Qualification: 
MD, MBBS
dmvasudevan@aims.amrita.edu

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan currently serves as Head of PG Programs and Research, Amrita School of Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham.

Education

YEAR DEGREE/PROGRAM INSTITUTION
January 1992 – December 1994 FRCPath (Fellow of Royal College of Pathology) Royal College of Pathology, United Kingdom
January 1972 Post Doctoral Research Swiss Cancer Institute, Switzerland · Lausanne
July 1969 – April 1971 MD (Biochemistry) All India Institute of Medical Sciences, India
July 1962 – December 1967 MBBS University of Kerala, India

Awards & Achievements

  • Jan 1974: Eleanor Roosevelt International Senior Cancer Fellowship by International Union Against Cancer [Scholarship].
  • 1992: Dr. B. C. Roy Award for Eminent Medical Teacher, (Indian Medical Council), received from the Hon’ble President of India.

Teaching Experience

YEAR AFFILIATION
23-02-1968 to 15-07-1969 Tutor, Biochemistry, Calicut Medical College, Kerala
18-07-1969 to 21-05-1971 Post graduate Fellow, AIIMS, New Delhi
04-06-1971 to 01-08-1971 Tutor, Biochemistry, Medical College Calicut, Kerala
02-08-1971 to 18-02-1972 Asst. Professor, Biochemistry, Medical College, Calicut
21-02-1972 to 29-01-1974 Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Institute of Cancer Research, Switzerland
04-02-1974 to 24-04-1978 Asst. Professor, Biochemistry, Medical College, Calicut.
02-05-1978 to 16.11.1979 Asst. Professor, Biochemistry, Medical College, Trivandrum 
17-11-1979 to 30-11-1982 Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Head of Department of Cancer Research, Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum
01-12-1982 to 31-07-1987 Research Director, Amala Cancer Research Centre, Trichur
01-08-1987 to 15-05-1989 Professor & Head, Department of Biochemistry Medical College, Kottayam
16-05-1989 to 02-05-1996 Professor and Head, Biochemistry, Medical College, Trichur
18-07-1992 to:15-05-1993 Vice-Principal, Medical College, Trichur
01-07-1994 to 10-01-1996 Acting Principal, Medical College, Trichur 
23-05-1996 to 07-09-1998 Professor of Biochemistry, KMC, Mangalore
08-09-1998 to 31-03-2000 Professor of Biochemistry, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal
01-04-2000 to 31-01-2002 Dean, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences, Gangtok 
13-02-2002 to 31-12-2008 Principal Amrita School of Medicine and Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi
01-01-2008 continues Professor of Biochemistry, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Kochi

PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENTS

  1. Fellow, College of Allergy & Applied Immunology (FCAI) 1978.
  2. Fellow, Indian Academy of Medical Specialities (FIAMS) 1982.
  3. Fellow, National Academy of Medical Sciences, (FAMS), 1992.
  4. Founder Head, Cancer Research Laboratory at Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum (1979 to 82)
  5. Founder Head, Cancer Research Laboratory at Amala Cancer Research Centre (1982 to 87)
  6. Founder Dean, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences, Gangtok, 2000 – 2002
  7. Founder Principal, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Kochi, 2002-2008
  8. Author of Textbook of Biochemstry for Medical Students, now in 6th edition, total more than 100,000 copies sold

Membership

  • Life Member, Indian Medical Association, 1968 onwards
  • Life member, Indian Immunology Society, 1974 onwards
  • Life member, Association of Clinical Biochemists of India, 1990 onwards
  • Vice President of the Indian Immunology Society, 1986 to 1988.
  • President, Indian Association of Clinical Biochemists of India (ACBI) 2010
  • Member, Governing Body of Amala Cancer Research Centre, 1984 - 1998.
  • Member, Task Force of Life Sciences, Science Technology and Environment, Government of Kerala (1985-87)
  • Expert member, State Board of Medical Research, Directorate of Medical Education, Kerala, (1993 to l996)
  • Member, Board of Studies in Biochemistry, M G University, (1988-1992).
  • Member, Board of Studies, Faculty of Medicine (UG), Calicut University (1992 to 1998)
  • Member, Board of Studies, Biotechnology, M G University (1995 - 2000)
  • Member, Academic Council of Biotechnology, M.G. University (1996 to 2000)
  • Member, Faculty of Science, M.G. University, Kottayam, Kerala, (1996 onwards) 
  • Member, Board of Studies in Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin (1996 onwards)
  • Member, Board of Studies, Biochemistry, University of Calicut,(1997 onwards)
  • Member, Academic Senate of Manipal Academy of Higher Education, (Deemed University), 1997 to 2000.
  • Member, Board of Studies in Paramedical studies, University of Calicut, (1998 to 2000)
  • Member, Board of Studies in Postgraduate Basic Medical Sciences, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute (Deemed University), 1999 to 2002.
  • Member, Board of Studies, Faculty of Medicine (PG). Calicut University (2002 onwards)
  • Member, Academic Council, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham (Deemed University), 2002 -2008
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee of the Institute for Cytology and Preventive Oncology, Indian Council of Medical Research, 1996 to 2002.
  • Member, Advisory Committee, National Institute of Occupational Health (Indian Council of Medical Research) 2007 onwards.

Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2015

Journal Article

S. Palazhy, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Kamath, Pb, “Elevated oxidative stress among coronary artery disease patients on statin therapy: A cross sectional study”, Indian Heart Journal, vol. 67, pp. 227-232, 2015.[Abstract]


{Background Statins are a major group of drugs that reduces LDL-C levels, which are proven to have other beneficial effects such as preventing coronary events. The objective of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress and select novel coronary artery disease risk factors among coronary artery disease patients on statins. Methods In this observational, cross-sectional study, we compared total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein (a), homocysteine, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbic acid, malondialdehyde and oxidized LDL among male coronary artery disease patients on statin therapy (group 2) More »»

2014

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Mukaddam, Q. I., and Naik, M. M., “Efficacy and safety of methylcobalamin, alpha lipoic acid and pregabalin combination versus pregabalin monotherapy in improving pain and nerve conduction velocity in type 2 diabetes associated impaired peripheral neuropathic condition. [MAINTAIN]: Results”, Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology, vol. 17, pp. 480-481, 2014.

