Qualification: 
Ph.D, M.E
Email: 
k_nithya@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Nithya K. serves as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences at Amrita School Engineering, Coimbatore. She obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Madurai Kamaraj University and Master’s degree in Environment Management from Anna University, CEG campus. She has 10 years of experience in teaching Chemical Engineering. She also plays the role of the academic coordinator in the department. She is the Co- Developer of the course Sustainability and Green chemistry under National Mission Project on Education through ICT, Pedagogy Project for developing suitable pedagogical methods for various classes’ intellectual calibers and research in e-learning.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2020

K. Athira, Dr. Asha Sathish, Nithya K., and Guhananthan, A., “Corn cob immobilised Chlorella sorokiniana for the sequestration of chromium ions from aqueous solution”, Materials Today: Proceedings, 2020.[Abstract]


In the present study the microalgae (Chlorella sorokiniana) immobilized on corn cob was examined for the removal of chromium ions from aqueous solution. The efficiency of the algae inoculated corn cob was compared with that of free corn cob and free algal species. The algal species were inoculated into the matrix of corn cob in order to increase its performance as the biosorbent. Algae inoculated corn cob was found to show 25% better chromium removal efficiency. The parameters influencing the adsorption like concentration, pH, contact time was optimized through batch studies. The maximum adsorption efficiency shown by the inoculated corn cob was 11.24 mg/g. The chromium biosorption showed maximum efficiency after 16 h of contact time. The biosorption process was well explained by the Langmuir isotherm model and it followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The sorption process was pH dependent and maximum chromium removal efficiency was obtained at a pH of 2.5. For regeneration of the adsorbent, 0.1 N NaOH is used as the eluting agent. The regeneration studies confirmed that 60% of the sorbed chromium was eluted in two hours.

More »»

2020

G. Govindankutty, S. Hareendran, Dr. Asha Sathish, and Nithya K., “Controlled functionalisation of graphene oxide using ethylene diamine: a one-pot synthesis approach for chromium sorption”, Micro Nano Letters, vol. 15, no. 12, pp. 817-821, 2020.[Abstract]


Introduction of ethylene diamine into the layers of graphene oxide was achieved through direct compounding method. Graphene oxide intercalated with ethylene diamine was characterised by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) techniques. The efficiency of the material in adsorbing chromium was evaluated through batch scale studies by optimising parameters like pH, concentration and contact time. The material renders a monolayer adsorption capacity of 69.93 mg/g, at pH 1 within 60 min time period for a minimal dosage of 0.05 g. The ethylene diamine modified graphene oxide thus appeals to be a promising adsorbent for environmental applications.

More »»

2020

S. Mohan, Govindankutty, G., Dr. Asha Sathish, and Nithya K., “Spirulina platensis-capped mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles for the adsorptive removal of chromium”, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, 2020.[Abstract]


Abstract The magnetic nanoparticles prepared through the co-precipitation method were surface modified using Spirulina platensis. The mesoporous and superparamagnetic nature of the adsorbent was confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses, respectively. Further, an increased specific surface area of 75.3 m2/g was reported in the BET studies. Parameters such as pH, contact time, concentration, and temperature were studied to optimize the operating conditions influencing adsorption. Thermodynamic studies justified the spontaneity and endothermic nature of adsorption. The adsorbent exhibited a better performance at 1.5 pH and 120 minutes of contact time. The monolayer adsorption capacity of the material was found to be 29.23 mg/g from the evaluation of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The second- order kinetic studies suggest the predominance of chemisorption. Further, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirmed that the adsorption mechanism is electrostatic attraction accompanied by reduction. Notably, a regeneration efficiency of 75.26% was achieved with NaOH as the desorbing agent.

