Qualification: 
Ph.D
r_murali@cb.amrita.edu

Dr. Murali Rangarajan joined Amrita in December 2007 after completing his Ph. D. in Chemical Engineering from University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. He obtained his Bachelor's degree in Chemical and Electrochemical Engineering in 1997 from Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI), India. He obtained his Master's degree in Chemical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India in 1999. Before joining Amrita, he worked as Adjunct Assistant Professor at Santa Fe College, Gainesville, FL in 2005-06 and as Visiting Research Scholar (Post-Doc) at Clean Energy Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL in 2006-07.

Affiliations

Qualifications

YEAR DEGREE/PROGRAM INSTITUTION
2006 Visiting Research Scholar Clean Energy Research Center, University of South Florida
2006 PhD in Chemical Engineering University of Florida
1999 M. Tech. in Chemical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
1997 B. Tech. in Chemical & Electrochemical Engineering Central Electrochemical Research Institute Karaikudi

Certificates, Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Member, Board of Studies (Chemical Engineering), KPR Institute of Engineering and Technology, 2019 – present
  • Research Excellence Award by Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, 2018
  • Awarded the prestigious (>100 year-old) award Bharatam for contributions to the ancient temple theater art “Bhagavata Mela”, 2018
  • Member, Board of Studies (Chemical Engineering), Amrita Vishwa Vidaypeetham, 2014 – present
  • Member, Board of Studies (Chemical Engineering), Adhiyamaan College of Engineering (Autonomous), 2011 – 2014
  • Member, Board of Studies (Materials Science and Engineering), Amrita Vishwa Vidaypeetham, 2010 – present
  • Member, Tau Beta Pi, The Engineering Honor Society, 2000
  • University of Florida Alumni Graduate Fellow, 1999-2004
  • Life Member, Indian Society of Electroanalytical Chemistry (ISEAC)
  • Life Member, Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers (IIChE)
  • Life Member, Indian Institute of Metals (IIM)
  • Life Member, Indian Society for Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering (ISAMPE)

Research

Areas of Interest

  • Water: Real-Time Detection and Degradation of Pollutants – Heavy Metals, Pesticides; Cyberphysical Systems for Sustainable Water Management
  • Soil: Real-Time Detection of Soil Quality, Precision Agriculture
  • Electrochemistry: Electrodeposition, Electrochemical Surface Modification, Electrochemical Sensors
  • Nanomaterials: Carbon, Fibers, and Particles – Sensors and Catalysis
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Signal and Image Processing in IoT-based Real-Time Technologies
  • Low-Cost Nutritive Food Formulations

Summary

My group’s research activities have been aimed at:

  • Developing functional materials and coatings, and,
  • Developing feasible, affordable and real-time technologies for water distribution and quality management.

We work with multi-disciplinary teams in developing sustainable technologies and solutions for global challenges. We work both on fundamental and highly applied research, and the problems we work on are diverse. Some of our past and current research activities include:

  1. Electrodeposition of Metals, Alloys and Compounds: We use electrodeposition as a synthesis strategy to developed controlled morphologies and compositions of thin films of metals, alloys and compounds.

    We have studied electrodeposition of bismuth from acidic baths and deposited different morphologies of bismuth films by choice of bath composition (including additives), pH and deposition conditions. We have electrodeposited SnBi and SnIn alloys from acidic baths for microelectronic packaging and have shown that it is possible to deposit alloys of a wide range of compositions (e.g., 14% to 75% Sn, including eutectic alloys) with smooth morphologies and good surface coverage. We are working on developing the flip-chip technologies for indium, tin-bismuth and tin-indium alloys. We have shown, for the first time, that it is possible to electrodeposit bismuth iodide and oxyiodide thin films of controlled stoichiometries from a single bath.

    Ongoing research. Presently, we are interested in understanding the synthesis-structure and structure-property relationships in electrodeposition of metals, alloys and compounds. We seek collaborations in modeling and simulation of electrodeposition of bismuth, tin-bismuth alloy and bismuth iodide from different baths, particularly the nucleation and crystal growth phenomena.

  2. Electrochemical Sensors. We have developed bismuth-based and graphene-based electrochemical sensors for the detection of various analytes including heavy metals (particularly lead ions) in water, biomolecules in urine and serum matrices (dopamine, uric acid and ascorbic acid, collaboration with Dr. Nikhil KothurkarCEMS), antioxidants and nutrients in food matrices (ascorbic acid, folic acid, ferulic acid, vanillin), and macronutrients (NPK) in soils (collaboration with Dr. A. PurushothamanElectronics and Communication Engineering). Towards understanding and designing graphene-based sensors, we have employed semi-empirical simulations of graphene oxide-analyte interactions.

    Ongoing research. We are interested in developing real-time electrochemical sensors for detection of heavy metal ions and macronutrients (NPK) in water and soil. To this end, the sensor technology is being standardized and collaboratively, we are developing portable potentiostat and the required instrumentation. We have initiated studies of degradation of screen-printed electrode materials in water and soil matrices. We seek collaborations on systems-level simulations of sensor networks employing such devices.

  3. Water Distribution and Quality Management. We are developing feasible, affordable and versatile technology solutions for real-time management of water distribution and quality. In an ongoing study, we are examining how to minimize the number and optimize the placement of water flow/pressure sensors in large water distribution networks for real-time localization and detection of leaks in the networks. This is a collaboration with Dr. Vidhya Balasubramanian (Computer Science and Engineering). We are developing packed bed electrochemical reactors for removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this system, we are also exploring the simultaneous production of hydrogen by water electrolysis. We are also developing filters for heavy metal ions using cementitious materials (collaboration with Dr. Manu Santhanam and Dr. Mathava Kumar of IIT Madras). We are designing and developing continuous reactors for electrocoagulation- and advanced oxidation-based removal of various pollutants from water including pesticides and dyes.

