Dr. Yeti Nisha Madhoo is Adjunct Fellow/Professor at the Center for Economic Fragility & Governance, Amrita School of Business, Amrita University. Before joining Amrita, Dr. Madhoo was a faculty member in the Department of Economics and Statistics at the University of Mauritius for more than one and half decade. She has research interest in environmental economics, development economics and applied econometrics. She has presented research papers at several international conferences and workshops and published papers in edited volumes and international refereed journals. She has co-edited the book: Saving Small Island Developing States: Environmental and Natural Resource Challenges published by the Commonwealth Secretariat in London. She has also worked as overseas consultant to African Economic Research Consortium (AERC, Nairobi, Kenya), United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD, Geneva, Switzerland) and Commonwealth Secretariat, UK. Dr Madhoo was a Visiting Fellow at UC Berkeley (USA), University of East Anglia (UK), National University of Singapore (Singapore), University of Alberta (Canada)

QUALIFICATION

YEAR DEGREE INSTITUTION
2011 PDF Development Economics UC Berkeley, USA
2002 Ph.D. Economics University of Mauritius
1998 M.Phil. (Transfer) University of Mauritius
1993 B.Sc. (Hons) Economics University of Mauritius

PhD Thesis: Pricing Policy for Water Resources: A Case Study of Public Utilities in Mauritius, Submitted to Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Mauritius, Le Reduit, Mauritius

PDF Research: State Failure and Governance in Fragile States: A Comparative Analysis at Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley, USA

FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS

YEAR FELLOWSHIP/AWARD  INSTITUTION
Jan 1996 - Dec 1998 Tertiary Education Commission Doctoral Research Fellowship Government of Mauritius
Republic of Mauritius
Jan 1999 - Jan 2000 Commonwealth Scholarship for Doctoral Research University of East Anglia (UK)
Sep 2010 - June 2011 Fulbright Scholarship for Post-doctoral Research  University of California, Berkeley (USA)
YEAR NON-AWARD DEGREE COURSE INSTITUTION
1995 (July-November) Public Sector Economics (Graduate level) National University of Singapore
1995 (July-November) Econometric Modelling and Applications  (Post-graduate level) National University of Singapore
2011 (January-May) Advanced Econometric Modelling PhD Level (Audited) University of California, Berkeley, USA

EMPLOYMENT AND ATTACHMENT INCLUDING FOREIGN UNIVERSITIES

  • Adjunct Faculty, Amrita University School of Business, Amritapuri Campus, Kerala (October 2014- )
  • Visiting Fellow and Adjunct Faculty, Amrita University School of Business, Amritapuri Campus, Kerala (August 2013- July 2014)
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Mauritius, Le Reduit (August 2011- July 2013)
  • Visiting Fellow, University of California, Berkeley (UCB), Department of Economics, US (Sept 2010 – June 2011)
  • Lecturer, Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Mauritius, Le Reduit (September 2001- August 2010)
  • Visiting Fellow, University of East Anglia, School of Environmental Sciences, Norwich, UK (Jan. 1999-Jan. 2000)
  • Visiting Fellow, University of Alberta, Institute for Public Economics. Department of Economics, Alberta, Edmonton, Canada (June-Sep. 1998)
  • Research Fellow, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics, Singapore (July-Dec. 1995)
  • Alumni: University of Singapore, Department of Economics, Singapore; University of East Anglia, School of Environmental Sciences, Norwich, UK; University of California, Berkeley, Department of Economics, USA; Fulbright International Exchange Alumnus, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Department of State, USA
     

TEACHING EXPERIENCE (15 years)

Post-graduate: Applied Econometric Modeling, Research Methods for Policymakers, Policy Planning and Programme Evaluation, Environmental and Natural Resource Analysis, Economics of Public Utilities

Undergraduate: Managerial Economics, Industrial and Labour Economics, Project Appraisal, Environmental and Resource Economics, Development Economics, Comparative Economic Systems, Economic History of Mauritius, Principles of Econometrics, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics

Publications

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Year of Publication Publication Type Title
2014 Book Chapter Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Beneficiary Charges: The Cinderella of Subnational Finance”, in Taxation and Development: The Weakest Link? Essays in Honor of Roy Bahl, R. Bird and J. Martinez-Vazquez (eds.), USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, pp. 364-402.[Abstract]

