Qualification: 
Ph.D, MSc, BSc
Email: 
r_yamuna@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Yamuna R. currently serves as Associate Professor at the Department of Sciences (Chemistry), School of Engineering, Coimbatore.

She has served as Principal Investigator for CSIR, DST, DRDO and MHRD Centre projects. Her areas of research include Liquid Crystalline Material for Fuel Cell Applications, Nano Materials, Porphyrins, Lead Acid Battery, Non Linear Optical Material. 

AFFILIATIONS

QUALIFICATIONS

YEAR DEGREE/PROGRAM INSTITUTION
1998-2005 Ph. D. in Chemistry
Thesis: Cobaloximes with Mixed Dioxime and Glyoxime as the Equatorial Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization, Cis-trans Influence and Crystal Structure Studies
Indian Institute of technology, Kanpur
June-December, 1998 Project Assistant Anna University Chennai, India.
1995-1997 M. Sc. (Applied Chemistry) Anna University, Chennai, India
1992-1995 B. Sc. (Chemistry) RVG Govt. Arts college, Chenglepet, India

CERTIFICATES, AWARDS, HONORS, AND SOCIETIES

  • 2012:Membership in Indian Society for Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering.
  • 2012: Received fast track young scientist project from DST, India.
  • 1999-2001: Institute fellowship, I.I.T. Kanpur.
  • 2002 – 2005: Senior Research Fellowship (SRF) of CSIR, New Delhi.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My group’s primary research interest is in the design and synthesis of Liquid crystalline organocobaloximes with new or modified equatorial and axial ligands. Organocobaloximes, initially proposed as models of the Vit B12 coenzyme, have attracted the growing interest of scientists due to their potential applications as catalyst in organic synthesis and rich co-ordination chemistry with almost unlimited possibilities for substituents in the axial and equatorial position. Metallomesogens have fascinated much interest due to the capability of the metal ion to play either structural role or a functional role (i.e, imparting physical or chemical properties). Liquid crystalline cobaloximes are promising in view of their facile synthesis and low cost.

Cobaloxime complexes are among the best synthetic transition metal catalysts known for H2 production. They are relatively easy to synthesize and are oxygen tolerant. Cobaloximes can be readily coupled into natural and artificial photosynthetic systems. Recently, photo catalytic supramolecular assemblies containing a cobaloxime active site for solar cell and fuel cell applications have also been reported in the literature. Our interest here to synthesis and characterize new organometallic compounds for H2 production.

X-ray crystallography is useful in identifying known materials, characterizing new materials and in perceptive materials that appear similar by other experiments. X-ray crystallography is widely used in biological research. Conformation of biomolecules plays a major role in the design of new drugs. The crystal structures of various organic compounds determined in the present study own medicinal, biological and pharmaceutical importance.

Porphyrin-based functional photonic materials have been the cornerstone of research because of their structural rigidity, thermal stability, photochemical, and electrochemical properties. Linking porphyrins to material systems can improve the photochemical and redox properties of the systems. To facilitate the absorptivity of photo absorbers in case of photochemical devices nano materials are functionalized with chromophores such as azo benzene. Porphyrin functionalized carbon nanomaterial shows high third order non-linear optical properties. 

VRLA battery has been developed into a versatile and extremely reliable energy-storage device. The most commonly used gelling agent, fumed silica, has many disadvantages such as, contamination of the local working environment, particularly during paste-mixing, and occupational hygiene and handling problems. It is also bulky to transport and has long gel times unless used at very high concentrations. Therefore, there is an increasing demand for an alternative gelling agent for sulfuric acid in the production of gelled-electrolyte (GEL) VRLA batteries. It is expected that gel batteries with tubular positive plates can display excellent performance.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Journal Article

G. PRABHAVATHI, Arjun, M., and Dr. Yamuna R., “Synthesis, characterization and photoluminescence properties of tetra(aminophenyl) porphyrin covalently linked to multi-walled carbon nanotubes”, Journal of Chemical Sciences, vol. 129, pp. 699-706, 2017.[Abstract]