2014

Journal Article

S. K. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Tulsi: The Indian holy power plant”, Indian Journal of Natural Products and Resources, vol. 5, pp. 279-283, 2014.[Abstract]


Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum Linn.) herb has been known from as early as the Vedic period. Its extract has numerous pharmacological activities like hypoglycaemic, immunomodulatory, antistress, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcerogenic, antihypertensive, CNS depressant, radioprotective, antitumour and antibacterial. The active constituents of the herb include volatile oil chiefly eugenol and β-caryophyllene, flavonoids and a number of other components present in fixed oil. This article outlines the present knowledge of pharmacological and other studies on this plant. © 2014, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved. More »»

2013

Journal Article

M. P. Narayanan, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Menon, K. Nb, “Analysis of gene mutations among South Indian patients with maple syrup urine disease: Identification of four novel mutations”, Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences, vol. 50, pp. 442-446, 2013.[Abstract]


Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1α, E1β and E2 subunits of the branched-chain a-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen South Indian MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD. © 2013 National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.

More »»

2013

Journal Article

S. Palazhy, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Kamath, P., “Association of Hyperhomocysteinemia with Smoking, Hypertension, Diabetes and Age In Coronary Artery Disease Subjects”, Journal of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology, pp. 123-127, 2013.[Abstract]


Background: Several large-scale international studies have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Though homocysteine levels among CAD subjects of different populations in India have been studied, the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with conventional CAD risk factors has not been thoroughly investigated. Our objective was to study the association between hyperhomocysteinemia and a few conventional risk factors among CAD subjects of Kerala. Methods and Results: We estimated plasma homocysteine concentration among coronary artery disease subjects (n=92) and investigated the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with smoking, hypertension, diabetes and age in these subjects. Smokers had elevated homocysteine levels when compared to non-smokers (18.3 ± 8.8 vs. 12.4 ± 6.7 μmoles/L); increased homocysteine concentrations were noticed among hypertensives compared to non-hypertensives (15.3 ± 6.7 vs.12.9 ± 8.5 μmoles/L), while no significant differences were noticed between diabetics and non-diabetics and also between subjects stratified into different groups based on age. Smoking and hypertension were found to contribute to hyperhomocysteinemia independent of other variables studied. Conclusions: It can be concluded from this study that among the variables studied, hyperhomocysteinemia was strongly associated with smoking and hypertension in CAD subjects of this population. (J Clin Prev Cardiol 2013;2(3):123-7) More »»

2012

Journal Article

M. P. Narayanan, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Vaidyanathan, K., “Clinical outcome of major organic acidemias - A three years follow-up study”, Journal of Pediatric Biochemistry, vol. 2, pp. 169-176, 2012.[Abstract]


The term "organic acidemia" or "organic aciduria" (OA) applies to inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in which organic acids accumulate in tissues and biological fluids. Classical organic acidurias include methylmalonic aciduria (MMA), propionic aciduria (PA), isovaleric aciduria (IVA) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Aminoacidurias like phenylketonuria are common in the western population. Organic acidemias like MMA, PA and MSUD are more common in Asian countries, especially in India compared with the west. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and treatment outcome of organic acidemias in a study population in India. Four hundred and twenty suspected cases of organic acidemias with an upper age limit of twelve years were enrolled over a two years period beteween January, 2007 and December, 2008, with a three years patient follow-up. Screening tests and thin layer chromatography followed by quantification of organic acids in urine and quantification of amino acids in blood by high performance liquid chromatography were done for detection of organic acidemias. Out of 420 patients, 45 patients (10.7%) were found to have organic acidemias, 15 cases of MMA, 16 cases of PA, 13 cases of MSUD, and one case of IVA were identified. Fifteen patients (33.3%) died during the course and remaining 30 are under therapeutic regimen and showed marked clinical improvement. Therapeutic regimens based on protein restriction, sodium bicarbonate (to correct acidosis), L-carnitine and vitamins were given to the patients. Prompt diagnosis helped to provide specific treatment to majority of these patients with rapid improvement in symptomatology. © 2012 - IOS Press and the authors. More »»

2012

Journal Article

S. Mukherjee, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Das, S. K., “Dietary grapes (vitis vinifera) feeding attenuates ethanol-induced oxidative stress in blood and modulates immune functions in mice”, Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences, vol. 49, pp. 379-385, 2012.[Abstract]


Ethanol metabolism is known to induce overwhelming production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and also to cause associated immune dysfunction. Several interventional agents of plant origin, in particular fruits and vegetables have been used to counteract these alterations induced by ethanol. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of dietary feeding of skin and flesh of grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) on the alterations in immune and vascular functions in mice with liver abnormalities induced by chronic ethanol consumption. Results revealed that feeding of both grape skin and flesh (2.5 g/kg body wt/day) effectively attenuated the oxidative stress and alterations in immune function and angiogenesis induced by chronic ethanol consumption (1.6 g/kg body wt/day for 12 weeks) in mice. The antioxidant actions of the grape skin and flesh as observed in this study might be attributed to the polyphenols present in the grapes. © 2012, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.

More »»

2012

Journal Article

S. K. Das, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Dhanya, L., “Erratum: Biomarkers of alcoholism: An updated review (Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation (2008) 68:2 (81-92) DOI: 10.1080/00365510701532662)”, Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, vol. 72, p. 343, 2012.

2012

Journal Article

, Mukherjee, S., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effects of long term ethanol consumption mediated oxidative stress on neovessel generation in liver”, Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods, vol. 22, pp. 375-382, 2012.[Abstract]


Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, is essential during tissue repair. Though most molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis are common to the liver and other organs, there was no report available whether alcoholic liver disease also causes angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of long term ethanol (1.6g/kg body weight/day) consumption on angiogenic responses in the liver of male Wistar strain albino rats (1618 weeks old, weighing 200220g) up to 36 weeks. Chronic ethanol consumption was associated with not only elevated oxidative stress, and altered cytokines expression, but also developed large von Willebrand factor, fibrosis and activation of matrix metalloproteinases. Moreover, vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor 2 (VEGF-R2, fetal liver kinase 1: Flk-1/KDR) expression and neovessel generation in the rat liver were noted after 36 weeks of ethanol consumption. Thus our study provides novel evidence that long-term ethanol consumption is associated with angiogenesis through delicate and coordinated action of a variety of mediators. © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

More »»

2012

Journal Article

K. Vaidyanathan and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Organ specific tumor markers: What's new?”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 27, pp. 110-120, 2012.[Abstract]


Tumor markers are molecules produced in the body in response to cancer. An ideal tumor marker should have high sensitivity and specificity, should be cheap, and should be easily detected in body fluids. Identification of novel markers is important and it is expected that with the advent of newer technologies, more reliable markers will be discovered. This review discusses the currently available tumor markers for different malignancies. © 2012 Association of Clinical Biochemists of India.