Keywords

  • Electrodeposition
  • Bismuth
  • Tin-Bismuth Alloys
  • Bismuth Iodide
  • Bismuth Oxyiodide
  • Heavy Metal Sensing (Water)
  • NPK Sensing (Soil)
  • Packed Bed Electrochemical Reactor
  • Pervious Concrete-based Water Filters
  • Graphene-based Electrochemical Sensors

Research Group

Dr. Murali Rangarajan

Principal Investigator
r_murali@cb.amrita.edu
Functional Materials and Coatings, Electrodeposition, Electrochemical Sensors, Water and Soil Quality Sensing, Water Distribution, Water Quality Management

Vinoj Vasu

Ph. D. Scholar
v_vinoj@cb.amrita.edu
Semi-empirical Simulations of Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors


 

Vijitha S. Nair

Ph. D. Scholar
sn_vijitha@cb.amrita.edu
Hydrothermal Synthesis of Perovskite Mixed Metal Oxides



 

S. Prem Anandh

Ph. D. Scholar
s_premanandh@cb.amrita.edu
Graphene and Metal Oxide Thin Films for Corrosion Protection
 

G. Mohan Kumar

Ph. D. Scholar
g_mohankumar@cb.amrita.edu
Electrodeposition of Bismuth, Bismuth Iodides and Oxyiodides

Krishnan C. R.

Ph. D. Scholar
cr_krishnan@cb.amrita.edu
Pervious Concrete Filters for Heavy Metals Removal from Water

Past Members

Dr. Kadarkarai Govindan
(National Post-Doctoral Fellow)

Core Research Fellow,
Sungkyun-kwan University, South Korea

govindanmu@gmail.com
Electro coagulation and Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment – Dyes and Pesticides

Dr. A. R. Rajamani
(Ph. D. Scholar)

 

Post- Doctoral Research Associate,
University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada

manianraja5k@gmail.com
Electrodeposition of Bismuth and Tin-Bismuth Alloys
 

Funded Projects

Years Sponsor Title of Project Amount of Grant (Rs.) Investigators Status
2011 - 2014 DRDO Electrochemically Tailored Compliant Solder Materials for Flip-Chip Joining 62,48,000 Dr. Murali Rangarajan (PI), Dr. Krishnashree Achuthan (Co-PI), Dr. T. Ramachandran (co-PI) Completed
2013 - 2015 MHRD/IIT Kharagpur National Pedagogy Project: Principal Developer for the Course Chemical Systems Modeling 5,00,000 Dr. Murali Rangarajan, Dr. Udaya Bhaskar Reddy Ragula Completed
2015 - 2018 DST (Indo-Norway ENERGIX Scheme) Photo-electrochemical Splitting of Water with N-doped Graphene-Hematite Composites for Hydrogen Production (PhotoNGrapHy) Indian Side: 25,88,000 Norwegian Side: 2.4 Million NOK Indian Team: Dr. Thirugnasambandam Manivasagam (PI), Dr. Murali Rangarajan (Co-PI), Dr. D. Kumaresan (Co-PI), Prof. Peter Notten (Co-PI) Norway Team: Dr. Kaushik Jayasayee (PI), Dr. Jonathan Polfus (Co-PI), Sidsel Meli Hanetho (Co-PI), Silje Fosse Hakonsen (Co-PI), Ann Mari Svenson (Co-PI) Completed
2015 - 2016 ICSSR Corrosion Auditing in Oil and Gas Transmission Pipelines in India 4,00,000 Dr. Bhaskaran Rajan (LPU; PI), Dr. Murali Rangarajan (CI), Mr. Lalit Bhalla (LPU; CI), Mr. Vishal Sarin (LPU; CI) Completed
2016 –2018 SERB-NPDF Iron Oxide Nanostructures from Anodic Dissolution for Electro-Fenton-mediated Oxidative Degradation of Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) 19,20,000 Dr. Kadarkkarai Govindan (PDF), Dr. Murali Rangarajan (Mentor) Completed
2018 - 2021 SERB-EMR Development of a Pulsed Flow Packed Bed Electrochemical Reactor for Heavy Metals Removal from Groundwater and Wastewater 37,24,600 Dr. Murali Rangarajan (PI), Dr. Thirugnasambandam Manivasagam (CI), Dr. Mahendra Natkuji Nandanwar (CI) Ongoing
2019 (expected to begin by December 2019) DST-ICPS A Modular Cyberphysical System for Sustainable Water Management 40,00,000 Dr.Vidhya Balasubramanian (PI), Dr. K. K. Sasi (CI), Dr. Dhanesh Kurup (CI), Dr. Murali Rangarajan (CI) Selected
2017 –2021 Australian Mines Company Ltd. Fluorite-structured Metal Hydrides: A New Class of High-capacity MgScX Ternary Alloys for Next Generation NiMH Batteries and Stationary Hydrogen Storage Applications USD 240,000 Dr. Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam (PI), Dr. Peter Notten (TU Eindhoven, Forschungzentrum Juelich, Amrita – PI), Dr. Murali Rangarajan (CI), Dr. Udaya Bhaskar Reddy Ragula (CI) Ongoing
2019 SERB-CRG Miniaturized On-Chip Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Soil Moisture, pH, Temperature, Conductivity and Macronutrients 48,98,000 Dr. A. Purushothaman (PI), Dr. Murali Rangarajan (CI) Under Review

Teaching

UG Theory Courses

  • Linear Algebra for Chemical Engineers (19MAT103)
  • Vector Calculus and Ordinary Differential Equations (15MAT121)
  • Chemical Process Principles (ChE210)
  • Introduction to Thermodynamics (ME 110)
  • Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (ChE212)
  • Mass Transfer Operations II (CM304)
  • Computational Techniques in Chemical Engineering (ChE313)
  • Chemical Process Modeling and Simulation (CL603 and CM441)