Synthesis of a new nano hybrid of 5,10,15,20-mesotetra(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAP) functionalized with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through an amide linkage is reported for the first time. This MWCNT-TAP hybrid was characterized by Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), absorption and emission spectroscopy. TGA analysis reveals that there is a ∼ 60% weight loss when heated from 150–750∘C , which is attributed to the amount of TAP molecules that were attached to MWCNTs. Electronic properties of MWCNTs were improved in the hybrid compared to raw MWCNTs as evidenced by Raman spectra. The absorption and emission spectra of TAP and nano-hybrid indicate strong positive solvatochromism with increasing solvent polarity. Fluorescence quenching of TAP in different solvents were observed in the emission spectra in the MWCNT-TAP hybrid, indicating that covalent functionalization facilitated effective energy or electron transfer from porphyrin moiety to the MWCNT. Graphical Abstract: SYNOPSIS 5,10,15,20-mesotetra(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAP) was covalently functionalized with MWCNTs through an amide linkage. Fluorescence quenching of TAP by MWCNTs were observed in different solvents. The absorption and emission spectra of this nano-hybrid exhibits strong positive solvatochromism, increasing with the solvent polarity. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]. © 2017, Indian Academy of Sciences.

More »»

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Yamuna R., Sarath, S., Kubandiran, K., Umadevi, M., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “Synthesis, characterization and thermal studies of 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane bridged dicobaloximes”, Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, vol. 811, pp. 40-47, 2016.[Abstract]


Twelve different 1,3 bis(4-pyridyl)propane (dpyp)-bridged dicobaloximes of the type [RCo(dmgH)2]2-μ-1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane where R = Me - octyl (1a-8a), decyl (9a), dodecyl (10a), tetradecyl (11a), 1-chlorohexyl (12a) have been synthesized from their corresponding aqua complexes. All the synthesized cobaloximes have been characterized by 1H, and 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, UV-visible (UV-Vis) and FT-IR spectroscopy. The X-ray structures of 2a and 8a are reported. Thermal stability of these complexes has been studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study reveals that there is a mesophase in these ligand-bridged dicobaloximes with higher alkyl chains. These dpyp-bridged complexes are significant due to the flexible spacer of dpyp in between two cobaltmetallobicycles which influence extensive intermolecular C-H⋯O interactions in the crystal packing diagram of the structures 2a and 8a. The mesophase formation for these complexes strongly depends on the length of the alkyl chain (axial R group). © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. More »»

2015

Journal Article

M. Umadevi, Saravanan, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “Crystal structure of (2-bromomethyl-1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(phenyl) methanone”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications, vol. 71, pp. o86–o87, 2015.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C22H16BrNO3S, the phenyl rings make dihedral angles of 84.81 (16) and 61.67 (17)° with the indole ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.012 Å), while the phenyl rings are inclined to one another by 69.5 (2)°. The mol­ecular structure is stabilized by weak intra­molecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds. The sulfonyl S atom has a distorted tetra­hedral configuration. In the crystal, there are no significant inter­molecular inter­actions present.

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2015

Journal Article

M. Umadevi, Saravanan, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “Crystal structure of [2-methyl-1-(phenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](phenyl) methanone”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications, vol. 71, pp. 133–135, 2015.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C22H17NO3S, the sulfonyl-bound phenyl ring is almost orthogonal to the indole ring system, making a dihedral angle of 84.89 (7)°. The carbonyl-bound phenyl ring forms a dihedral angle of 57.32 (5)° with the indole ring system. The two phenyl rings are inclined at 52.68 (7)°. The S atom has a distorted tetra­hedral configuration. In the crystal, weak C-H...O inter­actions link the mol­ecules, forming a helical chain along the b-axis direction.

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2015

Journal Article

U. M., P., R., Dr. Yamuna R., A.K., M., and G., C., “Crystal structure of 3-(2-nitrophenyl)-1-(1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl)propan-1-one”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications, vol. 71, pp. o892-o893, 2015.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C23H18N2O5S, the phenyl and benzene rings subtend dihedral angles of 78.18 (10) and 30.18 (9)°, respectively, with the indole ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.022 Å). The crystal structure features weak C - H⋯O and C - H⋯π interactions, which link the molecules into a three-dimensional network. More »»