The revenue objective to cover the identifiable costs (in full or partly) is important with respect to both fees and charges. All revenue sources – taxes, fees, fines and user charges – are instruments of cost recovery to meet the financial obligations of public administration and the public and private supply of public goods and services. In the case of publicly supplied local goods, such as public administration, public education, health services, street lighting and sanitation, cost recovery may not be the dominant objective. But cost recovery is tremendously significant in the case of privately supplied local public goods, such as water supply, sewerage, electricity and telephone. In recent years, user fees and charges have gained significance at the sub-national level mainly because of hard local budget constraints. Recession resulted in drastic cuts in intergovernmental transfers and reduced access to market loans. According to the 2009 International City and County Management (ICMA) State Survey in the US, for instance, 46 percent of reporting local governments increased existing fees by 23 percent and added new levies for additional funds (Ebel and Petersen, 2012). While these trends are encouraging, there is no systematic research to assess the efficacy of local government in collecting fees and user charges vis-à-vis performance of other institutional arrangements such as off- budget supply and privatization. The structure of this paper is as follows. Section 2 discusses the principles and practices of user fees and charges and their revenue potential. Section 3 analyzes factors adversely impacting the growth of beneficiary charges in local government budgets, including the centralization of revenue, intergovernmental fiscal transfers, and alternative fiscal strategies such as tax earmarking and piggybacking. Section 4 examines the trade-off between budgetary and privatization regimes of water supply and the efficacy of cost recovery policies. Section 5

More »»
2010 Book Chapter Yeti N. Madhoo, “Valuation of Non-market Environmental Goods and Services”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 32–47.[Abstract]

Environmental goods and services are shown as amenities having impact on an individual’s welfare. Some are goods and services in the traditional economic sense, for instance, food, timber, recreation, materials and technology. Such goods and services enter the market place where demand and supply forces determine their price. Markets can be local, national and international.When environmental goods and services are traded, their valuation is done in international prices using the exchange rate of countries involved. Valuation of marketed goods is less complicated because markets reveal information about supply of, and demand for, these goods and services.

More »»
2010 Book Chapter Yeti N. Madhoo, “Impact Assessment and Biodiversity Conservation: An Application of EIA and SEA”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 48–58.[Abstract]

One of the objectives underlying the valuation of environmental goods and services (which do not enter the market place) is to highlight their significance in economic and social terms. Moreover, such information is used to estimate the potential loss of these resources if conservation attempts are lacking. It has been discussed in the earlier chapter that putting a number on environmental resources is a stupendous task. For example, evaluation of damages to biodiversity is not only extremely difficult, but it would also lack scientific precision. Environmental impact assessment techniques are employed to directly assess damage to the natural, economic and social environment due to developmental proposals. They are intended as instruments of preventive environmental management. Biodiversity conservation initiatives internationally advocate the extensive use of environmental impact assessments to design effective strategies and plans.

More »»
2010 Book Chapter Yeti N. Madhoo, “Environmental Policy Instruments and Governance”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 59–71.[Abstract]

The major justification for environmental regulation stems from the public interest theory where environmental policy aims at promoting societal welfare by addressing various sources of market failure. For example, regulatory measures can be used to curb negative externalities like pollution or to control overuse of environmental resources having public goods or open access characteristics (see Chapter 1 for an excellent discussion of these issues). We begin with an overview of the various classes of environmental policy instruments.Next, criteria for choice between these instruments are discussed. The fourth section reviews practical considerations for effective implementation of environmental policies. More specifically,we seek to probe into causes of policy failure which is characteristic of developing countries and therefore a cause of concern for their sustainable development.This part of the discussion takes us to another strand of the economic literature which emanates from the ‘public choice’ school of thought. In essence, the conflicting interests and rent-seeking behavior of agents emerge as important constraints of environmental policy-making and implementation. The final section summaries the main issues.

More »»
2010 Book Chapter Yeti N. Madhoo, “An Illustration of the Tragedy of the Commons: The Demise of the Aral Sea”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 133–144.[Abstract]

The source of many environmental and natural resource problems lies in ill-defined property rights. In this chapter, we explain how the tragedy of the commons can result from existing types of ownership/property rights regimes and examine the consequences. The implications for policy-making are also briefly discussed. The dire consequences of the tragedy are illustrated by the case of the Aral Sea.