More »»

2020

Nithya K., Dr. Asha Sathish, and Senthil Kumar P., “Packed bed column optimization and modeling studies for removal of chromium ions using chemically modified Lantana camara adsorbent”, Journal of Water Process Engineering, vol. 33, p. 101069, 2020.[Abstract]


The current study proposes to address the growing concerns related to chromium discharges from metal plating facilities. For this purpose, acid treated Lantana camara is synthesized and continuous adsorption experiments were conducted on the fixed bed column set up. Some of the desirable attributes of the adsorbent are their favourable functional groups and the porous nature. These findings are reported in the FTIR and SEM analyses as well. In the column experiments run using laboratory simulated solution, considerably, the highest adsorption capacity of 362.8 mg/g is obtained. Since these results are favourable, column experiments have also been performed on composite electroplating effluents containing chromium ions. Notably, for composite electroplating effluents, maximum bed capacity of 50.05 mg/g is obtained. Another key point is the favourable breakthrough time reported for 100 mg/L chromium solution, which is 1260 min. Further, models such as Thomas, Yoon -Nelson, and Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) have also shown excellent fits. On the whole, the results revealed that the developed column is effective in handling effluent-containing chromium. Besides, this study also provides a better understanding of the adsorption process in composite industrial effluents.

More »»

2020

Nithya K., Dr. Asha Sathish, and Senthil Kumar P., “Magnetite encapsulated alginates tailored material for the sustainable treatment of electroplating industrial wastewater: column dynamics and mass transfer studies”, Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy, 2020.[Abstract]


The current study proposes the use of magnetic beads for the treatment of nickel ions of the industrial wastewater system. More specifically, the removal of nickel ions is studied in single and multi-metal ion systems which enabled the scalability of nano-enabled technology to industrial systems. The current synthesis neither involves expensive precursors nor complex procedures. Indeed, the improved surface properties of the adsorbent are due to the use of Lantana camara, in the synthesis. The surface properties and functional attributes of the magnetic beads were characterized by FTIR and SEM analyses. The breakthrough experiments were done for selected column depths, varying feed flow rates and metal ion concentrations. In particular, the interventions of the interfering ions of the electroplating effluents are captured in the breakthrough analysis. Besides the lowest bed capacity reported in the multi-metal systems, the column operated with nickel ions showed a maximum bed capacity of 12.36 mg/g at a flow rate of 2 mL/min in the 20 cm bed. Furthermore, an extended breakthrough time of 780 min is obtained for 50 mg/L nickel ion solution at a flow rate of 2 mL/min. In addition, the modelling of breakthrough curves using Thomas, Yoon–Nelson and BDST models have shown reasonable fits. In addition, repeated cycles of regeneration studies showed improved efficiency of 65% in the first cycle. More specifically, the alginate validated the selective preferential adsorption of cationic substances over anionic components in the studied column.

More »»

2018

Gopika G., Nithya K., and Dr. Asha Sathish, “Adsorption studies of amine-modified green synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles for the removal of nickel from aqueous solution”, Desalination and Water Treatment, vol. 121, pp. 53-64, 2018.

2017

Nithya K., Sathish, A., Senthil Kumar P., and T. Ramachandran, “Functional group-assisted green synthesised superparamagnetic nanoparticles for the rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution”, IET Nanobiotechnology, vol. 11, no. 7, pp. 852-860, 2017.[Abstract]


Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using the capping agent derived from the Lantana camara fruit extract were used to study the adsorption of chromium ions. Characterisation techniques such as scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to study the NP features and adsorption mechanisms. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found to be 41 mg/g. The chemical nature of the adsorption is confirmed with the results of Dubinin-Radushkevich model and thermodynamic studies. In addition, thermodynamically favourable and spontaneous adsorption is considered to be a good indication for the removal of metal ions. Out of the kinetic models investigated, the experiments exhibited the best fit to pseudo-second-order model, advocating for surface-based adsorption, involving both physical and chemical interactions. It is also significant to note that 85% of the adsorption occurs in the first 10 min, and hence the selected adsorbent is also claimed for rapid removal of metal ions. The newly synthesised adsorbent hence possesses remarkable properties in terms of simple synthesising technique, low cost, rapid uptake and improved efficiency without generating harmful byproducts. © The Institution of Engineering and Technology 2017.