2015

Journal Article

Dr. Yamuna R., Chakkaravarthi, G., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., Raju, P., and Umadevi, M., “Crystal structure of ethyl 2-phenyl-9-phenylsulfonyl-9H-carbazole-3-carboxylate”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications, vol. 71, no. 10, pp. o725-o726, 2015.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C27H21NO4S, the dihedral angles between the carbazole ring system (rms deviation= 0.015 Å) and the sulfur-bonded and directly linked benzene rings are 79.98 (11) and 53.51 (18)°, respectively. The benzene rings subtend a dihedral angle of 48.4 (2)°. The ethyl side chain of the ester group has an extended conformation [C—O—C— C=− 172.3 (3)°]. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of weak C—H⋯ O hydrogen bonds generate R22 (22) loops. The dimers are linked by weak C—H⋯ π and π–π More »»

2015

Journal Article

M. Umadevi, Raju, P., Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “Crystal structure of (E)-diethyl 2-[(1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylidene]succinate”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications, vol. 71, pp. o1029-o1030, 2015.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C23H2 3NO6S, the phenyl ring is perpendicular [dihedral angle = 89.34(9)°] to the indole ring system. In the molecule, the ethoxy groups are each disordered over two sets of sites with occupancy ratios of 0.671(6):0.329(6) and 0.75(3):0.25(3). The molecular conformation is consolidated by a weak C - H⋯O interaction, which generates an S(6) graph-set motif. The packing of the molecules in the crystal structure features weak C - H⋯π interactions.

More »»

2014

Journal Article

R. DEVI, PRABHAVATHI, G., Dr. Yamuna R., Ramakrishnan, S., and KOTHURKAR, N. I. K. H. I. L. K., “Synthesis, characterization and photoluminescence properties of graphene oxide functionalized with azo molecules”, Journal of Chemical Sciences, vol. 126, pp. 75–83, 2014.[Abstract]


Two different azo molecules functionalized graphene oxide (GO) through an ester linkage have been synthesized for the first time. Chemical structure of the azo-GO hybrids was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy. The GO functionalized with 5-((4-methoxyphenyl)azo)-salicylaldehyde was further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SEM studies demonstrated that the morphology of the azo-GO hybrid was found to be similar to the GO sheets but slightly more wrinkled. Further, TEM image of azo-GO indicates some dark spots on the GO sheets due to azo functionalization. AFM results also reveal that the azo functionalization increases the thickness of GO sheet to 4–5 nm from 1.2–1.8 nm. Both the azo-hybrids show absorption band around 379 nm due to the $π$–$π$* transition of the trans azo units. Photoluminescence spectra of azo-GO hybrids show a strong quenching compared with azo molecules due to the photoinduced electron or energy transfer from the azo chromophore to the GO sheets. It also reveals strong electronic interaction between azo and GO sheets. More »»

2013

Journal Article

M. Umadevi, Saravanan, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “1-(2-Bromomethyl-1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl) propan-1-one”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, vol. 69, pp. o1802–o1803, 2013.

2013

Journal Article

M. Umadevi, Saravanan, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “(E)-1-[2-(4-Fluoro-2-nitrostyryl)-1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl] propan-1-one”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, vol. 69, pp. 1780–1780, 2013.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C25H19FN2O5S, the substituted phenyl ring makes a dihedral angle of 12.26 (9)° with the indole ring system. The nitro group is twisted at an angle of 26.92 (8)° out of the plane of the ring to which it is attached. The mol­ecular structure is stabilized by weak C-H...O hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, weak C-H...O, C-H...F and [pi]-[pi] [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6645 (11) Å] inter­actions link the mol­ecules, forming a three-dimensional network.

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2013

Journal Article

M. Umadevi, Saravanan, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. K., and Chakkaravarthi, G., “(Z)-3-(1-Chloroprop-1-enyl)-2-methyl-1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indole”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, vol. 69, no. 12, pp. o1781-o1781, 2013.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C18H16ClNO2S, the indole ring system forms a dihedral angle of 75.07 (8)° with the phenyl ring. The molecular structure is stabilized by a weak intramolecular C—H⋯ O hydrogen bond. In the crystal, molecules are linked by weak C— H⋯ O hydrogen bonds, forming a chain along [10-1]. C—H⋯ π interactions are also observed, leading to a three-dimensional network. More »»

2013

Journal Article

Ma Umadevi, Saravanan, Vb, Dr. Yamuna R., Mohanakrishnan, A. Kb, and Chakkaravarthi, Gd, “(E)-1-[2-(4-Chloro-2-nitrostyryl)-1-phenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl] propan-1-one”, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, vol. 69, p. o1784, 2013.[Abstract]


In the title compound, C25H19ClN2O 5S, the phenyl ring forms dihedral angles of 79.62 (12) and 80.02 (13)° with the indole ring system and the benzene ring, respectively. The nitro group is twisted at an angle of 22.39 (11)° with respect to the attached benzene ring. In the crystal, molecules assemble into double layers in the ab plane via C-H⋯O interactions.