More »»

2012

Journal Article

A. Anilkumar, Kappanayil, M., Nampoothiri, S., Thampi, M. V., Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and R Kumar, K., “Screening for TBX1 gene in children with or without microdeletion of chromosome 22q11 and conotruncal defect”, Laboratory Medicine, vol. 43, pp. 11-13, 2012.[Abstract]


Objective: In order to understand the role of the TBX1 gene in humans, Indian children with or without a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11 and conotruncal defects were screened by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a TBX1 commercial probe. Methods: All patients were tested with commercial FISH probes on chromosome 22q11. Besides these, the deletion of the distal arm of chromosome 10 was analyzed, and phenotypic features were also taken into consideration. Results: A comparable result showing 22q11 deletion was obtained using the 3 probes (TBX1, TUPLE1, and N25) from the chromosome 22q11 region. Conclusion: The study confirms the role of contiguous genes including TBX1 in the pathogenesis of conotruncal defects. It also indicates that in a routine clinical practice either of the FISH probes (ie, TUPLE1, N25 or TBX1) can be used to detect 22q11 deletion. Such genetic testing is important, since patients with 22q11 deletion need early medical intervention based on associated symptoms. © by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

More »»

2012

Journal Article

S. Palazhy, Kamath, P., Rajesh, P. C., Vaidyanathan, K., Nair, S. K., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Composition of plasma and atheromatous plaque among coronary artery disease subjects consuming coconut oil or sunflower oil as the cooking medium.”, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 31, pp. 392-396, 2012.[Abstract]


Coconut oil, which is rich in medium-chain saturated fatty acids, is the principal cooking medium of the people of Kerala, India. Replacement of saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat is effective in reducing serum cholesterol levels. However, the effect of substituting coconut oil with sunflower oil on the fatty acid composition of plaque has not been thoroughly investigated. We therefore evaluated and compared the fatty acid composition of plasma and plaque among subjects consuming coconut oil or sunflower oil as the cooking medium. Endarterectomy samples and plasma samples were obtained from subjects who underwent coronary artery bypass grafts (n = 71). The subjects were grouped based on the type of oil they were using as their cooking medium (coconut oil or sunflower oil). The fatty acid composition in the plaques and the plasma was determined by HPLC and the data were analyzed statistically. Sunflower oil consumers had elevated concentrations of linoleic acid (p = 0.001) in plasma, while coconut oil users had higher myristic acid levels (p = 0.011) in plasma. Medium-chain fatty acids did not differ significantly between the two groups in the plasma. Medium-chain fatty acids were detected in the plaques in both groups of subjects. In contrast to previous reports, long-chain saturated fatty acids dominated the lipid content of plaque in this population, and the fatty acid composition of plaque was not significantly different between the two groups. No correlation between fatty acids of plasma and plaque was observed in either group. A change in cooking medium, although it altered the plasma fatty acid composition, was not reflected in the plaque composition. More »»

2012

Journal Article

M. Pullurmann Narayanan, Vaidyanathan, K., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Clinical outcome of major organic acidemias–A three years follow-up study”, Journal of Pediatric Biochemistry, vol. 2, pp. 169–176, 2012.[Abstract]


The term "organic acidemia" or "organic aciduria" (OA) applies to inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in which organic acids accumulate in tissues and biological fluids. Classical organic acidurias include methylmalonic aciduria (MMA), propionic aciduria (PA), isovaleric aciduria (IVA) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Aminoacidurias like phenylketonuria are common in the western population. Organic acidemias like MMA, PA and MSUD are more common in Asian countries, especially in India compared with the west. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and treatment outcome of organic acidemias in a study population in India. Four hundred and twenty suspected cases of organic acidemias with an upper age limit of twelve years were enrolled over a two years period beteween January, 2007 and December, 2008, with a three years patient follow-up. Screening tests and thin layer chromatography followed by quantification of organic acids in urine and quantification of amino acids in blood by high performance liquid chromatography were done for detection of organic acidemias. Out of 420 patients, 45 patients (10.7%) were found to have organic acidemias, 15 cases of MMA, 16 cases of PA, 13 cases of MSUD, and one case of IVA were identified. Fifteen patients (33.3%) died during the course and remaining 30 are under therapeutic regimen and showed marked clinical improvement. Therapeutic regimens based on protein restriction, sodium bicarbonate (to correct acidosis), L-carnitine and vitamins were given to the patients. Prompt diagnosis helped to provide specific treatment to majority of these patients with rapid improvement in symptomatology. More »»

2011

Journal Article

M. P. Narayanan, Kannan, V., Vinayan, K. P., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Diagnosis of organic acidurias in children: Two years experience at a tertiary care centre”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 26, pp. 347-353, 2011.[Abstract]


Organic acid disorders are inherited metabolic disorders in which organic acids accumulate in tissues and biological fluids of affected individuals. Classical organic acidurias include methylmalonic aciduria, propionic aciduria, isovaleric aciduria and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). They are considered the most frequent metabolic disorders among severely ill children. Patients frequently present with acute symptoms early in life. 420 cases clinically suspected to have organic aciduria, with upper age limit of 12 years for a 2-year period (January 2007-December 2008) were enrolled into this study. Metabolic acidosis and neurological symptoms were the most common signs. Screening tests and thin layer chromatography were done for detection of organic acidurias. Identification and quantitation of organic acids in urine and quantification of amino acids in blood were done by high performance liquid chromatography. Out of 420 patients, 45 patients (10.7%) were found to have organic acidurias. 15 cases of methylmalonic aciduria, 16 cases of propionic aciduria, 13 cases of MSUD, and one case of isovaleric aciduria were diagnosed. Results demonstrate the importance of testing for organic acidurias. Since organic aciduria may cause irreversible brain damage if not treated, we recommend selective screening amongst severely ill children despite implied extra costs. © 2011 Association of Clinical Biochemists of India. More »»

2011

Journal Article

K. Vaidyanathan, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Narayanan, M. P., “Organic acidurias: An updated review”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 26, pp. 319-325, 2011.[Abstract]


Organic acidurias are an important class of inherited metabolic disorders arising due to defect in intermediary metabolic pathways of carbohydrate, amino acids and fatty acid oxidation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the important organic acidurias in the Indian population. Specifically, diagnosis and principles of treatment of organic acidurias are covered. The salient features of common organic acidurias as well as their prevalence in various parts of the world are reviewed in some detail. © 2011 Association of Clinical Biochemists of India. More »»

2011

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Health benefits of coconut oil”, COCOINFO INTERNATIONA;, vol. 18, 2011.[Abstract]