PG/PhD Theory Courses

  • Advanced Process Modeling (CL603)
  • Computer-Aided Simulation of Process Plants (CL613/614)
  • Thermodynamics of Multiphase Equilibria (CL611)
  • Mathematical Methods in Materials Science (MA601)
  • Materials Thermodynamics (MS603)
  • Electronic Materials Science (MS604)
  • Electrochemistry and Corrosion (MS602)
  • Electroanalytical Techniques (SS829)
  • Metabolism of Nutrients (SS844)
  • Condensed Matter Physics (SS833)

UG Labs

  • Chemical Process Simulation Lab using MATLAB (CM491)
  • Computer-Aided Design of Chemical Processes using ASPEN (CM493)
  • Chemical Process Control Laboratory (CM394)
  • Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab (ChE393)
  • Engineering Drawing II (CAD/CAM, ME 182)
  • Engineering Drawing I (ME181)

PG Labs

  • Materials Synthesis and Characterization Lab (MS621 and MS622)

UG – Professional Development Courses

  • Seminar (ChE397)
  • Amrita Values Program I (AVP201)
  • Amrita Values Program II (AVP 211)

Publications

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Title

2019

Vinoj Vasu and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Semi-Empirical Simulations of Graphene Oxide and Bisphenol A”, International Conference on Multifunctional and Hybrid materials for Chemical process, Energy, Environment and medical applications (ICMHCEE 2019). NIT Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu., 2019.

2018

Vinoj Vasu and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Semi-Empirical Simulations of Base functionalized Graphene Oxide and Bisphenol A”, 2nd International Conference on Recent Trends in Analytical Chemistry (ICORTAC-2018), University of Madras, Chennai. University of Madras, Chennai., 2018.

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Title

2019

Vinoj Vasu and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Semi-empirical simulations of interactions between edge-functionalized graphene oxide and bisphenol A”, Materials Today: Proceedings , 2019.

2019

M. Sunitha, Sathish, A., ,, and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Ni-Zn-P catalyst supported on stainless steel gauze for enhanced electrochemical oxidation of methanol for direct methanol fuel cell application”, Materials Research Express, vol. 6, 2019.[Abstract]


Ni-Zn-P catalyst of different chemical compositions is successfully synthesized via simple electroless deposition method on stainless steel (SS) gauze substrate. The electrocatalytic properties of Ni-Zn-P/SS gauze is investigated towards methanol oxidation in an alkaline medium. The Ni80Zn12P8 catalyst coated on SS gauze exhibits higher and more durable electrocatalytic activities with an excellent current density (10.2 mA cm-2) at a negative potential (-0.6 V). The modified electrode is characterized by SEM, and EDX techniques to determine the surface morphology and composition of the catalyst deposited. XRD confirms the presence of hexagonal Ni2P, tetragonal Zn3P2, and cubic Ni-P structure. The surface properties investigated using XPS analysis indicate the presence of the nickel phosphide and zinc phosphide linkage. The BET surface area for Ni80Zn12P8 catalyst coated SS gauze is 6.661 m2g-1. The current density and power density obtained from single fuel cell performance on Ni80Zn12P8/SS electrode for 1 M methanol are 0.107 mA cm-2 and 9.5 mW cm-2, respectively. © 2019 IOP Publishing Ltd.

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2019

M. Muthu, K. Ramakrishnan, C., Santhanam, M., Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Kumar, M., “Heavy Metal Removal and Leaching from Pervious Concrete Filter: Influence of Operating Water Head and Reduced Graphene Oxide Addition”, Journal of Environmental Engineering (United States), vol. 145, 2019.[Abstract]


The effects of an operating water head (OWH) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) addition on the pervious concrete filter (PCF) and heavy metals interaction were investigated in the present study. Five simulated wastewaters containing Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, and these four ions mixed together were filtered by PCF monoliths, considering the influence of three OWHs, viz. 30 cm, 7.5 cm, and trickling water head. The metal ions fixation degree increased with decreasing levels of OWH, which indicates that empty bed contact time influences PCF performance. Additionally, heavy metals removal and leaching from 0.06 wt% RGO modified PCF (G-PCF) and plain PCF were examined by first passing the five wastewater samples, immediately followed with strong acidic water, while maintaining the same flow and time. As a consequence of acid water passage, the fixated ions were seen to leach out from PCFs, but the RGO's strong reinforcement substantially reduced such leaching degree and additionally improved the simultaneous removal of four heavy metals. Although the estimated cost of G-PCF was relatively higher than plain PCF, both these filters appear highly efficient and inexpensive, unlike treatment units that are currently used by the electroplating industry for heavy metals removal. © 2019 American Society of Civil Engineers.

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2018

R. Shanmugam, Johny, J., Senthilkumar, R., Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Kothurkar, N., “One-Step RF-CVD Method for the Synthesis of Graphene Decorated with Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles”, Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, vol. 18, pp. 1089-1096, 2018.[Abstract]


Bilayer and few layer-graphene (Gr) with noble metal (Ag and Au) and TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using atmospheric pressure radio frequency chemical vapor deposition (APRF-CVD). The precursors for the formation of the respective nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and injected into the APRF-CVD containing a Cu foil catalyst at 1000 C. The graphene obtained had a blistered morphology similar to bubble-wrap. The bubble-like protrusions on the graphene sheet were caused by large nanoparticle clusters (~220 nm) formed below the graphene sheets. Smaller nanoparticles (10–80 nm) were also observed on top of the graphene sheets. Encapsulation of the nanoparticles with graphene, toDelivered yield core-shell particles was observed. Similarly, secondary growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the Tue, Au nanoparticles was observed. The average full width half maxima (FWHM) of 2D bands American in the Raman Scientific spectra Publishers indicate that the graphene formed was predominantly bilayer graphene for Gr-TiO2 (55 ± 1.72 cm⁻¹, and few-layer graphene for Gr-Ag (76 ± 22 cm⁻¹ and Gr-Au (88 ± 4.7 cm⁻¹. Raman spectroscopy also showed evidence for the doping of graphene and surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity (SERS) in the materials. These electronic properties of graphene with nanoparticles are relevant to various applications such as optoelectronics, catalysis, chemical and biological sensing.