More »»
2008 Book Chapter Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “A shared growth story of economic success: The Case of Mauritius”, in The Political Economy of African Economic Growth, 1960-2000: Country Case Studies, edited by B. Ndulu, S. O’ Connell, J. Azam, R. Bates, A.K. Fosu, I. W. Gunning and D. Njinkeu , vol. 2, Cambridge : Cambridge Univ. Press, 2008, pp. 369-400.
Publication Type: Conference Paper
Year of Publication Publication Type Title
2014 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Fragile Economies: Contemporary Institutions vs. Colonial Incidence”, in 61st Annual North American Regional Science Conference (NARSC), Washington DC, USA, 2014.[Abstract]

The original contribution of this paper is that it empirically examines the role of pre-colonial and post-colonial institutions in reducing fragility by overcoming the negative effects of colonial governance. In a first stage, dynamic analysis of state fragility establishes the existence of a low equilibrium fragility trap, which can largely be attributed to persisting effects of colonial rule, measured by a computed index of colonial incidence. This situation is compounded as increases in current output and quality of secondary schooling seem insufficient to push countries out of extreme fragility -- a case of unmatched expectations during post-colonial period. It is worth noting that pre-colonial state governance and population abundance at time of independence (used as proxy for absence of massive slave trade) engender fragility-reducing impacts. These historical endowments however are not strong enough to overcome colonial drag. In a second stage, the paper extends the existing development literature on colonial and contemporary institutions by examining the efficacy of alternative institutions that matter more for weakening the force of colonial incidence (not attempted in the literature), apart from having significant fragility-reducing effects. In the economic development literature, colonial governance and weak post-colonial institutions are shown to be two major sources of under-development and state fragility. These studies however do not envisage the mechanism by which strong contemporary institutions succeed in overcoming the negative effects of colonial institutions that would have carried over and produced a drag on growth and state capacity during post-colonial period. The paper extends this strand of the literature by investigating the effectiveness of alternative contemporary institutions in weakening the force of colonial incidence (effect 2) apart from having significant fragility-reducing effects (effect 1). 3SLS results reveal that economic institutions captured by rule of law, government effectiveness, protection of property rights and transparency reduce state fragility and colonial incidence. Conversely, political institutions measured by democracy, civil liberties and political stability exhibit fragility-dampening effect but the force of colonial incidence is found to carry over in the presence of these institutions. Control on executives does not appear to generate either impact. Thus, economic institutions are found to be more effective in achieving the goal of fragility-reduction via colonial incidence mitigation, which may be a pre-condition for escaping the fragility trap. Interestingly, macro-policy exhibits limited success in mitigating state fragility while micro-policy and luck factors seem insignificant. Weak fragility-reducing effects of tropics, ethnic diversity and landlocked location require further research.

More »»
2012 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Biodiversity at Risk: Import as an Environmental Policy”, in 18th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC), UK, 2012.
2011 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Strategic Environmental Compliance in SIDS: How Important are Political Economy Factors?”, in 17th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC), USA, 2011.
2009 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Assessing the Effectiveness of Environmental Regulations in SIDS: How Important are Political Economy Factors?”, in 56th Annual Conference of North American Regional Science Association, USA, 2009.[Abstract]

The success of environmental regulation across the world and in particular LDCs is questionable. Political economy factors are often cited as being significant contributors to environmental policy failures. This contention however has not been systematically tested in the empirical literature with respect to small island developing states (SIDS), which need more attention in terms of environmental policy and governance. This paper seeks to address this gap in the literature. In the proposed models, effectiveness of environmental regulation is captured by (i) level of stringency of environmental regulations, (ii) the degree of enforcement, and (iii) the achievement of various pollution reduction and natural resource conservation goals (measures of environmental performance and sustainability). Cross-country regressions reveal that the perceived degree of enforcement and stringency of environmental regulations as well as overall environmental performance are adversely impacted by corruption and political instability in SIDS. Similar results are obtained for other LDCs. However, when we control for specificities of SIDS such as economic resilience, size, vulnerability and degree of competitiveness, the significance of political economy factors appears to lessen. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of the tourism sector and agricultural sectors in SIDS as important lobby powers in dampening the effectiveness of regulations. The paper finally discusses the environmental policy challenges in island economies in the light of empirical results.