The per capita coconut oil consumption in Kerala State has been reduced to one-third during the last 50 years. However, during the same p[eriod, the rate of heart attack has been increased to 3 times in the same population. This alone will be sufficient to show that coconut oil has nothing to do with heart attacks. Studies at Kochi showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the cholesterol, HDL or LDL levels in coconut oil consuming population versus sunflower oil consuming population. Moreover, 71 samples of plaques were analysed for the composition of fatty acids in them. Plaques did not contain significant amounts of lauric acid or myristic acid (fatty acids from coconut oil. Instead, palmitic acid and stearic acid (long chain fatty acids) were the main ingredients of these plaques. Fatty acid contents of plaques from coconut oil consuming group and sunflower consuming group were the same. More »»

2010

Journal Article

, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Vaidyanathan, K., and Das, S. K., “Role of plasma amino acids and GABA in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - A pilot study”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 25, pp. 37-42, 2010.[Abstract]


Alcohol appears to affect brain function, primarily by interfering with the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and other neurotransmitters. As alcohol is mainly metabolized in the liver, therefore we undertook this pilot study to monitor the patterns of changes in plasma amino-acid concentrations due to alcoholic and nonalcohol fatty liver disease and their relation with plasma GABA level. Plasma amino-acid concentrations were measured in 25 alcoholic liver disease (ALD) patients, 18 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients, and 24 age and sex matched control subjects by HPLC. GABA concentration was elevated, while isoleucine and leucine levels reduced significantly in ALD patients compared to the control subjects. Methionine and phenylalanine levels elevated and valine content reduced significantly in ALD patients compared to other two groups, and GABA level was significantly correlated with methionine and phenylalanine. Plasma concentration of lysine was significantly reduced in both groups of liver disease patients compared to the control group, but was not correlated with GABA level. Glycine and tyrosine levels reduced significantly in NAFLD patients compared to other two groups and were significantly correlated with GABA. Interestingly, though amino acids such as alanine, histidine, proline and serine were not affected by liver diseases, but were significantly correlated with GABA level. This pilot study indicated that alcoholic liver disease presented a more deranged plasma amino acid pattern than nonalcoholic, and the amino acid imbalances. More studies are necessary to identify the role of any particular amino acid on brain function and on neurotransmitter(s).

More »»

2009

Journal Article

G. Samak, Shenoy, R., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “A Comparativetudy of Nitric oxide and Hydrogen Peroxide scavenging activities of botanical extracts of Ocimum sanctum and Wagatea spicata”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, 2009.

2008

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Das, S. K., and Mukherjee, S., “Medicinal properties of milk thistle with special reference to silymarinñ an overview”, Natural Product Radiance, vol. 7, pp. 182-192, 2008.[Abstract]


Milk Thistle, Silybum marianum Gaertn. plant has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for several diseases. Its active constituent, silymarin displays several medicinal properties, viz. antioxidant, hepatoprotective, cytoprotective, amelioration of hepatic collagen accumulation in advanced fibrosis, immunomodulatory activity, etc. Present paper summarizes various research reports on the medicinal properties of the plant with special reference to silymarin. More »»

2008

Journal Article

G. Samak, Rao, M., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “HYPOLIPIDEMIC AND ANTIOXIDANT EFFICACY OF OCIMUM SANCTUM IN PREVENTING ATHEROGENESIS IN MALE ALBINO RABBITS”, Atherosclerosis Supplements, vol. 9, p. 216, 2008.

2007

Journal Article

S. K. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Essential factors associated with hepatic angiogenesis”, Life Sciences, vol. 81, pp. 1555-1564, 2007.[Abstract]


Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, is essential during tissue repair. In contrast, uncontrolled angiogenesis promotes tumor. A balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic growth factors and cytokines tightly controls angiogenesis. With the identification of several proangiogenic molecules such as the vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), and the angiopoietins, and the recent description of specific inhibitors of angiogenesis such as platelet factor, angiostatin, endostatin, and vasostatin, it is recognized that therapeutic interference with vasculature formation offers a tool for clinical applications in various pathologies. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More »»

2007

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Das, S. K., “Alcohol-induced oxidative stress”, Life Sciences, vol. 81, pp. 177-187, 2007.[Abstract]


Alcohol-induced oxidative stress is linked to the metabolism of ethanol involving both microsomal and mitochondrial systems. Ethanol metabolism is directly involved in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). These form an environment favourable to oxidative stress. Ethanol treatment results in the depletion of GSH levels and decreases antioxidant activity. It elevates malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroxyethyl radical (HER), and hydroxynonenal (HNE) protein adducts. These cause the modification of all biological structures and consequently result in serious malfunction of cells and tissues. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. More »»

2007

Journal Article

Sb Dutta, Maneesh, M., Chakrabarti, A., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Experimental therapeutic intervention with alpha tocopherol in ethanol induced testicular injuries in rats”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 22, pp. 138-142, 2007.[Abstract]


Infertility is well-established harmful effect in chronic alcoholism and so far, there is no effective treatment for this condition. The study was conducted to determine the effects of alpha tocopherol on ethanol induced testicular injuries in male albino rats of Wistar strain. Five groups (n=6) of animals were used. Group I served as control. Group II received daily 1.6g ethanol/kg body weight/day for 4 weeks orally. Group III received 1.6g ethanol + 80mg alpha tocopherol/kg body weight/day for four weeks orally. Group IV received 1.6g ethanol /kg body weight for/day 4 weeks and followed by 80mg alpha tocopherol/kg body weight/day for four weeks orally. Group V received 1.6g ethanol/kg body weight/day orally for 4 weeks, followed by 4 weeks abstinence. Twentyfour hours after the last treatment the rats were sacrificed using anesthetic ether. Testes were removed and used for the estimation of extent of lipid peroxidation and tissue levels of antioxidants and steroidogenic enzymes. Alpha tocopherol treatment increased the activities of testicular Δ5, 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD. Moreover, the treatment was also associated with significant decrease in testicular oxidative stress. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress and decreased steroidogenesis can be reversed by treatment with alpha tocopherol. More »»

2007

Journal Article

S. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effects of Ethanol Consumption on Different Organs, a Brief Overview”, Asian Journal of Biochemistry, pp. 386-394, 2007.[Abstract]


