Qualification: 
MA, B.Ed.
shilpamchandran@am.amrita.edu
Phone: 
8086377965

Shilpa M. Chandran currently serves as an Assistant Professor and a Research Scholar at the department of English, Amrita School of Arts and Sciences, Amritapuri. She has been working in Amrita since 1st July 2015. She has one year of teaching experience at College of Applied Science, Nadapuram, Calicut.

Shipa worked as a certified Trainer for the skill development executives under ASAP (Additional Skill Acquisition programme) jointly initiated by General and Higher Education Departments, Govt. of Kerala. She has participated in National Seminar on Translation and the Nation organised by the Dept. of English, Pondicherry University.

EDUCATION

  • 2009: M. A. English
    Pondicherry Central University
  • 2010: B.Ed.
    University of Calicut
  • 2010: SET
    Kerala State
  • 2012: UGC NET
     

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2018

S. M. Chandran, Krishnakumar, S., and S, H., “Emotional and Psychological Trauma: a Study of Yejide Kilanko’s Daughters Who Walk This Path”, CIKITUSI Journal for Multidisciplinary Research, vol. 5, no. 12, 2018.[Abstract]


Literature is the reflection of the life in all its varied forms and shapes. Literature is the mirror to life and society. Literature shows how the idea of memories holding the emotional thread to relate the human experiences in different ways. It represents the social, political, cultural and historical growth of society at a great length. Commonwealth Literature is a vast term which defines English Language works written in the formal British colony or places which had the status of dominions. Nigerian literature is begin with the oral tradition, pioneered by the unsung heroes of her literary past like warriors, story tellers, priests and many others. Yejide Kilanko’s debut novel Daughters Who Walk This Path tells the life story of Morayo, a small, determined girl growing in the city of Ibadan. The happiness in her life is changed by the arrival of her older male cousin, Bros T. He comes to love with her family and begins to sexually molest her. She painfully suppresses Bros T’s sexual violence from everyone. At last she broke her silence to the parents but they didn’t support her and later she turns for aunt Morenike and she has given all the support and understanding to Morayo than her parents. Morenike’s story is told along with Morayo’s. By the time Morayo reaches university, there she reacquainted with her first love, kachi. . Later she got job in Bank Lagos and in there she comes face to face with Bros T and it led to trauma. In the end she gets support from her family to overcome the trauma.

More »»

2018

S. M. Chandran and Mohan, A., “Dysfunctional Family in Christina Stead’s The Man Who Loved Children”, Pramana, vol. 8, no. 12, 2018.

2017

S. M. Chandran and Nair, A. S., “Humanising the Divine: A Select Study of Amish Tripathi’s Immortals of Meluha”, English Language and Literature, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 456-465, 2017.[Abstract]


This research paper makes an attempt to discover how Shiva as a man distinguishes from Lord Shiva and the extent to which the author succeeds in presenting Shiva Trilogy as a spiritual guide to modern generation. Amish chooses the most multi-faceted god from Hindu Mythology to weave his tale about. He presents Shiva as a moral being asking, “What if Lord Shiva was not a figment of rich imagination but a person of flesh and blood?”. Amish amends Shiva Purana by redefining Lord Shiva as a man of flesh and blood who later transforms to godly stature because of his karma. Human centred approach revolves throughout the novel which empower the author to present Shiva Trilogy as a spiritual guide to upcoming generation as it equip them to discover Mahadev with in them to absorb evil and perspire goodness.

More »»

2016

S. M. Chandran, “Myth as a Symbolic Narrative: A Study of the Selected Myths of Malabar Theyyam Cult”, English Language and Literature, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 486-490, 2016.[Abstract]


Symbolism refers to the use of symbols to suggest concepts and possibilities by attributing to them symbolic connotations that are dissimilar from their literal meanings. Symbolism takes diverse forms. Symbolism supplements double levels of implications to a work: a literal one that is irrefutable and the symbolic one whose meaning is far more intense than the literal one. Symbolism makes the plot, characters and the motifs of literature universal. The paper is an attempt to analyse the myths underlying Theyyam as symbols of the travails of the lower caste people. Theyyam is a pattern of hero worship performed in the Kolathunadu region of the North Malabar area of Kerala, India, as a living culture with several thousand years of tradition, rituals and customs. The art is performed by the people of the lower class community. Theyyam rituals mostly take place either within the precincts of a small shrine which is usually called Kavu or in the courtyard of an ancestral house, or in a wide space with a temporary shrine called pathi. There are various myths underlying each Theyyam performance. These myths tell us the story of a lower class man/woman who was subjected to the cruelties of the upper caste society and it’s after effects and how these men/women are deified. Therefore these myths are stories justifying the deification of the downtrodden people which is an uncommon occurrence. At the same time, they act as symbols representing the sufferings of these people and how they function as resistance narratives. These myths can also be read as weaved stories that can act as a shield to protect the oppressed community from the tortures of the aristocratic groups.