More »»
2008 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Biodiversity at Risk: Analysing the Effectiveness of Fishing Policy Options in Mauritius”, in Workshop on Integrating Social and Ecological Data on a Regional Scale in the Western Indian Ocean, Mauritius, 2008.
2007 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “International Migration, Remittances and Economic Resilience of SIDs: A Cross-Country Analysis”, in 54th Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, USA, 2007.[Abstract]

While the relationships between international migration, remittances and economic development have been a standard subject of economic enquiry, no systematic attempt has been made to investigate their linkages with respect to economic resilience of small, island developing states (SIDs). This study is an attempt to address this gap. The first part of the paper develops a theoretical framework linking international migration and migrant remittances with economic resilience. An empirical model is formulated in part two. The following issues have been analysed using panel data for a sample of small, island states. 1. International migration having impact on economic resilience through labour market developments including migrants’ remittance behaviour. Whereas adverse implications are found for the labour market in the sense of lack of domestic labour supply, on the balance, international migration has strengthened economic resilience through positive impacts of remittances in some samples. The impact of expatriate labour is also assessed on local labour productivity and wages. The empirical results show that foreign and domestic labour wage and productivity linkages are not well aligned. This would give support to the presence of political economy factors. 2. The contribution of remittances to economic resilience in the presence of asymmetric information. Remittances have been found to finance consumption with no significant impact on investment decisions. Thus the capital market effects appear to diminish economic resilience. 3. Do remittances reduce aid flows and thereby increase resilience of a country? The objective here is to test for substitute and complementary relationship between remittances and foreign aid. It is shown that remittances and foreign aid are complementary. This would imply that small states are more open and have a tendency to increase recourse to foreign capital flows. Since more foreign aid is available to SIDs, the sensitivity analysis of these results has been performed, using high, medium and low aid regimes to support the above finding. 4. Linking remittances to economic resilience in the presence of altruistic motives. An interesting hypothesis is tested to ascertain whether there is any systematic association between remittances and strong and weak economic resilience. A negative relationship would establish the presence of altruistic motive underlying international remittances by migrant population. In other words, migrants help the weak motherland (low economic resilience) by higher remittances. In the case of a positive relationship, economic motives are discovered. This econometric investigation would involve developing an instrumental variable framework. 2SLS estimates are analysed. Our findings do not support the contention that altruistic motives are significant. These results are common to different groups of SIDs. 5. What is the impact of migrants’ remittances on public infrastructure development? It is found that despite leakages, these funds provide budgetary support to capital expenditures when foreign aid is taken into account. This would work through effective use of foreign aid and higher domestic resource mobilization in the presence of migrant remittances. This is an interesting finding because international financial flows (here foreign aid migrants’ remittances) may have a tendency to reinforce each other. This could be simply because both are routed through the government and central banking channels. 6. In the final part of the paper, policy issues are discussed. International remittances are important source of capital in all countries. It is however difficult to model the behaviour of migrant labour for the benefit of policymaking. Countries which gain from these transfers can consolidate on these benefits. In particular small, island states, and developing countries have initiated aggressive campaigns to influence international migrants. This is perhaps a good strategy for designing policies having positive impacts on economic resilience of financially weak countries.

More »»
2006 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Assessing the Impact of Climate Change and Natural Catastrophes on Agriculture - The Case of the Island of Mauritius”, in World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Climate Risk Conference, Finland, 2006.
2005 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Demographic and Regional Dimensions of the Incidence of Residential Water Charges: The Case of Mauritius”, in 52nd Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, USA, 2005.[Abstract]

This paper presents empirical results on progressive incidence of water charges that contradict conventional wisdom in developing countries and many developed countries (Whittington, 1992, 2003; Boland and Whittington, 2000). Water pricing policy is shown to possess the potential of redistribution. This finding is supported by traditional incidence exercise incorporating family size and metering, linear expenditure systems approach and error correction methodology. Family size among high income categories relative to low-income groups is larger in Mauritius. Because of this unusual demographic dimension, increasing block tariffs coupled with lifeline rates that are below long run marginal cost applicable to low-volume users produce this different result. It is important to document that extensive metering both in urban and rural areas allows low income consumers to benefit from increasing block tariffs. Regional disparities among residential water users further contribute to redistributive strategy. More precisely rural low-income households are subsidised by higher income consumers who reside predominantly in urban regions. A comparative analysis of price and income elasticities for different income categories reveals that low income households face more than average price elasticity of demand for water and less than average income elasticity. In the light of this result, it is established that increase in demand for water among richer households has the potential of improving equity in water charges. The computed marginal budget shares derived from linear expenditure system shows that the amount of supernumerary income would be higher for richer people so that a percentage increase in income may result in a higher level of spending on water as compared to lower-income households. In this case, water charges are found to be re-distributive.