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2018

P. A. Senthilvasan and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Corrosion protection of mild steel by graphene-based films”, Materials Research Express, vol. 5, 2018.[Abstract]


We explore the ability of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and titanium dioxide-decorated RGO (RGO-TiO2) films to protect mild steel from corrosion in 3.5% NaCl. Graphene oxide (GO), prepared using a Modified Hummers method, was reduced using sodium borohydride. TiO2 nanostructures were generated on RGO in a dispersion. The synthesized materials were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained results confirm the exfoliation of graphite, reduction of graphene oxide, and formation of predominantly anatase phase of TiO2, grown as nanotubes. Corrosion behaviour of mild steel, with coatings of GO, RGO and RGO-TiO2, was studied using Tafel polarization studies and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Tafel results showed that GO, RGO and RGO-TiO2 shifted the corrosion potential anodically, indicating that they prevent the anodic dissolution of iron. A six order-of-magnitude reduction in the corrosion current was observed with GO-film-coated mild steel coupons, with further reduction resulting in the use of RGO and RGO-TiO2 composite films. Impedance analysis showed that the films exhibited significantly enhanced charge transfer resistance for corrosion of mild steel by more than an order of magnitude compared to uncoated mild steel. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

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2018

K. Govindan, Angelin, A., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Critical evaluation of mechanism responsible for biomass abatement during electrochemical coagulation (EC) process: A critical review.”, J Environ Manage, vol. 227, pp. 335-353, 2018.[Abstract]


This is a first review paper that delineates fundamental disinfection mechanism undergoes during the simple electrochemical coagulation (EC) process. The elucidation of detailed mechanistic phenomenon of EC process involved would help to enhance the disinfection efficiency. In this context, the biomass (bacteria, virus and algae) abatement mechanism by EC is critically reviewed and rationalized based on the experimental demonstration performed from the recent decade. Whereas, the effect of most significant abiotic operating parameters, dissolved contents and bacteria cell wall composition on biomass reduction are explored in detail. From these analyses, physical removal and chemical inactivation routes are identified for bacteria abatement mechanism during the EC process using sacrificial electrodes. Which includes (i) enmeshment of microbial contaminants by EC flocs, (ii) sweeping flocculation is preferentially for destabilization of negatively charged biomass, and (iii) inactivation/attenuation of micro-organism cell walls by electrochemically induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) or direct interaction of electric field. Perhaps, the overall abatement mechanism attributes due to the aforementioned phenomenon endures independently and/or synergistically during the EC process. Nonetheless, to obtain better understanding of virus and algae abatement mechanism, we require more experimental investigation on algae and virus removal. Eventually, more intensive research efforts on biomass attenuation by EC are most important to reinforce this claim.

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2018

A. R. Rajamani, Jothi, S., Datta, M., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electrodeposition of tin-bismuth alloys: Additives, morphologies and compositions”, Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 165, pp. D50-D57, 2018.[Abstract]


Electrodeposition of tin-bismuth alloys on polycrystalline copper electrodes has been studied from an acidic bath comprising SnCl4, Bi(NO3)3, citric acid, poly(vinyl alcohol) and betaine. Using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and chronoamperometry (CA), co-deposition of tin and bismuth from the above bath has been examined. Bismuth (III) ions get reduced in a single-step, threeelectron- transfer reaction while tin (IV) ions undergo a two-step reduction through the formation of tin (II) ions. Nitric acid in the bath not only enhances solubility of the precursors but also decreases the peak potential separation between bismuth (III) and tin (II) ions. Through the introduction of various additives and variation in bath pH, co-deposition is preserved while the composition of tin in the obtained alloy is modified. The morphologies, composition and crystallinity of the deposits have been determined using scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. A wide range of alloy compositions (from 14% to 75% tin), including the eutectic Sn-Bi alloy have been deposited. Novel morphologies such as yarns-of-spool have been obtained. © 2018 The Electrochemical Society.

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2018

M. P. Kumar, Mini, K. M., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Ultrafine GGBS and calcium nitrate as concrete admixtures for improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance”, Construction and Building Materials, vol. 182, pp. 249-257, 2018.[Abstract]


This work reports the modification of ordinary Portland cement with ultrafine ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) as a mineral admixture and calcium nitrate as a chemical admixture and examines how mechanical and corrosion properties are improved by this modification. Ultrafine GGBS with average particle size of 4–6 μM was introduced as a replacement mineral admixture (10%) to ordinary Portland cement while calcium nitrate was introduced as a chemical admixture at 2% amount of cementitious material, in the preparation of concrete. X-ray diffraction studies on powdered concrete showed that the amount of silica in the concrete increases with the introduction of GGBS. Calcium hydroxide was converted to calcium silicates. Ultrafine GGBS reduced the workability and water absorption and increased the compressive strength of the concrete (18%) and the bond strength of the steel rebar (45%). Adding calcium nitrate further reduced water absorption of the concrete but improved workability, compressive strength (32%) and bond strength (131%). The pH of the concrete powdered solution became more alkaline with the replacement of ultrafine GGBS and addition of calcium nitrate. Free chloride content dropped by 39% and 65%, respectively, with the introduction of GGBS and nitrate. Corrosion behaviour of the concrete specimens were studied using measurement of open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance and Tafel polarization in an accelerated corrosion medium of 3.5% NaCl and 1 M sulphuric acid. Corrosion potential and current of the control specimens decreased with time for 40 days after which an increase was observed. Ultrafine GGBS shifted the corrosion potential in the cathodic direction, indicating retardation of the cathodic reaction (ex. oxygen reduction). Calcium nitrate, on the other hand, shifted the corrosion potential anodically by promoting the formation of a passive film of iron(III) hydroxide on the steel surface. Corrosion currents in GGBS and nitrate-modified concrete decreased by 200-fold compared to the control specimen on the first day, and by 480-fold on the 50th day (150-times smaller than the specimen modified with GGBS alone). Finally, scanning electron microscopy images of the corroded rebar at the end of 50th day indicate that pitting and intergranular corrosion occurs, with its extent reduced significantly by the introduction of admixtures. These results demonstrate that ultrafine GGBS and calcium nitrate as admixtures enhance the mechanical properties of concrete and reduce the corrosion of rebar. © 2018