Effects of ethanol consumption on different organs are discussed in this review. Chronic alcoholism is a major public health problem and causes multiorgan diseases and toxicity. Ethanol is the most psychoactive substance used in the society. this is a small molecule soluble in both water and lipids. Therefore it permeates all the tissues of the the body and affects the vital functions. It is causally related to more than 60 medical conditions. Therefore a systematic effort is required to enhance the dehence of body against the toxic effects of ethanol consumption considering the nutrirional uptake of an individual the blood stream transports ethanol to all parts of the body. so most tieesues such as brain liver, kidney and testes are exposed to the same concentration as in the blood More »»

2007

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Das, S., “Effect of Alcohol on Brain: A Brief Overview”, SFRR India Bulletin , 2007.[Abstract]


The brain is vulnurable to injury from alcohol consumption. Multiple factors can influence the brain as a consequence of alcohol consumotion. Alcoholism related brtain damage might be associated with an individuaks age, gender drinking history and nutrition as well as with the vulnurebality of specific areas of brain. The generation of neuronal cells is associated with alcohol pathology. Oneof the proposed mechanism of alcohol-indiced brain damage is due to increased oxidatibe stess causing damage to mitochondria and altering the funvtions of gila cells. Alcohol can induce oxidative stress through the generation og ROS or may reduce antioxidant levels. Experimental evicence to alcohol cell damage. Nutritional deficiency and ethanol toxicity acting synergistically in nervous system paves the way for therapeutiv interventions and treatment of alcoholism More »»

2006

Journal Article

S. K. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Reply [5]”, Indian Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 38, p. 438, 2006.

2006

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Das, S. K., “Protective effects of silymarin, a milk thistle (Silybium marianum) derivative on ethanol-induced oxidative stress in liver”, Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 43, pp. 306-311, 2006.[Abstract]


The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered to be a major factor in oxidative cell injury. The antioxidant activity or the inhibition of the generation of free radicals is important in providing protection against such hepatic damage. Silymarin, derived from the milk thistle plant, Silybium marianum, has been used in traditional medicine as a remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. In the present study, the effect of hepatoprotective drug silymarin on body weight and biochemical parameters, particularly, antioxidant status of ethanol-exposed rats was studied and its efficacy was compared with the potent antioxidant, ascorbic acid as well as capacity of hepatic regeneration during abstention. Ethanol, at a dose of 1.6 g/kg body wt/day for 4 wks affected body weight in 16-18 week-old male albino rats (Wistar strain weighing 200-220 g). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) activities were significantly increased, whereas GSH content, and catalase, glutathione reductase (GR) and GPx (glutathione peroxidase) activities significantly reduced, on ethanol exposure. These changes were reversed by silybin and ascorbic acid treatment. It was also observed that abstinence from ethanol might help in hepatic regeneration. Silybin showed a significant hepatoprotective activity, but activity was less than that of ascorbic acid. Furthermore, preventive measures were more effective than curative treatment. More »»

2006

Journal Article

S. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Drugs and non-alcoholic steato hepatitis”, Indian Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 38, pp. 238-242, 2006.[Abstract]


Health complications associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and associated co-morbidities including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Additionally, NASH has been associated with several drugs. Though steatohepatitis is a rare form of drug induced liver disease, it has generated great interest in the recent past. Oral hypoglycemic agents, lipid lowering agents, antihypertensives, and antiobesity medication underlie a significant proportion of well-recognized hepatotoxicity. While some medications have predictable toxicity, many more are associated with idiosyncratic reactions. The toxic mechanism appears to involve mitochondrial injury, impaired β-oxidation, generation of reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion. If a drug is suspected, it is probably prudent to stop this medication. More »»

2006

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Das, S. K., “Modulation of lecithin activity by vitamin-B complex to treat long term consumption of ethanol induced oxidative stress in liver”, Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 44, pp. 791-801, 2006.[Abstract]


Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) develops as a consequence of priming and sensitizing mechanisms rendered by cross-interactions of primary mechanistic factors and secondary risk factors. Chronic alcohol abuse and its progression to ALD are associated with abnormal metabolism and low tissue or plasma levels, or both, of many micronutrients. Glutathione depletion is considered the most important sensitizing mechanism. In the present study efficacy of lecithin with vitamin-B complex to treat ethanol induced oxidative stress was compared with the effect of lecithin alone, tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E), as well as capacity of hepatic regeneration during abstention. Ethanol (1.6g / kg body weight/ day for 4 weeks) affects body weight in 16-18 week old male albino rats of Wistar strain weighing 200-220 g. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level, nitrite content, protein carbonyl group level, redox ratio (oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio), superoxide dismutase activity, and glutathione s-transferase activity significantly increased on ethanol exposure. Whereas reduced glutathione content, and activities of catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase significantly reduced due to ethanol exposure. These changes were reversed by different treatment. The results suggest that tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E) could partially reverse these changes and act as a potential therapeutic agent. However, lecithin with vitamin-B complex treatment is a promising therapeutic approach. Furthermore, preventive measures were more effective than curative treatment. Prevention of oxidative and nitrosative stress along with correction of nutritional deficiency is one of the proposed mechanisms for the therapeutic approach. More »»

2006

Journal Article

S. Kumar Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effect of Ursodeoxycholic Acid On Ethanol Induced Oxidative Stress In Liver”, SFRR Inida Bulletin, vol. 4, pp. 15-19, 2006.[Abstract]


Alcohol consumption has been associated with alcoholic hepatitis, fatty infiltrataion of liver, accelerated progression of liver disease, a higher frequence of cirrhosis, with significant incidents of hepatocellular carcinoma, and death. There is no approved therapeutics intervention for alcoholic liver disease; hwever early stages are treatable. Ursodeoxycholic acid(ursidol) is a non-toxic cholestatic liver disorders.In the present study efficiacy of ursodiol to treat ethanol induced oxidatitive stress was monitored. It was found that ethanol-induced oxidative stess could be marginally prevented by ursodeoxycholic acid supplementation. Absentation from alcohol improved hepatic regeneration. More »»

2006

Journal Article

S. K. Das, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Dey, S. S., and , “Effect of fluoride on thyroid functions: Myths and facts”, Thyroid Research and Practice, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 14-19, 2006.