More »»
2005 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Modelling Marine Biodiversity: A Case Study of Mauritius”, in Indian Ocean Marine Environment Conference , Australia, 2005.
2004 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo, “Modelling Efficiency of Irrigation Water Supply in Dry and Humid Regions: A Case Study of Mauritius”, in 51st Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, USA, 2004.
2003 Conference Paper Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Explaining Mauritian Growth”, in African Economic Research Consortium Workshop on Explaining African Economic Growth Performance, Kenya, 2003.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Year of Publication Publication Type Title
2013 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Political Economy of Environmental Regulation and Performance: Some Empirical Results from SIDS”, Elsevier Procedia Economics and Finance, vol. 5, pp. 532 - 541, 2013.[Abstract]

Abstract This paper empirically examines environmental regulation politics in terms of proactive lobbying at different levels of public environmental management, namely enacting legislation and implementing policies. In the proposed models, effectiveness of environmental regulation is captured by (i) level of stringency of environmental regulations, (ii) degree of enforcement, and (iii) the achievement of various environmental performance goals. Findings from cross-country regressions support the capture theory where small size and greater availability of resources render industrial groups in \{SIDS\} powerful at the legislation level. Rent-seeking behaviour of industrial lobbies appears to be channeled via corrupt practices but is constrained by high dependence of \{SIDS\} on international trade as well as improved governance measures and better rule of law. No evidence is obtained on environmental legislative damage caused by agricultural lobbies and tourism sector. At the implementation level, both industry and agriculture are found to be pro-active in terms of non- compliance to environmental legislations causing significant damage to the environment. Weak agricultural lobbies at legislative level in \{SIDS\} may be due to extensive government support programs to agriculture, which would serve to dampen or nullify any increment in cost borne by farmers arising from stringent environmental regulations. The impact of tourism lobbies on environmental performance is inconclusive. Tourism lobbies in \{SIDS\} have interest in maintaining some level of environmental quality and do not display severe adverse impacts at the implementation phase even after controlling for their interaction with institutional variables (corruption, rule of law and government effectiveness).

More »»
2013 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Ethnic Diversity, Development and Social Policy in Small States”, UNRISD Research Paper (Geneva), vol. 2, 2013.[Abstract]

The present study critically examines social policy performance in Mauritius in terms of the quality of institutions, overall resources of the government, social welfare orientation of government budgets and ethnic balance in social policy formulation. The historical roots of colonization and political developments are analysed to assess their impacts on social policies. Part 2 of the study portrays the colonial history and politics, and part 3 describes post-independence political developments that have marked the economic and social trajectories. Part 4 depicts the social situation in terms of social indicators during different phases of development and economic transformation. Part 5 contains an assessment of the budgetary performance of social policy. Part 6 examines the institutional foundations to meet the social policy challenges. The discussion in this section is carried out in the light of the alternative strands of literature, namely participatory democracy, power of state jurisdiction and social cohesion. An analytical exercise is undertaken in part 7 to examine the welfare orientation of social policy with particular emphasis on budgetary efforts to catch up with other countries in the region. Part 8 summarizes the major findings and puts forward some guidelines for social policy reform in small states and a tentative agenda for future research directions.

More »»
2012 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Geography, Macroeconomic Vulnerability and Economic Performance”, International Journal of Development and Conflict, vol. 02, p. 1250006, 2012.[Abstract]

The objective of the paper is to empirically examine the effects of macroeconomic volatility on growth and other indicators of welfare incorporating more particularly geography produced diverse conditions that are either growth promoting or growth hampering. We extend the literature on macroeconomic volatility, growth and welfare by integrating the macroeconomics and new development economics literature on cross-country growth performance by capturing factors beyond neoclassical and new growth approaches. Empirical results confirm that growth outcomes under different geography-produced favorable and adverse conditions have the potential of minimizing and exacerbating the effects of macroeconomic variability. The significance of geography and its links with institutions is highlighted and adverse growth and welfare effects of income inequality, coastal openness and trade openness are analyzed.