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2018

S. Ramakrishnan, Jelmy, E. J., Senthilkumar, R., Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Kothurkar, N. K., “One-Step RF-CVD Method for the Synthesis of Graphene Decorated with Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles.”, J Nanosci Nanotechnol, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 1089-1096, 2018.[Abstract]


<p>Bilayer and few layer-graphene (Gr) with noble metal (Ag and Au) and TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using atmospheric pressure radio frequency chemical vapor deposition (APRF-CVD). The precursors for the formation of the respective nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and injected into the APRF-CVD containing a Cu foil catalyst at 1000 °C. The graphene obtained had a blistered morphology similar to bubble-wrap. The bubble-like protrusions on the graphene sheet were caused by large nanoparticle clusters (~220 nm) formed below the graphene sheets. Smaller nanoparticles (10-80 nm) were also observed on top of the graphene sheets. Encapsulation of the nanoparticles with graphene, to yield core-shell particles was observed. Similarly, secondary growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the Au nanoparticles was observed. The average full width half maxima (FWHM) of 2D bands in the Raman spectra indicate that the graphene formed was predominantly bilayer graphene for Gr-TiO2 (55 ± 1.72 cm-1), and few-layer graphene for Gr-Ag (76 ± 22 cm-1) and Gr-Au (88 ± 4.7 cm-1). Raman spectroscopy also showed evidence for the doping of graphene and surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity (SERS) in the materials. These electronic properties of graphene with nanoparticles are relevant to various applications such as optoelectronics, catalysis, chemical and biological sensing.</p>

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2017

Dr. Rajathilagam B. and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Reducing the cold-user and cold-item problem in recommender system by reducing the Spectral representation of principal components in signals and images using G-lets decomposition of sub bands”, IEEE Region 10 Annual International Conference, Proceedings TENCON, pp. 3809 -3812., 2017.

2017

Dr. Rajathilagam B. and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Edge detection using G-lets based on matrix factorization by group representations”, Pattern Recognition, vol. 67, pp. 1-15, 2017.[Abstract]


A new edge detection technique using transformation groups based G-lets filters is proposed in this paper. Discretizing gradients seem to produce discontinuity in classic edge detectors. No particular filter is capable of identifying meaningful edges at all scales and it increases computations with a multiscale approach. It is a challenge to get localized edges without spurious ones due to noise and integrate the obtained edges into meaningful object boundaries. Without breaking edge continuity and strictly localizing edges requires that filters do not blur the image during preprocessing. G-lets filters are found to be capable of performing well in most type of images including natural, noisy, low resolution and synthetic. In this paper, an edge detection algorithm using G-lets filters which are built by direct factorization of linear transformation matrices using irreducible representations is proposed. A multiresolution approach is shown to enhance the possibility of detecting faint edges. An edge tracing algorithm is presented to produce the edge image. The computational cost involved is comparatively lesser than existing filters. It is found that the geometries in the original image are preserved in the edge image. The edge tracing algorithm is capable of constructing object boundaries without the inner textures in a way that is not completely dependent on intensity thresholding. G-lets filters and the edge operator is found to be a promising algorithm for drastically bringing down the computations needed for realtime applications. The results are compared with BSDS500 boundary detection dataset using pb and global pb detectors. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.

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2017

K. Govindan, Chandran, H. T., Raja, M., Maheswari, S. U., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electron scavenger-assisted photocatalytic degradation of amido black 10B dye with Mn3O4 nanotubes: A response surface methodology study with central composite design”, Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, vol. 341, pp. 146-156, 2017.[Abstract]


In this present work, visible-light-sensitive Mn3O4 photocatalyst has been synthesized using a simple hydrothermal route and the photocatalyst has been characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis DRS and SEM-EDX techniques. These studies show the formation of Mn3O4 nanotubes assembled into fused rod-like structures with good crystallinity and an optical bandgap of 1.81 eV. The photocatalytic performance of Mn3O4 in the absence and presence of electron scavenger (ES) such as peroxomonosulfate (PMS), peroxodisulfate (PDS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) has also been analyzed in detail. The results reveal that merely 25% photodegradation efficiency is achieved by Mn3O4 photocatalysis. However, the photodegradation efficiency is significantly amplified up to 80% by Mn3O4 photocatalysis in the presence of PDS as an ES. Mn3O4 with PDS exhibits higher photodegradation efficiency than PMS and HP. The possible mechanisms of dye degradation by the photocatalyst in the absence and presence of electron scavengers and the significance of the obtained results are discussed. To identify the effects of experimental factors involved in photocatalytic degradation of amido black 10B dye, a response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) has been employed. The factors that most significantly affect the degradation process are identified as the choice of electron scavenger, amount of photocatalyst added, and the irradiation time. A quadratic model has been developed based on the RSM analysis and has been found effective in predicting the degradation performance. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

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2015

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, Rajamani, A. R., S., P. Anandh, Nair, V. S., and Vasu, V., “Electrodeposition of Eutectic Tin-Bismuth Alloys: Mechanism and Evolution of Morphology (Under Review)”, Journal of Applied Electrochemistry , 2015.

2015

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, Jelmy, E. J., S. Raj, M., Rajamani, A. R., Kothurkar, N., and Dr. Duraisamy Kumaresan, “Highly Solution Processable Camphor Sulfonic Acid-Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube/Polyaniline Composite and Its Uses in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (Under Review)”, Journal of Polymer Science B: Polymer Physics, 2015.