2005

Journal Article

M. Maneesh, .Jayalekshmi, H., Dutta, S., Chakrabarti, A., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Role of Oxidative Stress in Ethanol Induced Germ Cell Apoptosis—an Experimental Study in Rats”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 20, pp. 62–67, 2005.[Abstract]


The study was undertaken to evaluate the possible involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ethanol induced testicular atrophy in rats. Adult male rats were orally administered ethanol at a dose of 1.6 g/kg body weight/day for four weeks. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment the rats were sacrificed using anesthetic ether. Testes were removed and weighed. Apoptosis was studied by using the Feulgen reaction on 5 μ thin paraffin sections of testis. Testicular homogenate was prepared and centrifuged. The supernatant was used for the estimation of extent of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense status. There was significant reduction in body weight: and in testicular weight and diameter in ethanol treated rats. Extent of germ cell apoptosis was significantly high in ethanol treated rats. Ethanol treated rats showed significantly high tissue TBARS level and glutathione S-transferase activity; and low tissue ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in high oxidative stress in the testes either due to increased extent of lipid peroxidation or due to decreased antioxidant defenses, and thereby induces germ cell apoptosis leading to testicular atrophy.

More »»

2005

Journal Article

M. Maneesh, .Jayalekshmi, H., Dutta, S., Chakrabarti, A., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effect of Chronic Ethanol Administration on Testicular Antioxidant System and Steroidogenic Enzyme Activity in Ratsc”, Indian J Exp Biol, vol. 43, pp. 445–449, 2005.[Abstract]


In order to find out the effect of chronic ethanol administration on testicular antioxidant system and steroidogenic enzyme activity, male rats fed with ethanol 1.6g/kg body weight per day for four weeks were studied. Besides a drastic reduction in body and testis weight, there was decrease in ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in the testicular tissue of the treated animals. Simultaneously, there was increase in lipid peroxidation and glutathione S-transferase activity. Activities of 3β-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase were also found decreased in the treated animals. The results indicate that chronic ethanol administration resulted in increase in oxidative stress and decrease in the activities of steroidogenic enzymes in the rat testes. More »»

2005

Journal Article

K. Prabhu, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Bhat, P. G., “Can serum glutathione-s-transferase levels in carcinoma cervix be a predictor of radiation response?”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 20, pp. 95-97, 2005.[Abstract]


We conducted a pilot study wherein serum Glutathione-S-transferase levels were measured before and after radiotherapy in carcinoma cervix patients and correlated with response to treatment during a two-year follow-up period. Out of 17 patients who received radiotherapy, 9 showed a significant decrease (p< 0.005) while 8 showed significant increase (p< 0.004) in post radiotherapy glutathione-S-transferase values as compared to pre treatment values respectively. These patients were followed up for two years and we observed that 71% who had significant increase in post radiotherapy values had relapse of cancer within 2 years where as 66% of those who had significant decrease in post radiotherapy values had no evidence of relapse. This shows that alterations in serum Glutathione-S-transferase levels may help us to predict radiation response. More »»

2005

Journal Article

S. K. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effect of ethanol on liver antioxidant defense systems: A dose dependent study”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 20, pp. 80-84, 2005.[Abstract]


Alcohol induced oxidative stress is linked to the metabolism of ethanol. In this study it has been observed that administration of ethanol in lower concentration caused gain in body and liver weight, while higher concentration of ethanol caused lesser gain in body and liver weight. Ethanol treatment enhanced lipid peroxidation significantly, depletion in levels of hepatic glutathione and ascorbate, accompanied by a decline in the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, and increased in hepatic glutathione s-transferase activity. Interestingly catalase activity increased in lower concentration of ethanol exposure, and decreased in higher concentration. Superoxide dismutase activity was also increased on ethanol exposure. But, ethanol feeding did not show any effect on glucose-6- phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Ethanol ingestion perturbs the antioxidant system in a dose and time dependent manner. More »»

2005

Journal Article

S. K. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Biochemical diagnosis of alcoholism”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 20, pp. 35-42, 2005.[Abstract]


Medically diagnosed alcoholics can be differentiated reliably from non-alcoholics using clinically laboratory tests. In the present study, patients with liver diseases either due to alcohol or without alcohol compared with a group of normal healthy persons. Heavy drinkers showed significantly lower body weight and percent body fat, and low BMI compared with other groups. The percentage of hemoglobin and total number of RBC were found to be significantly decreased, whereas mean corpuscular volume (MCV) significantly increased in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Hyperbilirubinemia, hyperuricemia and hypoalbuminemia correlate with alcohol intake. Albumin / globulin ratio significantly decreased in ALD. In acute liver injury AST/ALT ratio is ≤ 1.0, whereas in alcoholic hepatitis it is always > 1.0. Moderately elevated level of ALP and high GGT values are good discriminator of alcoholic patients. Alcohol-induced liver injury is linked to oxidative stress as observed by decreased level of reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid, and increased level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. More »»

2005

Journal Article

P. Nayak, Das, S. K., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Biochemical Toxicity Study on Rat Brain upon Co-Exposure to Aluminium and Ethanol”, Journal of the Indian Society of Toxicology, vol. 1, pp. 13–17, 2005.

2005

Journal Article

S. K. Das, Nayak, P., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Consequences of ethanol consumption”, J Indian Soc Toxicol, vol. 1, pp. 1–10, 2005.[Abstract]


Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with increased incidence of a variety of illnesses. The precise mechanisms leading to alcohol related diseases are still imprecisely known. The metabolic effects of alcohol are due both to its direct action as well as to that of its first metabolite acetaldehyde, and can also be related to the changes in redox state. Ethanol increases the rate of generation of free radicals, decreases antioxidant levels, and potentiates oxidative stress. Cells are protected against oxidation by the action of certain enzymes, vitamins, and other substances, known collectively as antioxidants. More »»

2005

Journal Article

S. Das and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Influence of Thyroid Hormone on Brain development”, Thyroid Research and Practice, 2005.[Abstract]


Thyroid hormones are important regulator of brt=ain development during fetal and neonatl periods. Transient disruption of this hormone can impair brain development. The most severe neurologic impairment resulting from thyroid defeciency is endemic cretinism. While many importatnt aspects of brain development occur either before the time of fetal thyroid hormone synthesis or at ease before the synthesis of high levels of fetal hormone, maternal thyroid hormones might be important for brain development events. The majority of biological actions of thyroid hormone appear to be mediated by thyroid hormone receptors, which are ligand dependend transcription factors, Thyroid hormone controlled brain development is regulated by other intervening factors including other hormones, growth factors and transcription factors. Thyroid hormones of maternal orgin can selectively affect gene expression in the fetal brain development More »»

2005

Journal Article

S. Das, S.S, D., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Neuronal Connections and Thyroid Hormones”, Throid Research and Practise, 2005.[Abstract]


Thyroid hormones are important regulators of brain dewvelopment during the fetal and neonatal periods. They control neuronal and glial proliferation in definitive brain regions and regulate neuronal migration and differentiation, Differenrtiation includes the development of neuronal connectivity and myelination. Neural circuitries are extremely vulnurable to thyroid dysfunction More »»

2005

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “The concept of metabolism; a historical perspective (Lead article)”, Journal of Metabolism and Genetics, vol. 1, pp. 3-7, 2005.