More »»
2011 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Redistributive Impact of Increasing Block Residential Water Rates: Some Empirical Evidence from Mauritius”, Water Policy, vol. 13, pp. 471–489, 2011.[Abstract]

This paper presents empirical results on progressive incidence of water charges that contradict conventional wisdom in developing and many developed countries. Family size in Mauritius is larger among high-income categories relative to low-income groups. Because of this unusual demographic dimension, increasing block tariffs coupled with lifeline rates below long-term marginal costs applicable to low-volume users produce a different result. Regional disparities in water demand among residential users further contribute to a redistributive strategy. It is interesting to note that extensive metering in urban and rural areas allows low-income consumers to end up in low-rate blocks. Empirical estimates of price, income and household size elasticities for different income categories reveal that low-income households face more than average price elasticity of demand for water and less than average income and household size elasticity. In the light of these results, it has been established that increase in demand for water among richer households has the potential of improving equity in water charges. Computed marginal budget shares derived from a linear expenditure system show that the amount of supernumerary income would be higher for richer people, so that a percentage increase in income may result in higher level spending on water when compared to lower-income households. More »»
2011 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Fish Imports as an Environmental Policy”, Applied Economics Letters, vol. 18, pp. 859-864, 2011.[Abstract]

Although Total Allowable Catch (TAC) system has not been successful in management of fisheries, fish imports have shown features of an environmental-friendly policy. Imports emerge as a significant tool to improve fish productivity through biodiversity conservation and induce the use of less capital intensive technology. Conversely, TAC system harms biodiversity leading to increased capital effort and reduced catch levels. Another interesting finding is the existence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC)-type relationship between per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and fish catch. As development proceeds, propensity to import increases, having favourable impact on biodiversity through reduced fish production.

More »»
2009 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Policy and Non-policy Determinants of Progressivity of Block Residential Water Rates - A Case Study of Mauritius”, Applied Economics Letters , vol. 16, pp. 211-215, 2009.[Abstract]

This article presents empirical results on increasing block water rates that contradict conventional wisdom in developing countries and many developed countries. Unlike in other countries, family size in Mauritius increases with income. Due to this unusual demographic dimension, increasing block tariffs coupled with lifeline rates that are below long-run marginal cost applicable to low-volume users produce a different result. Regional variations in water demand and extensive metering both in rural and urban areas reinforce the redistributing nature of water charges. Traditional incidence analysis with adjustment for family size, linear expenditure systems approach and interactive demand models empirically support this result

More »»
2007 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo and NATH, S. H. Y. A. M., “Weak Agriculture-industry Linkages, International Political Economy and Labour Market Distortions: A Case study of Mauritius”, International Journal of Economic Research , vol. 4, pp. 179-199, 2007.
2007 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “International Trends in Water Utility Regimes”, Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, vol. 78, pp. 87–135, 2007.[Abstract]

This paper provides the taxonomy of country experiences in managing their water utilities. Institutions for water supply for various uses and their financial implications are analysed. Different episodes of governmental intervention in water supply and charging are examined. From the survey of different regimes and the existing literature, cost recovery and affordability emerge as the major building blocks for any reform of water utilities. Privatization of water services in terms of ownership change, public-private arrangements and international involvement seems to be a mixed blessing and donor assistance to water projects raises issues in international inequality and does not increase cost recovery levels. Cost recovery is positively associated with economic development, institutional quality and performance of water utilities.

More »»
2007 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Modeling the economic efficiency of irrigation water supply in dry and humid regions”, Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, vol. 19, pp. 103–122, 2007.[Abstract]

This paper tests the economic efficiency of irrigation water as supplied by single purpose and by general purpose public utilities in dry and humid regions, respectively, in terms of underprovision and overprovision. The proposed methodology mixes conceptual frameworks developed by Farrell (1957) and Brueckner (1979, 1982). A typical agricultural production function uses the institutional attributes of the water-providing authority as an argument. Both short-run and long-run estimates are provided. Although in both cases irrigation water is heavily subsidized, there is no evidence of systematic underprovision or overprovision for the dry north and west, under the single purpose Irrigation Authority. However, water is oversupplied to more humid areas by the general purpose Central Water Authority. Empirical estimates confirm that the efficiency of the single purpose Irrigation Authority cannot be attributed to irrigation technique. The general purpose Water Authority suffers from inefficiency in coordinating rainwater availability with the institutional water supply.