2015

M. Nithya, Dr. Murali Rangarajan, S. Anandh, P., Devi, T., and Rani, P. R. Janci, “Reduced Graphene Oxide-based Electrochemical Sensor for Vitamin C (Under Review)”, Analytica Chimica Acta , 2015.

2015

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, M, D. Kumar, Rajamani, A. R., and Srikaanth, S., “Electrodeposition of Bismuth on Polycrystalline Copper (Accepted)”, Frontiers of Materials Science , 2015.

2015

Vikram S, M, D., R, V., R, R. A., Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Tsuzuki, T., “Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Co-precipitation: Composition, Size, and Magnetization”, Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, vol. 15(6), pp. 3870-3878, 2015.

2015

A. R. Rajamani, R., K., Krishnan, S., Ramakrishnan, S., Raj, S. M., Kumaresan, D., Kothurkar, N., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electrochemical sensing of dopamine, uric acid and ascorbic acid using tRGO-TiO2 nanocomposites”, Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, vol. 15, pp. 5042-5047, 2015.[Abstract]


This work reports a graphene-based nonenzymatic electrochemical sensing platform for the detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA), and ascorbic acid (AA). Graphene oxide, synthesized by modified Hummers method, was thermally reduced in an induction furnace at 200 °C in an Ar-H2 atmosphere to obtain thermally reduced graphene oxide (tRGO). Nanocomposites of tRGO-TiO2 were obtained by a hydrothermal method, and were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FTIR spectra showed Ti-O-C peaks, indicating covalent linkage between the TiO2 nanoparticles and the reduced graphene oxide sheets. Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with the nanocomposite (tRGO-TiO2-GCE), and the modified electrode could detect dopamine (DA: 1 to 1000 μM), uric acid (UA: 1 to 900 μM), and ascorbic acid (AA: 10 to 1000 μM) in each other's presence over wide ranges, with adequate separation in peak potentials. Differential pulse voltammetry experiments yielded linear responses with sensitivities of 133.18, 33.96, and 155.59 μA mM-1 cm-2 for DA, UA, and AA, respectively.

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2013

E. J. Jelmy, Ramakrishnan, S., Dr. Sriram Devanathan, Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Dr. Nikhil K. Kothurkar, “Optimization of the conductivity and yield of chemically synthesized polyaniline using a design of experiments”, Journal of Applied Polymer Science, vol. 130, pp. 1047-1057, 2013.[Abstract]


<p>The electrical conductivity and yield of polyaniline (PANi) were optimized using a design of experiments (DOE). PANi samples were synthesized by the chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline using methane sulfonic acid as the dopant acid and ammonium persulfate as the oxidant. The main factors in the synthesis of PANi that can affect the conductivity were identified as (i) the concentration of dopant acid, (ii) oxidant-to-monomer ratio, and (iii) the addition rate of oxidant to monomer. Using a Box-Behnken DOE method the regression equation, main effects plots, contour plots, and optimization plots for conductivity and yield were generated and analyzed. Under the optimized conditions of dopant acid concentration of 0.9M, an oxidant addition rate of 30 mL/h and an OM ratio of 0.9, PANi with a conductivity of 1.95 S/cm and yield of 95% was obtained. The observed trends in the four-point probe conductivity measurements were correlated with the polymer structure using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and scanning electron microscopy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p>

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2012

Dr. Rajathilagam B., Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and P, S. K., “G-Lets: A New Signal Processing Algorithm”, International Journal of Computer Applications, vol. 37 , no. 6, pp. 1-7, 2012.[Abstract]


Different signal processing transforms provide us with unique decomposition capabilities. Instead of using specific transformation for every type of signal, we propose in this paper a novel way of signal processing using a group of transformations within the limits of Group theory. For different types of signal different transformation combinations can be chosen. It is found that it is possible to process a signal at multiresolution and extend it to perform edge detection, denoising, face recognition, etc by filtering the local features. For a finite signal there should be a natural existence of basis in it’s vector space. Without any approximation using Group theory it is seen that one can get close to this finite basis from different viewpoints. Dihedral groups have been demonstrated for this purpose.

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2012

Dr. Rajathilagam B., Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Soman, K. P., “G-Lets: Signal Processing Using Transformation Groups”, vol. arXiv:1201.2995v1, 2012.

2012

M. V and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Model-Based Composition Control of Binary Batch Distillation Column”, International Journal of Chemical Engineering Research, vol. 4(2), pp. 99-109, 2012.

2011

S. Sathiyan, Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Ramachandran, S., “Studies of Heat Transfer for Water-diesel Two-phase System in a Spiral Heat Exchanger”, Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Quarterly, vol. 25, pp. 195-201, 2011.[Abstract]


<In the present study, the main objective is to evolve a correlation to predict liquid-liquid two-phase heat transfer coefficients in a spiral plate heat exchanger. Experimental studies were conducted in a spiral plate heat exchanger using the liquid-liquid two-phase system of water-diesel in different volume fractions and flow rates as the cold fluid. Experiments were conducted by varying the volumetric flow rate and temperature, keeping the volumetric flow rate of hot fluid constant. The two-phase heat transfer coefficients were correlated with Reynolds number, Prandtl number and volume fraction in the form Nu = a (Re) b (Pr) c (φ) d. The data obtained from fresh experiments were compared with the predictions of the obtained correlation. The predicted coefficients showed a spread of ± 12 % in the laminar range, indicating the potential use for practical applications

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2010

Sa Sathiyan, Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Ramachandran, Sb, “An experimental study of spiral-plate heat exchanger for nitrobenzene-water two-phase system”, Bulgarian Chemical Communications, vol. 42, pp. 205-209, 2010.[Abstract]