2004

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Rao, A., “Never say ‘No’ to Coconut Oil”, Kerala Calling , pp. 6-9, 2004.[Abstract]


That the consumption of coconut oil result in elevated cholesterol levels is a myth. Coconut oil is equated with saturated fat without knowing that saturated fats in coconut oil are of the short chain and medium chain fatty acids. Recent researches show that the monolaurin found in coconut inhibits the viruses causing plaques in the arteries. Thus, ironically enough, avoiding coconut would only contribute to the increase of coronary heart disease. The major fat in mother’s milk is the same lauric acid as in coconut oil. If coconut oil is considered atherogenic and its use prohibited, then mother’s milk should also be considered so and prohibited too! Never say ‘No’ to Coconut Oil (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/216628212_Never_say_%27No%27_to_Coconut_Oil [accessed Apr 16, 2016]. More »»

2003

Journal Article

M. Pillay, Vidya, M., Rao, C. P., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “p53 expression in oral cancer: Observations of a South Indian study”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 22, pp. 447-451, 2003.[Abstract]


Oral cancers constitute a significant proportion of hospital admissions among cancer patients in India. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of tumour suppressor gene p53 in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma by immunohistochemistry. Though extensive studies on p53 alterations in oral cancers have been done in Western countries and some Asian countries, only a few studies have emerged from India, especially the Southern states. This study would therefore be helpful in providing an Indian perspective, with particular reference to South Indian states. A total of 110 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma, 35 dysplastic lesions, 15 hyperplastic lesions, and 50 samples of normal mucosa were assessed for p53 expression. Out of 110 cases of oral carcinoma, 40 (36%) were p53 positive. Among 35 cases of dysplastic lesions studied, 6(17%) showed p53 positive staining. None of the hyperplastic lesions and normal oral lesions showed any evidence of p53 positivity. However, in 9 out of 40 (23%) cases of positive infiltrating squamous cell carcinomas, the adjacent or overlying non-tumourous epithelium demonstrated focal areas of p53 positive staining in the basal and parabasal layers of the epithelium. In addition, in 7 out of 110 (6%) cases, cytoplasmic staining was observed. In these samples, nuclei were not stained. Our results indicate that p53 over-expression may be involved in only a certain proportion of oral carcinomas. The fact that 6% of the dysplastic lesions were p53 positive, and adjacent non-tumourous epithelium of 23% infiltrating squamous cell carcinomas showed positive staining for p53 in the progenitor compartment of the epithelium indicates that p53 immunoreactivity could be used to detect early tumours as well. More »»

2003

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Pereira, W. C., and Rao, M. S., “Secondary immunization inhibits drug induced apoptosis in vivo”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 18, pp. 161-168, 2003.[Abstract]


Immunization with a proper dose of an antigenic stimulus leads to cell proliferation and antibody response of circulating lymphocytes. We have previously observed that Secondary immunized spleenocytes resist ceramide-mediated apoptosis in vitro. Our present study is aimed at investigating the in vivo effect of immunization on apoptosis. Mice were subjected to either Primary or Secondary dose with Tetanus Toxoid. Unimmunized spleenocytes served as controls. Unimmunized, Primary and Secondary immunized mice were later exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs such as Etoposide/Methotrexate/Vincristine to induce apoptosis. Apoptosis was studied by using the Feulgen reaction on 5μ thin parafin sections of spleen. It was observed that Secondary immunized mice showed a lower percentage of apoptosis as compared to Primary or Unimmunized mice that was subjected to either of the chemotherapeutic drugs. It was thus concluded that Secondary immunization inhibits the process of chemotherapeutic drug induced apoptosis in vivo. More »»

2003

Journal Article

S. Upadhya, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Upadhya, S., “Tissue polypeptide specific antigen in the post therapeutic evaluation of patients with ovarian and colorectal cancer”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 18, pp. 46-51, 2003.[Abstract]


The study was designed to evaluate the significance of tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS) in patients with histologically proven ovarian and colorectal cancer following treatment along with CA125 (in ovarian cancer) and CEA (in colorectal cancer). Patients were grouped as follows: Group I: Patients with stable disease Group II: Patients with metastasis and relapse In patients with ovarian and colorectal cancer, the mean TPS levels were significantly higher in patients of group II compared to group I. The percentage of patients above cut-off levels for TPS were 17.4% in group I and 95.5% in group II. Similar results were observed with the mean levels of CA125. In colorectal cancer patients, the percentage of patients above cut-off levels for CEA and TPS were 70% and 30% in group I and 100% in group II for both the markers. Our observations indicate that TPS may be used as a common marker to indicate metastases in patients with ovarian and colorectal cancer. More »»

2003

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Das, S., “Biochemical parameters in Alcoholic Liver Injury in Sikkim”, Trends in Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine , pp. 227-233, 2003.[Abstract]


In Sikkim, nearly 35% of state population above the age of 21 years are chronic alcoholics. Forty five cases of alcoholics were studied to detect liver injury. Bilirubin, total protein, albumin, transaminases (AST and ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of serum were estimated in these subjects. In moderate alcohol consumption, GGT level, GPx and SOD activities are increased moderately. Mild increase in bilirubin, hypoalbuminemia and moderate increased in ALP were observed in chronic alcoholics. In chronic alcoholics GGT level remained very high, while GPx and SOD activity increased significantly. More »»

2002

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Silvia, C. R. W. D., and Prabhu, K. S., “Alteration of serum beta 2-microglobulin in oral carcinoma”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 17, pp. 104-107, 2002.[Abstract]


Serum β2-microglobulin (β2-m) levels were measured in oral carcinoma patients and compared with normal healthy controls. It was observed that there was a significant rise in serum β2- microglobulin in oral carcinoma patients. Progressively higher values were obtained as the cancer advanced clinically. Therefore the estimation of serum β2-microglobulin may be useful as one of a battery of tests in the assessment of oral carcinoma patients. More »»

2001

Journal Article

C. R. Wilma Delp Silvia, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Prabhu, K. S., “Evaluation of serum glycoproteins in oral carcinoma”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 16, pp. 113-115, 2001.[Abstract]


The present study was conducted on thirty untreated oral cancer patients proved by clinical and histopathological evidence and thirty healthy control subjects. The levels of glycoprotein-associated carbohydrates such as hexose, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid were found to be elevated significantly as compared to control subjects. There was a progressive rise in these markers as the stages of oral cancer advanced. More »»