More »»
2007 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Estimating the Budgetary Impact of Higher Willingness to Pay for Residential Water Using CVM: A Case Study of Mauritius”, Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution, vol. 4, pp. 57–64, 2007.[Abstract]

The paper attempts to ascertain the feasibility of reducing potable water deficits by charging residential consumers higher prices. The Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) is used to find out whether an upward revision of residential water tariffs would be compatible with consumer preferences and hence also politically feasible. Survey techniques using dichotomous choice format questions have been employed to elicit respondents' willingness to pay (WTP) for improved water services. The bid variable is found to be statistically significant in both the bivariate and multivariate logit models. Moreover, mean and median WTP estimates generated from these models are found to be much higher than what would be required by the first best standard (long run marginal cost) and the second best (average cost). More »»
2004 Journal Article Yeti N. Madhoo, “Political Economy of Water Pricing Policy: Empirical Evidence from Public Utilities in Mauritius”, Water Resources Research, vol. 40, 2004.[Abstract]

This paper examines whether political economy considerations are important in the formulation of water pricing policy in Mauritius. Empirical models are developed incorporating current and lagged electoral years as dummy variables in order to test whether politicians make strategic use of water pricing policy to further their partisan electoral objectives. Political economy concerns are also included into our analysis by looking at the impact of lobby groups on the implementation of water prices. In the case of potable water prices, a disaggregated analysis according to consumer categories provides weak evidence of political manipulation. However, political manipulation is established in terms of subsidy allocations to the residential sector, which is the largest consumer category. As regards irrigation water, the results lend support to the contention that political parties indeed manipulate irrigation subsidies allocated to the Irrigation Authority. Evidence on the lobby effect emerges from our empirical analysis on potable water. More specifically, we find that smaller groups have successfully been able to use their political influence to obtain smaller water price increases.

More »»
Publication Type: Book
Year of Publication Publication Type Title
2010 Book Shyam Nath, John L. Robert, and Yeti N. Madhoo, Saving Small Island Developing States: Environmental and Natural Resource Challenges. Commonwealth Secretariat, 2010.[Abstract]

Small may be beautiful, but small island states have a big problem - the environmental consequences of climate change. Emanating from research at the University of Mauritius and with contributions from a wide range of experts, Saving Small Island States introduces and explains the key environmental policy challenges and suggested responses to them.

More »»

WORKING PAPERS (REFEREED)

  • Beneficiary charges: The Cinderella of sub-national finance (co-authored). International Center for Public PolicyWorking Paper 13-17, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, Atlanta (USA), May 2013, 1-41.
  • Explaining African economic growth performance: The case of Mauritius (co-authored). Growth Working Paper No.1, African Economic Research Consortium, PO Box 62882-00200 Nairobi (Kenya), 2004, 1-45.
     

REFEREE IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNALS

  • Referee for Applied Economics, Taylor and Francis, UK(since 2006)
     

INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANCIES

  • Explaining African Economic Growth Performance in Africa: Mauritius (27 Countries Project), The Case of Mauritius, African Economic Research Consortium, Nairobi (Africa), Funded by Multiple Donor Countries and International Funding Agencies, 2003-2006.
  • Saving Small Island Developing States: Environmental and Natural Resource Challenges, Commonwealth Secretariat, London (UK), 2008-2010
  • Social Policy Challenges in Small States, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, Geneva (Switzerland), 2009-2012
     