More »»

2016

S. M. Chandran, “Torn Between the Dual Identities: A study of Anita Nair’s Mistress”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature (RJELAL), vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 452-456, 2016.[Abstract]


Post colonialism refers to an academic discipline which analyses, describes and responds to the cultural legacies of colonialism and imperialism. Postcolonial reading of a text delves into the identity of a person as a colonizer as well as the colonized. This emphasis on identity as doubled or unstable one is a major characteristic of the postcolonial approach. Another major aspect of postcolonial studies is its representation of the ‘subalterns’. Though the term broadly implies peasants, working classes, tribal, and women, Gayatri Spivak suggests that subaltern is not just a classy word for "oppressed", for the Other, but for everything that has limited or no access to the cultural imperialism. This paper seeks to analyse these two aspects of postcolonial reading in the character of Shyam from Anita Nair’s Mistress. Shyam is a victim of the doubled identity as he is a success in his social life who hails from a poor family and raises himself to be a great businessman envied by many and at the same time a failure in his marital life where his wife despises him and falls in love with Chris, a foreigner. His poor background gives him an inferiority which makes him unable to control his wife or scuffle with Chris. Though Shyam tries to subjugate Radha with love, he fails in it due to his subaltern identity. He is again traumatized by the so-called ‘subaltern’ identity when he had to witness Radha falling in love with Christopher Stewart, a traveler writer who comes to meet Koman, Radha’s uncle. His masculinity is questioned when his wife conceives from Christopher after eight long years of their marriage in vain. Though Shyam attempts to exercise his supremacy over his wife, he is ruled out by Christopher. It can be seen that Radha, whom Shyam regards as his own Syamantakam is preempted by Chris and Shyam is dismissed from his own life. Shyam’s identity is reduced to that of a subaltern status when his wife is surmounted by Christopher. More »»

2015

S. M. Chandran, “Defining Indian American Identity through Home and Family in Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth”, Tetso Interdisciplinary Journal , vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 45-51, 2015.[Abstract]


Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earthm mainly focuses on the lives of the first and second generation Indian immigrants who have settled in America. The characters of these stories face the challenges of belonging to two different cultures and strive to maintain ties to both cultures. The second generation Indian immigrants find themselves caught between the culture and traditional values of their immigrant parents and the mainstream culture of the American society they live in. In most of these stories home and family has a crucial role in the formation and the development of Indian American identity. Migrant families maintain their ethnicity through preservation of the native language, religions and cultural traditions.Family, being a visible social institution, its choice and representation allows the immigrants to embrace or reject one of their confusing identities, either Indian or American. This paper analyses the role of home and family as crucial elements in shaping the identities of the first and second generation Indian Americans in the selected text More »»

2014

S. M. Chandran, “Feminist Retelling of Ramayana: A study of Sara Josephs selected works”, Research Essence, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 65-71, 2014.[Abstract]


This paper focuses on the attempt of reconstructing Rama as a common man and crumbling his iconic figure in Sara Joseph's writings. Rama through out India is regarded as God himself, an avatar of Lord Vishnu. Many versions of Ramayana portrays him as God, while some other versions sees him as the most noble man in the world. But Sara Joseph's writings give voice to the other marginalised characters in Ramayana. The words of these marginalised characters brings to light how the alteration of Dharma and Adharma takes place when the women characters who were deprived of justice start composing their own epics. Through her retellings Sara Joseph has succeeded in bringing out most of the injustices that predominated in the patriarchal society. In short Valmiki' s icon of Dharma is thus constructed as the performer of Adharma. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Title

2016

S. M. Chandran, “Myth as a Symbol: A Study of the Theyyam Myths of North Malabar”, in Symbolism in Art, Archaeology and Literature, Pune, 2016.

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Title

2016

S. M. Chandran, “Torn Between the two: Celebrating the trauma of misplaced identities in Anita Nairs Mistress”, UGC sponsored National seminar on Divergent Voices: Trends in Postcoloniality. Post graduate Department of English, Nirmala College, Muvattupuzha and IJPCL, 2016.

2014

S. M. Chandran, “The role of Home and Family in shaping the Indian American identity in Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth”, International Seminar on Contemporary American Literature: Trends and Prospects. Postgraduate Department of English and Research Centre for Comparative Studies, Mercy College, Palakkad , 2014.