Qualification: 
Ph.D
g_sangeetha@cb.amrita.edu

A gold medalist in her graduation and post graduation, she has received her doctoral degree from Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai. While her PhD research was related to reforms in State-Owned enterprises in India and she continues to actively work in this area, she has also interests in tourist research where she is looking at the intersection of social media, customer satisfaction and tourist destination India.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2019

Journal Article

Dr. Sangeetha G, “Does hotel attributes impact customer satisfaction: a sentiment analysis of online reviews”, Journal of Global Scholars of Marketing Science: Bridging Asia and The World, 2019.

2019

Journal Article

Dr. Sangeetha G, “Does Autonomy Matter in State Owned Enterprises? - Evidence from Performance Contracts in India”, The Economics of Transition, 2019.[Abstract]


The empirical effect of enterprise autonomy on the performance of state-owned enterprises is surprisingly scant despite autonomy being a preferred reform instrument in many countries, and often chosen over privatization. Using longitudinal data on performance contracts for state-owned enterprises in India, this paper empirically examines whether granting increased autonomy to state-owned enterprises through such contracts positively impacts enterprise profitability. Further, using the unique reform experience of India as a natural experiment, whereby enterprise autonomy has been simultaneously pursued with partial privatization for a sub-set of enterprises, a unique contribution of the study lies in investigating whether ownership divestiture through partial privatization has any effect once enterprises are imparted managerial autonomy, or whether ownership per se matters. Classifying state owned enterprises into three types, namely those that have been granted autonomy, those with autonomy and partially divested ownership, and those with neither, the study finds robust evidence of a positive impact of managerial autonomy on enterprise profitability. Additionally, once autonomy is controlled for, the study finds at best a weak effect of partial privatization. These results raise doubt on earlier findings of a robust positive effect of partial privatization in India in studies that did not explicitly control for enterprise autonomy thereby raising the possibility that the positive privatization effect that showed up was in actuality, an autonomy effect.

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2018

Journal Article

V. Govindasamy, Dr. Kalyani Suresh, and Dr. Sangeetha G, “Textile Industry CSR Disclosure Trends : Reflections from India and Malaysia”, Prabandhan: Indian Journal of Management, vol. 11, no. 12, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper examined the Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures of South Indian and Malaysian textile firms to understand the levels of transparency in terms of a comparison between the companies' strategic implementation of CSR vs their efforts towards public perception of their CSR efforts. Paired t - test and binary regression were used to measure CSR Disclosure Indexes within the textile firms, culled from their corporate website communications and annual reports. It was found that CSR disclosure practices varied significantly across strategic implementation and perceived CSR practices for both the countries, with higher levels of perceived CSR. Presently, textile firms in both countries do not seem to provide an accurate image of CSR actions and initiatives. The study is a valuable contribution to academic literature as well as textile firms and stakeholders in making the heterogeneous strategic - perceived CSR link more relevant and transparent, and thus, furthering knowledge on the relationship between CSR reporting and implementation. The study also filled the gap in academic literature in terms of highlighting a model of CSR disclosures that would enable a cross - country study of the dynamics of firms' CSR approach in terms of transparency and value - enhancement of CSR activities.

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Sangeetha G, Patri, R., and Narayanan, B., “International Tourist Arrival in India: Impact of Mumbai 26/11 Terror Attack”, Foreign Trade Review, vol. 53, pp. 12-28, 2018.[Abstract]


India experienced terror attack on its financial and entertainment capital Mumbai on 26 November 2008. There were 12 coordinated shooting and bombing attacks which lasted four days, killing 164 and injuring several hundred (Press Information Bureau, 2008, HM announces measured to enhance security, New Delhi: Ministry of Home Affairs, GOI.). The attack was largely targeted towards international tourists visiting Mumbai at the hotels like Oberoi Trident, The Taj Mahal Palace and Tower and Leopard Café. The objective of this article is to study the impact of the 26/11 terror attack on the arrival of international tourists in India. Very few studies in the literature have examined the impact of terrorist attacks on the tourism industry. (For more recent work see Arana & Leon, 2008, Annals of Tourism Research, 35, 299–315; Raza & Jawaid, 2013, Economic Modelling, 33, 65–70.) Our article tries to add evidence to this growing literature. Further in analyzing tourist demand, several researchers (see Song et al., 2012 for a review) have studied the relationship between tourism and economic growth. While studies have found unidirectional relationship between international tourism and economic growth (e.g., Balaguer & Cantavella-Jorda, 2002; Oh, 2005), there are others who find evidence supporting bidirectional relationship (e.g., Dritsakis, 2004; Kim & Chen, 2006, Tourism Management, 27, 925–933). In our study, we assume a bidirectional relationship between foreign tourists arriving in India and its economic condition. In the present study, we analyze the impact of 26/11 terror attack at Mumbai on the international tourist arrival in India. The analysis is done using the vector autoregression (VAR) model, where the foreign tourists arriving in India is a function of economic condition prevailing in the country, captured here by real gross domestic product of India and the terror attack dummy variable. Our results indicate that post 26/11 there has been a significant decline in the number of foreign tourists arriving in India. We further analyze the disaggregated airport level data, where similar significant negative impact were found for Mumbai and Delhi airports.JEL: L83, Z32, Z38

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Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2011

Book Chapter

D. N. Gujarati, Porter, D. C., and Dr. Sangeetha G, “Basic of Econometrics”, Special Indian Edition (Fifth Edition)., Tata McGraw-Hill, 2011.

2010

Book Chapter

R. Mitra, Damodharan, S., and Dr. Sangeetha G, “Jharkhand State- A Profile”, in Backwaters of Development- Six Deprived States of India, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010.

2007

Book Chapter

D. N. Gujarati and Dr. Sangeetha G, “Basic of Econometrics”, Special Indian Edition (Fourth Edition), ., Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, 2007.