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE AND WORKSHOPS

  • Paper presentation and participation at the 61st Annual Conference of the North American Regional Science Conference, Washington DC (USA), November 12-15, 2014
  • Taylor & Francis Group Journals’ Editorial Roundtable 2014, The Author-Impact, Engagement and Social Media, Claridges Hotel, New Delhi,November 10, 2014
  • Paper presentation and participationat the International Conference on Applied Economics (ICOAE) 2013, held in Istanbul (Turkey), June 27-29, 2013
  • Paper presentation and participation at the 18thAnnual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC), University of Hull (UK), June 24-26, 2012
  • Book Launch Session on Saving Small Islands as part of Regional Technical Workshop ISIDSMS (Islands) organised by Indian Ocean Commission and European Union held at La Plantation Hotel, Balaclava (Mauritius), 24-27 January, 2012
  • Paper presentation and participation at the 17thAnnual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC), Earth Institute, Columbia University (New York, USA), May8-10, 2011
  • Paper presentation and participation at the 56th Annual Conference of North American Regional Science Association, San Francisco (California, USA), November 18-21, 2009
  • Attended the International Human Dimensions Programme (IHDP) 2nd Annual Science Policy Dialogue on Energy, Sustainability and Societal Change held at Santa Barbara, California (USA), 19-20 June 2008
  • Participated in United Nations University / World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU/WIDER) Conference on Country Role Models for Development Success, held at Marina Congress Center, Helsinki (Finland), 13-14 June, 2008
  • Participated in Workshop on integrating social and ecological data on a regional scale in the Western Indian Ocean organised by the ARC Centre of excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Australia) and the Coral Reef Conservation Project (Kenya), Mauritius, May 19 –23, 2008
  • Attended African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) Senior Policy Seminar X: Climate Change and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), April 7-9, 2008
  • Participated in Training Course on ‘Environmental/ Natural Resource Economics with focus on analyzing the economic costs of land degradation and the benefits of sustainable land management (SLM)’ organised by UNDP/GEF/GoM, held at Phoenix (Mauritius), 6-17 August 2007.
  • Participated in World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Climate Risk Conference, Espoo (Finland), July 17-21, 2006
  • Attended AERC Special Senior Policy Seminar on Explaining African Economic Growth Performance held at Kigali (Rwanda), October 24-25, 2006.
  • Paper presentation and participation at the 52nd Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, organised by Nevada State University in Las Vegas, Nevada (USA), November 10-12, 2005
  • Paper presentation and participation at the Indian Ocean Marine Environment Conference (IOMEC) organised by University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia), February 14-18, 2005.
  • Paper presentation and participation at the 51st Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, organised by University of Washington, Seattle (USA), November 11-13, 2004
  • Co-presentation with S. Nath ‘Explaining Mauritian Growth’, paper presented at the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) Workshop on Explaining African Economic Growth Performance, Nairobi (Kenya), May 22-24, 2003
  • Presented a paper on ‘Water pricing – Some efficiency and distributional issues’ at a seminar organised by the Economics Department, University of East Anglia (UK), November 1999
  • Attended several seminars held in the Economics Department at University of East Anglia (UK) in 1999 and at the University of Alberta (Canada) in 1998
  • Participated in a Workshop on ‘Life Cycle Assessment’ held at University of Mauritius (UOM), November 4-5, 2003
  • Participated in National Human Dimensions Programme (NHDP) Workshop, organised by the International Human Dimensions Programme (IHDP), held at UOM, March 25-27, 2002
  • Participated in Workshop on ‘Reducing Vulnerability to Weather and Climate Extremes’, organised by the Meteorological Services, held at Flic en Flaq, Mauritius on 23rd April 2002
  • Attended ‘Research Methodology Workshop for Social and Management Sciences’, UOM, Jul-Aug 2000
     

MEMBERSHIP OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

  • International Sustainable Development Research Society (ISDRS), UK; North American Regional Science Council (NARSC), USA; International Water Association (IWA), UK; Royal Economic Society, UK 
     

SUPERVISION OF UNDER-GRADUATE AND POST-GRADUATE DISSERTATIONS

  • Economics of Health, Environment and Energy, Economic Development
     

ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION

  • Member, Departmental Advisory Committee, African Economic Research Consortium (2007-08)
  • Member, Faculty Board, Social Science and Humanities, University of Mauritius (2006-08)
  • Editorial Assistant, Economics Working Paper Series (2005-08)
  • Member, University Website Committee (2007-08)
  • Coordinator, Department of Economics and Statistics Website (2005-07)
  • Member, University Students Orientation Committee (2007-08)
     
Faculty Details

Qualification:

Designation: 
Faculty Email: 
yetinishamadhoo@am.amrita.edu