More »»

2016

Nithya K., Dr. Asha Sathish, Kumar, PcSenthil, and Dr. Ramachandran T., “Biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using raw and acid-treated biosorbent prepared from Lantana camara fruit”, Desalination and Water Treatment, vol. 57, no. 27, pp. 25097-25113, 2016.[Abstract]


The aim of the present investigation was to explore the performance of the acid-treated Lantana camara fruit biosorbent in binding hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions. FTIR studies revealed the contribution of carbohydrates, glycosides, and flavonoids in the biosorbent. EDS analysis exhibited the occurrence of chromium ions after biosorption, whereas SEM image exposed the enhancement of porosity after acid treatment. The isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin–Radushkevich, and Temkin models were studied to depict the mechanism of interaction of the biosorbent with the adsorbate. Besides isotherm models, kinetic studies like pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were also performed to validate the controlling mechanism of biosorption. Langmuir model showed a better fit favoring monolayer adsorption and a high correlation value from the pseudo-second-order model suggests chemisorption. To understand whether the biosorption process releases or absorbs energy, thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The outcome of the findings showed endothermic nature of the process with increased randomness at the solid solution interface. Regeneration studies showed better results with 0.2 M NaOH solutions. The obtained maximum uptake capacity of 83 mg/g with a minimal biomass dosage proves the credible potential of the selected biosorbent in removing toxic hexavalent chromium. © 2016 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

More »»

2015

Nithya K., Dr. Asha Sathish, and T. Ramachandran, “Batch, kinetic and equilibrium studies of biosorption of chromium (VI) From aqueous phase using activated carbon derived from Lantana camara fruit”, Oriental Journal of Chemistry, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 2319-2326, 2015.[Abstract]


Batch experiments have been conducted to determine the maximum adsorption capacity of activated carbon derived from Lantana camara fruit to remove hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. The removal efficiency and uptake capacity of the biosorbent were determined by varying several batch level parameters. Highest removal efficiency of the biosorbent was found to be almost 99% under optimal conditions. Maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was determined to be 86 mg/g. The experimental data best fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm and pseudo second order model. These findings conclude that the selected biosorbent has more promising features in binding hexavalent chromium in aqueous media.

More »»

2015

Nithya K., Dr. Asha Sathish, Dr. Gangadharan D., Vinaykumar, A., Tharakan, D. M., and Sruthi, B., “Batch, kinetic and equilibrium studies of hexavalent chromium from aqueous phase using Galaxaura Ornate Seaweed”, International Journal of ChemTech Research, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 1947-1956, 2015.[Abstract]


Batch studies have been carried out to study the feasibility of adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto Galaxaura ornate seaweed. The equilibrium data and biosorption capacity of chromium was determined by varying the pH, dosage of adsorbent, contact time and initial metal ion concentration. The maximum adsorptive capacity was obtained at a pH of 2 at an equilibrium time of 120 minutes. Highest removal efficiency for raw biomass was found to be 71% for hexavalent chromium under optimal conditions. The biosorption isotherms were determined using Langmuir and Freundlich models. Based on the correlation coefficient value it was found that the data fits well both to Langmuir (R2=0.99) and Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R2=0.98) representing monolayer adsorption as well as adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces. The findings of the kinetic study infer that pseudo second order model show a better fit for a wider range of concentrations studied than the pseudo first order kinetics. The results indicate that the identified seaweed has the potential to adsorb chromium (VI) from the aqueous solution. © 2015 Sphinx Knowledge House. All rights reserved.

More »»

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Title

2019

Nithya K., Dr. Asha Sathish, A. Sanganathan, A. Pooja, and S. Balamurugan, “Rapid sorption of chromium ions using neem extract capped green synthesized magnetic nanoparticles”, Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on "Advances in Materials and Manufacturing Applications (IConAMMA 2019)” organized by Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham ,Bangalore, India, August 29-31. 2019.