This paper presents the results of two-phase (immiscible liquids) heat transfer studies, conducted using a spiral plate heat exchanger. Experimental studies were conducted using hot water as the service fluid. The two-phase system of nitrobenzene-water in different mass fractions and flow rates was studied as a cold process fluid. The two phase heat transfer coefficients were correlated with Reynolds numbers, Prandtl number, and by the following equation Nu = a. (Re)b. (Pr)c. (X)d, adopting an approach available in the literature for the two-phase flows. The data obtained from the experimental study are compared with the theoretical predictions. The predicted coefficients showed a spread of ± 15 % in the laminar range. This new correlation for predicting Nusselt number may be used for practical applications. © 2010 Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Union of Chemists in Bulgaria. More »»

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Title

2018

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, T, D. Bharathi, and S Anandh, P., “Differential Pulse Voltammetric Detection of Ferulic Acid Using RGO-TiO2 Electrodes”, in INDICON 2018, Coimbatore, 2018.

2018

M Pradeep Kumar, Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and Dr. Mini K. M., “Enhancement of Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behaviour of Concrete due to Addition of Ultrafine GGBS”, in International Conference on Advances in Construction Materials and Systems (ICACMS), RILEM Proceedings Pro118, 2018, p. 221.[Abstract]


The effects of introducing ultrafine ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) on the mechanical properties and the corrosion prevention properties of concrete are examined in this preliminary study. Introducing ultrafine GGBS reduces the workability of concrete, increases the compression strength, and surface bond stress. The ability of ultrafine GGBS to reduce corrosion of the steel rebar in concrete was studied using measurements of half-cell potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, and Tafel polarization in an accelerated environment 3.5% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4. For 10% addition of ultrafine GGBS, both the half cell and open circuit potentials shifted by about 20 mV, indicating enhanced cathodic protection of the steel rebar. The linear polarization resistance increased by about 50% from 50 K to 100 K by the addition of 10% ultrafine GGBS, while the corrosion current in Tafel polarization measurements reduced by 42%.

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2017

S. Vikram, Vasanthakumari, R., Tsuzuki, T., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Hydrodynamics of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles”, in Materials Today: Proceedings, 2017, vol. 4, pp. 10524-10528.[Abstract]


Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have found particular interest in magnetic drug targeting, hyperthermia, and magnetophoresis, where their flow behavior in the presence and absence of magnetic field is of particular interest. Magnetite nanoparticles of diameter 6.5 nm have been synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions at room temperature. They exhibit high magnetization (∼ 70-75 emu/g) even when chelated with citric acid. Hydrodynamics of these nanoparticles has been studied in water medium at flow rates similar to those observed in blood vessels under the influence of different magnetic fields up to 0.5 Tesla and at different distances from the tube wall. An experimental setup has been fabricated in-house comprising a straight test section, a peristaltic pump for pumping water, a permanent magnet mounted at different distances from the test section, and a CMOS camera mounted 90 degrees from the magnet to image the nanoparticles under the influence of magnetic and flow fields. The observed time-lapse images indicate that in the absence of an external magnetic field, the magnetic interactions between the nanoparticles are not strong enough to withstand the normal and shear forces arising from flow. Thus, most of the particles get washed away. Chelating the nanoparticles with citric acid disperses the nanoparticles more effectively, and also aid in flow of the nanoparticles away from the region of visualization. On the other, in the presence of a magnetic field, most of the nanoparticles are attracted to the wall of the tube closest to the magnet and are retained for longer durations. Yet, it is also seen that the hydrodynamic forces are able to gradually remove the retained nanoparticles. The developed setup is an effective means to study the hydrodynamics of iron oxide nanoparticles, particularly in relevance to emerging applications. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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2017

Dr. Rajathilagam B. and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Spectral representation of principal components in signals and images using G-lets decomposition of subbands”, in IEEE Region 10 Annual International Conference, Proceedings/TENCON, 2017, pp. 3809-3812.[Abstract]


This paper presents a spectral subband decomposition using G-lets in time-domain for 1-D and 2-D signals. The decomposition is achieved through successive filtering and decimation steps ending up in a decomposition tree. At each node of the tree, the parameters of the corresponding subband signal are estimated using high gradients obtained at the first node. The resulting subbands are found to highlight the components of the signal. The proposed method using G-lets enables one to reduce the processing time and makes the choice of decomposition levels easier, comparatively to the case where the whole signal is processed at once. The advantage of G-lets based subbands is demonstrated using 1-D and 2-D signals. It is seen that a synthetic signal generated from a sine and cosine signal is separated into exactly the same two signals and the performance is good for monocomponent and multicomponent signals. © 2016 IEEE.

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2015

B. Rajathilagam, B, B., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Dynamic Context-based User Profiles by Regression Modeling”, in of the 8th Annual International Conference on Computer Games, Multimedia and Allied Technology (CGAT 2015), GSTF,, Singapore, 2015.[Abstract]


Modelling the changing behaviour of a user is done by defining a user context for personalized services. Though many parameters have been identified to sense the context of a user automatically by a mobile device, identifying the right semantic context is still a challenge. Towards better defining user context for context aware mobile applications, this work proposes models for smarter context detection, a multidimensional evolutionary ontology, dynamic user profile generation, and a mapping of context and user preferences using a regression model. Some sample scenarios where the proposed method is an improvement over regular preference choices are shown. The proposed system is found to be dynamic and adaptive.

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2014

V. K, R, R. U. B., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Studying the Flow of Oil-Water Immiscible Liquid Mixtures in Small Channels”, in 1st International Conference on Recent Advances in Chemical, Environmental, and Energy Engineering (RACEEE-2014), February 27-28, 2014.

2014

Dr. Udaya Bhaskar Reddy Ragula, Shrinidhi, S. R., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Mixed-Paraffin Dehydrogenation in Fixed-bed Reactors: Modeling and Simulation,”, in Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting, , Atlanta, 2014.