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2013

Journal Article

Dr. Yamuna R., Ramakrishnan, Sb, Dhara, Ka, Devi, Ra, Kothurkar, N. Kb, Kirubha, Ec, and Palanisamy, P. Kc, “Synthesis, characterization, and nonlinear optical properties of graphene oxide functionalized with tetra-amino porphyrin”, Journal of Nanoparticle Research, vol. 15, 2013.[Abstract]


The synthesis of a porphyrin-graphene oxide hybrid (GO-TAP) was carried out by covalently functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with 5,10,15,20 mesotetra (4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAP) through an amide linkage. The GO-TAP hybrid has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The peak intensity of the Soret band of the material was suppressed compared to neat TAP. This indicates a strong interaction between the electronic energy level of TAP and GO in the GO-TAP hybrid. The functionalization of GO with TAP significantly improved its solubility and dispersion stability in organic solvents. Scanning electron micrographs reveal that the hybrid was found to be similar to the unmodified GO but slightly more wrinkled. Transmission electron micrographs also demonstrate that GO sheet in the hybrid is more wrinkled with some dark spot due to functionalization. Atomic force microscopy results also reveal that the TAP functionalization increases the thickness of GO sheet to 2.0-3.0 nm from 1.2 to 1.8 nm. We observed improved nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties for the hybrid compared to both graphene oxide and porphyrin. GO-TAP shows fluorescence quenching compared with porphyrin, indicating excellent electron and/or energy transfer to GO from TAP. Thermogravimetric analysis confirms that the GO-TAP hybrid has outstanding thermal stability. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

More »»

2010

Journal Article

Dr. Yamuna R., ,, Chakkaravarthid, G., ,, and Saravanan, V., “biological ”, Chakkaravarthi et al.(2008, 2010)., 2010.[Abstract]


A solution of 1-(2-(bromomethyl)-1-(phenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl) propan-1-one (5 g, 12.31 mmol) and triphenylphosphine (3.5 g, 13.54 mmol) in dry THF (100 ml) was refluxed for 6 h. After consumption of the starting material, the solvent was removed under vacuum and the solid washed with diethyl ether to give the phosphonium salt. Then, the mixture of phosphonium salt (8 g, 11.97 mmol), 4-chloro-2-nitrobenzaldehyde (2.45 g, 13.17 mmol) and K2CO3 (3.30 g, 23.95 mmol) in DCM (70 ml) was stirred at room temperature for 24 h More »»

2006

Journal Article

B. D. Gupta, Dr. Yamuna R., and Mandal, D., “Cobaloximes with mixed dioximes of glyoxime and diphenylglyoxime: synthesis, characterization, CV, X-ray studies, and crystal packing”, Organometallics, vol. 25, pp. 706–714, 2006.[Abstract]


Fourteen complexes of inorganic and alkyl cobaloximes with mixed dioximes of the type (R/X)Co(gH)(dpgH)Py have been synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR and UV. The spectral data are interrelated, and a good correlation is found between Δδ1H(Pyα) with δ1H(gH), δ13C(CNgH), and δ13C(CNdpgH) indicating the ring current throughout the Co(dioxime)2+ metallabicycle. All the spectroscopic data and CV show dependence on the field effect. The X-ray structure and crystal packing in ClCo(gH)(dpgH)Py, C2H5Co(gH)(dpgH)Py, and C8H17Co(gH)(dpgH)Py have been studied. ClCo(gH)(dpgH)Py shows a right-handed helix. More »»

2003

Journal Article

B. D. Gupta, Singh, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Barclay, T., and Cordes, W., “Organocobaloximes with mixed dioxime equatorial ligands: A convenient one-pot synthesis. X-ray structures and cis-trans influence studies”, Organometallics, vol. 22, pp. 2670–2678, 2003.[Abstract]