2019

A. Namitha, T. Shyam Sundar, Dr. Asha Sathish, and Nithya K., “Process Optimization Studies for Algae Production and Biodiesel Extraction using Monoraphidium and Chlorella Sorokiniana”, First International Conference on Recent Trends in “Clean Technologies for Sustainable Environment”, SSN College of Engineering, Chennai, 25 – 27, September. 2019.

2019

Balamurugan, Adithyaa, V., Nithya K., and Dr. Asha Sathish, “Anthocyanin assisted mesoporous magnetite nanoparticles for sorption of chromium ions: modeling, characterization and application studies”, First International Conference on Recent Trends in “Clean Technologies for Sustainable Environment”, SSN College of Engineering, Chennai, 25 – 27, September. 2019.

2019

P. S. S. Subramaniam, B. Bharatwaj, N., R. Kumar, A., and Nithya K., “Chlorella sorokiniana waste-based biomass for sorption of chromium ions from aqueous solution- a sustainable approach”, First International Conference on Recent Trends in “Clean Technologies for Sustainable Environment”, SSN College of Engineering, Chennai, 25 – 27, September. 2019.

2018

S. Sundar, Dr. Asha Sathish, and Nithya K., “Investigation of the blue-green algae based bio diesel using n-hexane and n-hexanol solvents: Diesel engine emission parameter and characterization studies”, International Conference on Advances in Materials and Manufacturing Applications (IConAMMA)” held at Amrita School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bengaluru Campus, Karnataka, India. from 16 - 18th August. 2018.

2018

Nithya K. and Dr. Asha Sathish, “In-situ synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in L. camara adsorbent for the sorption of nickel ions: adsorption, isotherm and kinetic studies”, TECHNOSCAPE18- An International Conference on Sustainable Water Resources: Innovations and Impacts, organized by the School of Chemical Engineering, Vellore Institute of Technology - VIT, in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India, between September 6th and 8th. 2018.

2017

Nithya K., Sathish, A., and A. Sanganathan, “Plant extract capped magnetite nanoparticles for the rapid removal of Ni (II) ions from aqueous solution”, 2nd International Conference on Recent Advancements in Chemical, environmental and Energy Engineering ( RACEEE 2017). SSN College of Engineering, Chennai, Tamilnadu, p. 35, 2017.

2014

Nithya K., .Ramachandran, T., and .Asha, S., “A review on biosorption of hexavalent chromium”, Proceedings, National Conference on Recent Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment ( RAWWT 2014), . The Gandhigram Rural Institute, Deemed University, Dindigul ,Tamil Nadu, p. 63, 2014.

2013

Nithya K. and Nagendran, R., “Sustainable Tourism Plan for Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary”, Proceedings of National Conference on Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve Silver Jubilee Celebration ( NBRSJC). Department of Zoology & Wildlife Biology, Government Arts College, Udhagamandalam, Tamilnadu, p. 119, 2013.

2010

Dr. Geetha Srikanth, Nithya K., and , “Antibacterial Potential of Aquous Extract of Coleus Ambonicus Against Selected Pathogens”, Proceedings of 2nd National Conference on Current Scenario in Microbial Biotechnology (CSMB-2010). Department of Biotechnology, K. S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Tiruchengode, Tamilnadu, pp. 112-117, 2010.

2008

S. Ramachandran, T. Ramachandran, Dr. Satheesh Babu T. G., and Nithya K., “Comparative Study of Removal of Fluoride from Ground Water by Bio-sorption using Fresh Water Algae based BioMass and Surface Modified Activated Carbon”, Proceedings of International Conference CHEMCON 2008, Green Technology and Sustainable Development, 61st Annual Session of IIChE . Panjab University, Chandigarh, p. 137, 2008.

Courses and Labs Handled

Inorganic Chemical Technology Environmental Studies Mass Transfer lab
Chemical Technology Introductory Modern Biology Chemical Technology lab
Material Science Environment Engg. For Process Industries Inorganic & Physical Chemistry lab
Mechanical Operations Work Environment & Safety Engineering Drawing
Engineering Management Mechanical Operations lab Engineering Graphics
Environmental Science & Engineering Chemical Reaction Engineering lab Fluid Mechanics lab