2013

A. R. Rajamani and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electrodeposition of Bismuth and Effects of Additives in Acid Bath”, in ELAC 2013, 5th ISEAC Triennial International Conference on Advances and Recent Trends in Electrochemistry, pp. 341-344, Hyderabad, January 16-20, 2013.

2013

A. R. Rajamani and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electrodeposition of Bi and SnBi Alloys for Microelectronic Packaging”, in RATES 2013, International Conference on Recent Advances in Textile and Electrochemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi, March 21-23, 2013.

2013

R. D Kannan, R, R. A., S, K., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Graphene-based Electrochemical Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Dopamine, Uric Acid, and Ascorbic Acid”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications – AmritaBioQuest 2013, August 10-14, 2013.

2013

A. B, S, P. Anandh, Kothurkar N, and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Graphene-based Electrochemical Sensor for Paracetamol”, in International Conference on Biotechnology for Innovative Applications – AmritaBioQuest 2013, August 10-14, 2013.

2013

R. A. R and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electrodeposition of SnBi Alloys: Effects of pH and Additives”, in 51st NMD and 67th ATM of Indian Institute of Metals, IIT-BHU, November 12-15, 2013.

2012

S. K, R, R. A., S, R., Kothurkar N, and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Electrochemical Sensing of Dopamine on TiO2-RGO Nanocomposites”, in NMC 2012, 9th International Workshop on Nanomechanical Sensing, IIT Mumbai, June 6-8, 2012.

2012

M. D, Vikram S, M, D., R, V., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Effect of polar and nonpolar solvents in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Azadirachta indica leaf extract”, in National Symposium on Emerging Horizons in Biotechnology – Challenges and Prospects, Alpha Arts and Science College, September 20-21, 2012.

2012

D. M, S, R., Vikram S, Kothurkar N, Vasanthakumari, R., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “SWCNT-Polyimide Electrospun Nanocomposites”, in SWCNT-Polyimide Electrospun Nanocomposites”, 6th International Symposium on Macro-and Supramolecular Architectures and Materials on Nov 21-25, 2012.

2011

S. S, Dr. Murali Rangarajan, and S, R., “Thermal Effectiveness and Transfer Coefficients in Spiral Heat Exchangers for Liquid-Liquid Mixtures”, in CHEMCON, 2011.

2011

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, S, S., N, K., and S., R., “Towards Predicting Heat Transfer to Immiscible Liquid Mixtures”, in CHEMCON , 2011.

2011

M. V, M, S., J, S., R, S. S., and Dr. Murali Rangarajan, “Model-Based Composition Control of Binary Batch Distillation Column”, in COSMA, 2011.

2010

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, S, S., and S, R., “Modeling of Liquid-Liquid Two-Phase Heat Transfer in Spiral Plate Heat Exchanger”, in CHEMCON, 2010.

2003

Dr. Murali Rangarajan and R, R., “Understanding Polymer-Mediated Cell-Cell Interactions: Estimation of Polymer-Induced Forces”, in Annual Conference of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), 2003.

2002

Dr. Murali Rangarajan and R, R., “Thermodynamics of Interacting ‘Solid’/’Liquid’ Interfaces: Polymer Layers”, in Chemistry at Interfaces, Gordon Research Conferences (GRC), 2002.

2002

Dr. Murali Rangarajan, J, J., and R, R., “Interaction between Physisorbed Polymer Layers: Anisotropic Mean-Field Theory”, in at Chemistry at Interfaces, Gordon Research Conferences (GRC), 2002.

Invited Talks

  1. Rangarajan, M., “Flow Patterns in Oil-Water Immiscible Mixtures: Applications in Enhanced Heat and Mass Transfer”, Science Academies’ Lecture Workshop on Fluid Dynamics and Its Applications, PSGR Krishnammal College for Women, Coimbatore, December 22, 2014
  2. Rangarajan, M., “Electrodeposited Nano- and Micro-Structured Crystals of Bismuth on Polycrystalline Copper: Morphologies and Ultratrace Sensing of Heavy Metals”, 3rd Collaborative Conference on Crystal Growth – 3CG 2014, Phuket, Thailand, November 4-7, 2014
  3. Rangarajan, M., “Micro Electro Mechanical Systems for Automotive Applications”, INSA-Sponsored National Level Seminar on Application of Smart Materials and Structures in Automobiles, P. A. College of Engineering and Technology, Pollachi, September 29-30, 2014
  4. Prem Anandh, S., Kothurkar, N., and Rangarajan, M., “Electrochemical Sensing of Phenytoin by Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide”, Eleventh ISEAC International Discussion Meet on Electrochemistry & Its Applications, February 20-25, 2014
  5. Rangarajan, M., “Energy Harvesting and Recycling for Green Computing”, AICTE-Sponsored National Seminar on Green Computing for Sustainability, SNS College of Technology, Coimbatore, January 24, 2014
  6. Rangarajan, M., “Functionalized Graphene as Electrochemical Sensing Platform”, International Conference on Nanomaterials: Science, Technology, and Applications: ICNM 13, December 5-7, 2013
  7. Rangarajan, M., “Introduction to Process Simulation and ASPEN PLUS”,Three Day Faculty Development Program on Process Modeling and Simulation using Aspen and Aspen Hysys, MS Ramiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore, August 2013
  8. Rangarajan, M., “Mathematical Modeling and Simulation in Environmental Science”, Faculty Development Program on Advances on Environmental Science, Sree Krishna College of Engineering, August 2011
  9. Rangarajan, M., “Quantum Mechanics: Applications to Materials and Device Design”, State Level Symposium on Advances in Physics, Sri Parasakthi College for Women, Courtallam, March 2011
  10. Rangarajan, M., “Model-based Optimization and Control of an Atmospheric Crude Distillation Unit”, National Seminar on Control of Nonlinear Systems, Adhiyamaan College of Engineering, Hosur, October 2009