A simple and general route to the synthesis of organocobaloxime with mixed dioxime ligands, RCo(L)(dpgH)Py [L = dmgH and chgH] (R = Me-Dec), has been described. The crystal structure of four complexes, ClCo(L)(dpgH)Py and MeCo(L)(dpgH)Py [L = dmgH and chgH], is reported. The structural study reveals that both the nonclassical C−H···O as well as the classical O−H···O intermolecular hydrogen bonding is present and leads to the formation of one-dimensional dimeric or polymeric structures. 1H and 13C NMR coordination shifts in the axial pyridine ligand show clear correlations with the chemical shift of the equatorial ligand. These correlations can be rationalized with the aid of the ring current model. More »»

2003

Journal Article

B. D. Gupta, Dr. Yamuna R., Singh, V., and Tiwari, U., “Synthesis and characterization of and cis-trans influence in cobaloximes with glyoxime as the equatorial ligand”, Organometallics, vol. 22, pp. 226–232, 2003.[Abstract]


The synthesis and characterization of RCo(gH)2Py (R = methyl through decyl) and XCo(gH)2Py (X = Cl, Br, NO2, N3) is described. Most of these complexes are new and have been synthesized for the first time. The X-ray structure of N3Co(gH)2Py is reported. The cis−trans influence has been studied by 1H and 13C NMR, UV−vis, and X-ray diffraction. For a range of X ligands, a clear trend between the 1H and 13C chemical shifts of the axial and equatorial ligands as well as with the Co-dioxime CT band has been observed. More than 20 correlations have been found. δ(13C) values for CN, Pyα, Pyβ, and Pyγ in the alkylcobaloximes always occur upfield by 1−3 ppm compared to those in the inorganic cobaloximes, and δ(13C) for CN in gH complexes occur significantly upfield, by 12−13 ppm, compared to the values in the corresponding dmgH, chgH, and dpgH complexes. More »»

2001

Journal Article

B. D. Gupta, Dr. Yamuna R., Singh, V., Tiwari, U., Barclay, T., and Cordes, W., “Organocobaloximes with mixed dioxime equatorial ligands: a convenient one-pot synthesis. X-ray crystal structures of BnCo III (dmgH)(dpgH) Py and BnCO III (chgH)(dpgH) py”, Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, vol. 627, pp. 80–92, 2001.[Abstract]


A simple and general route to the synthesis of organocobaloxime with mixed dioxime ligands, RCo(dmgH)(dpgH)Py and RCo(chgH)(dpgH)Py, has been described. The 13C-NMR chemical shifts have been analysed to see whether one dioxime wing has any effect on the other dioxime wing. The first crystal structure of an organocobaloxime with mixed dioxime ligand in the same complex, BnCo(dmgH)(dpgH)Py and BnCo(chgH)(dpgH)Py, is reported. More »»

2001

Journal Article

Dr. Yamuna R., V. Kanth, V., Singh, V., Gupta, B. D., Oberoi, M., and Mandal, D., “Homolytic displacements at carbon in organocobaloximes: Reactions of organocobaloximes with free radical precursor with two radical centres”, Indian Journal of Chemistry, vol. 40, pp. 986–988, 2001.[Abstract]


The reactions of MeC6H4-SO2-SPh with organocobaloximes, RCo(dmgH)2Py, (R= alkyl, benzyl, butenyl and allyl) under visible light photolysis show that the alkyl, butenyl and benzyl cobaloximes form the corresponding sulphides whereas the allyl cobaloximes form the organic sulphones. More »»

2000

Journal Article

B. D. Gupta, Qanungo, K., Dr. Yamuna R., Pandey, A., Tewari, U., Vijaikanth, V., Singh, V., Barclay, T., and Cordes, W., “Synthesis, characterization and cis-trans influence in cobaloximes with nioxime”, Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, vol. 608, pp. 106 - 114, 2000.[Abstract]


A synthetic scheme leading to the (X)(Y)bis(1,2-cyclohexanedionedioximato)cobalt(III) complexes, where X=Cl, N3, ClCH2, CH3, \{C2H5\} and Y=PPh3 and Py is reported. The complexes have been characterized by the usual spectroscopic techniques and have been compared with the reported analogous compounds having other dioximes as the equatorial ligands. The first crystal structure of an inorganic cobaloxime with 1,2-cyclohexanedionedioxime (Nioxime) is reported. For a range of X ligands, a clear trend between 31P, 13C, 1H chemical shifts of the equatorial and axial ligands as well as with the Co→chgH charge transfer band has been observed. More »»

