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells—A SAR study”, Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters, vol. 24, no. 19, pp. 4735–4742, 2014.[Abstract]


Seventeen flavonoids with different substitutions were evaluated for inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in the invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. They were screened using an engineered MDA-MB-231 cell line reporting NF-κB activation. The modulation of expression of two NF-κB regulated genes involved in tumorigenesis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also analyzed in these cells. Among the compounds tested, all except gossypetin and quercetagetin inhibited the activation of NF-κB, and the expression of MMP-9 and COX-2 to different degree. Methylated flavone, chrysoeriol (luteolin-3′-methylether), was found to be the most potent inhibitor of MMP-9 and COX-2 expressions. The effect of chrysoeriol on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis was analyzed by established methods. Chrysoeriol caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M and inhibited migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. The structure–activity relations amongst the flavonoids as NF-κB signaling inhibitors was studied. The study indicates differences between the actions of various flavonoids on NF-κB activation and on the biological activities of breast cancer cells. Flavones in general, were more active than the corresponding flavonols.

More »»

2012

Journal Article

A. Omanakuttan, Dr. Jyotsna Nambiar, Harris, R. M., Bose, C., Nanjan, P., Varghese, R. K., Kumar, G. B., Tainer, J. A., Dr. Asoke Banerji, J. Perry, J. P., and Dr. Bipin G. Nair, “Anacardic Acid Inhibits the Catalytic Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9”, 2012.[Abstract]


Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1′ pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50&nbsp;of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action.

More »»

2011

Journal Article

P. Nanjan, Bose, C., and Banerji, A., “Synthesis and Antioxygenic Activities of Seabuckthorn Flavone-3-ols and Analogs”, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol. 21, pp. 5328 - 5330, 2011.[Abstract]


A practical synthesis of polyhydroxy- and regiospecifically methylated flavone-3-ols which are components of commercial ‘seabuckthorn flavone’ has been achieved by modified Algar–Flynn–Oyamada method. Antioxidant activities of seabuckthorn extracts, isolated products and a number of flavone-3-ols have been determined. Structure–activity relationships have been discussed. Amongst the compounds tested, gallic acid, which is also present in seabuckthorn, was found to be the most effective antioxidant and radioprotectant. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2015

Conference Paper

Dr. Jyotsna Nambiar, Kumar, G. B., Nanjan, P., Dr. Asoke Banerji, and Dr. Bipin G. Nair, “Regulation of Gelatinases by (I-3,II-3)-Biacacetin, a Novel Non-zinc Binding Inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9”, in The XXXIX All India Cell Biology Conference, 2015.[Abstract]


Gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) play a significant role in cancer progression by cleaving the major components of the extracellular matrix thereby promoting the migration of tumor cells. Majority of the MMP inhibitors reported are zinc chelating compounds which bind to the catalytic zinc via hydroxamate, carboxylate, thiol or phosphonic acid moieties. The extensive homology between catalytic domains of the MMPs makes these effective zinc binding inhibitors non-selective and toxic. To overcome such non selective toxicity, novel non-zinc binding MMP inhibitors have been developed.(I-3,II-3)-Biflavones form a small group of dimeric flavonoids which have not been extensively studied due to their limited occurrence. Among several differently substituted biflavones having hydroxy, methoxy, furano and cinnamyl moieties,(I-3,II-3)-biacacetin showed maximum inhibition of gelatinases without interfering with the zinc in the catalytic site.This novel non-zinc binding interaction of (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin was further confirmed by treating the cells with ZnCl2 along with(I-3,II-3)-biacacetin and showing that the inhibition remained unaffected even in the presence of ZnCl2.(I-3,II-3)-biacacetin showed significant reduction in migration of highly metastatic fibrosarcoma cell line, HT1080. The mechanism of (I-3,II-3)-biacacetinmediated modulation of cell migration through inhibition of gelatinases was further established by treating the cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)along with (I-3,II-3)-biacacetinand using the same conditioned media for the migration assay. (I-3,II-3)-biacacetininhibitedPMA-stimulated gelatinase activity as well as migration of HT1080 cells in a concentration-dependent manner.These results suggests the use of (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin as a novel template for design and synthesis of analogswith improved potency and selectivity.

More »»

2013

Conference Paper

P. Nanjan, Bose, C., Schrenk, W., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Value addition to unutilized Indian plants & plant products”, in 14th Asian Symposium on Medicinal Plants, Karachi, 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

P. Nanjan, Schrenk, W., Bose, C., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Isolation, Charecterization Of Bioactives From The Indian Seabuckthorn”, in The Sixth Conference Of International Seabuckthorn Association, Potsdam2013, Germany ISA , 2013.

2013

Conference Paper

A. Madhavan, S, S., Bose, C., and Nanjan, P., “Screening, Production, Purification and Application of Naringenase Elaborated by Aspergillus Species of Section Nigri”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kollam, Kerala, 2013.

2012

Conference Paper

P. Nanjan and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Regiospecific Synthesis and Comparative Radical Scavenging Activities of Flavones and Flavonols”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kollam, 2012.

2010

Conference Paper

C. Bose, Nanjan, P., and Banerji, A., “Finger-Printing Of Secondary Metabolites In Medicinal Plants”, in U.G.C. sponsored National seminar on Medicinal Plants and Pharmacopia, Kollam, 2010.

2010

Conference Paper

P. Nanjan, Bose, C., and Banerji, A., “Anti-Oxidants from Common Plants”, in U.G.C. sponsored National seminar on Medicinal plants and Pharmacopia., kollam, 2010.

2010

Conference Paper

C. Bose, Nanjan, P., and Banerji, A., “Isolation and Characterization of Bioactive Constituents of Himalayan (Ladakh) Seabuckthorn”, in National Conference on seabuckthorn : emerging trends in production to consumption, CSK Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University Palampur (H.P.). , 2010.

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2015

Conference Proceedings

D. Nedungadi, ,, Nanjan, P., Nair, B. G., Dr. Asoke Banerji, and Dr. Nandita Mishra, “Caspase Independent Cell Death in Malignant Breast Cancer Cells MDA MB-231 by Chalcone Derivatives”, XXXIX All India Cell Biology Conference,IISER. Trivandrum, India, 2015.

2012

Conference Proceedings

P. Nanjan, Bose, C., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Synthesis and Antioxigenic Activities of Seabuckthorn and analogs flavones-3- ols”, National seminar on M odern trends in organic chemistry. Dept of Chemistry, Baselius College, Kottayam , 2012.

2011

Conference Proceedings

C. Bose, Nanjan, P., and Banerji, A., “Isolation, Characterization and synthesis of Bioactive flavanols from seabuckthorn ”, Poster presentation Medicinal chemistry in India. Med chem. Congress. NIPER/IICT,Hyderabad, India, 2011.

2011

Conference Proceedings

S. C.M., Bose, C., Nanjan, P., P., T. Mathew, and Banerji, A., “Bioprospection of Kerala flora for Phytoecdysoids : Value addition to biodiversity”, National symposium on Innovative and modern technologies for agricultural productivity, food security and environmental management . The society for applied biotechnology, Mangalore, Karnataka, 2011.

Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2014

Book Chapter

P. Nanjan, Bose, C., Singh, V., and Dr. Asoke Banerji, “Isolation, Characterization and Chemical Fingerprinting of Bioactives from Indian Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.) Species”, in Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.) : A Multipurpose Wonder Plant : Vol. IV: Emerging Trends in Research and Technologies, vol. 4, 2014, p. 262.

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