2000

Journal Article

B. D. Gupta, Singh, V., Qanungo, K., Vijaikanth, V., Dr. Yamuna R., Barclay, T., and Cordes, W., “Organocobaloximes with mixed-dioxime equatorial ligands: a one-pot synthesis”, Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, vol. 602, no. 1-2, pp. 1 - 4, 2000.[Abstract]


BenzylCo(dmgH)(dpgH)Py has been synthesized by the reaction of benzyl chloride with a mixture of CoI(dmgH)2Py and CoI(dpgH)2Py, generated in situ, by the NaBH4 reduction of ClCo(dmgH)2Py and ClCo(dpgH)2Py. A mixture of three products is formed. The first crystal structure of an organocobaloxime with a mixed-dioxime ligand is reported. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2014

Conference Paper

Dr. Yamuna R., Ramakrishnan, S., Prabhavathi, G., and Kothurkar, N. K., “A Comparative study of porphyrin functionalized carbon nano materials”, in 1st International symposium on Nanoparticle/Nanomaterial and Applications (ISN2A), Portugal, 2014.

2011

Conference Paper

K. Dhara, Ramakrishnan, S., Devi, R., Kothurkar, N. K., and Dr. Yamuna R., “Synthesis and Characterization of 5,10,15,20 meso tetra (4-aminophenyl) porphyrin-functionalized graphene oxide”, in 2nd International Conference on Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology(ICANN-2011), Guwahati, 2011.

2011

Conference Paper

R. Devi, Ramakrishnan, S., Dhara, K., Kothurkar, N. K., and Dr. Yamuna R., “Azo functionalized graphene oxide: synthesis and characterization”, in 2nd International Conference on Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology (ICANN- 2011) , Guwahati, 2011.

2009

Conference Paper

S. Asha and Dr. Yamuna R., “Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of cobalt(II) complexes of various alkyl substituted 2,6-Diphenyl-1-aza-7-oxa-4-spiro[2,5] octanes”, in International Conference on Coordination & Organometallic Chemistry (ICCOC-2009), Bharathiyar university, 2009.

2008

Conference Paper

Dr. Yamuna R., “Crystal engineering in cobaloximes: Lamellar, pillared, tubular and helical assemblies assisted by C-H…O, C-H…Cl and C-H…pi interactions”, in International symposium on Structural bioinformatics: Structure and functions of macromolecules (BIOFEST-08), Ramakrishna college of arts and science , 2008.

2004

Conference Paper

B. D. Gupta, Mandal, D., and Dr. Yamuna R., “Synthesis, Characterization and Oxygen Insertion Studies in Cobaloximes with Mesityl Glyoxime as Equatorial Ligand: X-ray Crystal Structure”, in 6th National Symposium in Chemistry, I.I.T Kanpur, 2004.

2004

Conference Paper

B. D. Gupta and Dr. Yamuna R., “Synthesis, Characterization and Oxygen Insertion of Cobaloximes with Glyoxime Equatorial Ligand: Novel Helical Supramolecular Structure Assisted by C-H.O Interactions”, in 6th National Symposium in Chemistry, I.I.T Kanpur, 2004.

2003

Conference Paper

B. D. Gupta and Dr. Yamuna R., “Cobaloximes with Mixed Dioxime Equatorial Ligand: Synthesis, characterization and X-ray studies ”, in 5th National Symposium in Chemistry, Chennai, 2003.

2001

Conference Paper

B. D. Gupta, Singh, V., Dr. Yamuna R., and Tewari, U., “Alkylcobaloximes with Mixed Dioxime Equatorial Ligands: A Convenient One Pot Synthesis ”, in 3rd National Symposium in Chemistry, Panjab University, 2001.

COURSES

CODE SUBJECT
CHY 100 Chemistry
SS 801 Advanced Organic Chemistry
SS 805 Organometallic and Bioinorganic Chemistry
SS 802 Advanced electrochemistry
CHY254 Polymer for Electronics
CHY211 Inorganic Chemistry
207
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