2001

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Ballal, M., Deepa, S., Kedlaya, R., and , “Activity of Ocimum sanctum (the traditional Indian medicinal plant) against the enteric pathogens.”, Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 55, pp. 434-438, 472, 2001.[Abstract]


Aqueous & alcoholic extracts of O. sanctum were prepared. Two concentrations of these extracts (30 mg & 60 mg) were tried against the enteric pathogens & candida albicans by Agar diffusion method. Wide zones of inhibition were observed at 60 mg concentration of extract. Aqeous extract showed wider zone of inhibition when compared to alcoholic extract. Aqueous extract showed wider zones of inhibition for Klebisella, E. Coil, Proteus & Staphylococcus aureus. Alcoholic extract showed wider zone for vibrio cholerae. More »»

1998

Journal Article

N. Ananth, ,, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Souza, V. D., Rao, A. V., and Nambiar, D., “Enhancement of myeloperoxidase activity in wbcs in oral cancer patients treated with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) - A pilot study”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 13, pp. 126-128, 1998.[Abstract]


In a pilot study with five oral cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) three were given Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) as a protective agent to reduce the mucosal inflammation during radiotherapy. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme activity in WBC was quantitated. The three patients snowed a significant increase in the MPO activity when compared with two untreated controls indicating the efficacy of GM-CSF as a protective agent. It is suggested that further detailed studies with larger number of patients would be useful. More »»

1998

Journal Article

Tb Vijayakumar and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Viruses in human oral cancers”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 17, pp. 27-31, 1998.[Abstract]


The role of viruses in the etiology of human oral cancer is critically reviewed. Available evidences show a positive correlation for human oral cancer with human papilloma virus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human herpes virus type-6 (HHV-6), having strongest association with HPV. These viruses may act alone or in combination with other carcinogens in the genesis of head and neck malignancies. More »»

1997

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Virology and immunology of HIV infection”, Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprology, vol. 63, p. 153, 1997.

1997

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Coconut Oil and Health”, INDIAN COCONUT JOURNAL-COCHIN-, vol. 27, pp. 2–6, 1997.

1996

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effect of 5-fluorouracil treatment on IL-2R gene expression in gastric carcinoma patients”, Oncology Reports, vol. 3, pp. 223-225, 1996.[Abstract]


Interleukin-2R gene expression was evaluated in peripheral blood T lymphocytes of patients with gastric carcinoma and normal healthy controls. The presence of mRNA for IL-2Rα evaluated by Northern blot analysis revealed that unstimulated T cells expressed lower levels of IL-2R mRNA than PHA stimulated T cells. Expression of both IL-2Rα transcripts (3.5 and 1.5 kb) were either not detectable or only weakly detectable on T lymphocytes from patients even after mitogenic stimulation. In contrast, a significant rise in the expression of both IL-2Rα transcripts was observed on T cells from normal controls followed by mitogenic challenge. Enhanced expression of both IL-2R transcripts was also detected in a follow-up study of the patients, conducted one month following initial trial of chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5 Fu). Patients post chemotherapy were better responders of PHA stimulation as reflected by enhanced IL-2R gene expression following mitogenic challenge. More »»

1996

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Oncogenes and oncogenic viruses”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 11, pp. 3-6, 1996.

1996

Journal Article

S. Vivekanandhan, Chawla, T. C., Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Maheswari, M. C., “Immunochemical characterisation of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis H-37 Ra antigen”, Indian Medical Gazette , 1996.

1995

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Shanavas, K. R., and Elyas, K. K., “Purification and some properties of a lectin from the seeds of Trichosanthes anguina”, Biologia Plantarum, vol. 37, pp. 417-422, 1995.[Abstract]


A galactose-binding lectin was isolated in electrophoretically pure form from the seeds of the snake gourd, Trichosanthes anguina, by affinity chromatography on an immobilised lactose column, as well as on a cross-linked Guar Gum column. The lectin agglutinates native erythrocytes of human A, B and 0 phenotypes and of rabbit, rat and mouse. The molecular mass of the lectin, as estimated by Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography, is 49 kDa. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol, revealed two polypeptide chains linked by disulphide bonds in the lectin molecule. It contains no covalently linked sugars. Amino acid analysis of the lectin revealed a high content of acidic amino acids, relatively lower proportion of basic amino acids and traces of cysteine and methionine. The lectin has good thermal stability, and is inactivated when oxidised by metaperiodate. © 1995 Institute of Experimental Botany, ASCR. More »»

1995

Journal Article

K. Suresh, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Nirmala, K., and Jayavardhanan, K. K., “Direct correlation between IL-2-R gene transcription and natural cell mediated cytotoxicity in patients with gastric carcinoma”, Oncology Reports, vol. 2, pp. 481-485, 1995.[Abstract]


The relationship between IL-2-R gene transcription and natural cell mediated cytotoxicity (NKCMC) in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 15 patients with gastric carcinoma and 6 normal healthy controls were studied. NKCMC and ADCC assessed against radiolabelled K-562 and sensitized chicken RBC as respective target cells in 51Cr release assay revealed significant reduction in patients as compared to controls. The impairment in the natural cytotoxicity was associated with decreased IL-2-R gene expression at the mRNA level in these patients. Expression of both IL-2 R alpha transcripts (3.5 and 1.5 Kb) were either not detectable or only weakly detectable on T lymphocytes from patients even after mitogenic stimulation. In contrast, a significant rise in the expression of both IL-2 R alpha transcripts was observed on T cells from normal controls followed by mitogenic challenge. We interpret our findings to reflect the direct correlation between NKCMC and IL-2-R gene transcription in gastric carcinoma patients. More »»

1995

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Jayavardhanan, K. K., Suresh, K., Panikkar, K. R., and Ajayakumar, P. B., “Canavalia vivosa lectin and its tissue binding pattern in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 14, pp. 215-219, 1995.[Abstract]


A lectin belonging to the general group of mannose/glucose binding was isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using sephadex G-50 as its specific adsorbant. In order to establish a useful marker of malignancy of oral tissue, the binding sites of this Canavalia virosa lectin (CVL), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin-1 (BSA-1) were comparatively examined in surgical specimens from the benign and malignant lesions of oral cavity by lectin histochemistry method. The carcinomatous cells showed much more variable lectin binding towards CVL than normal controls which generally had uniform binding. But loss of receptor for PNA, ABA and BSA-1 was observed in poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma: the combination of these lectins may be regarded as a useful marker for the objective evaluation of dysplastic grading and to the early detection of histologic evidence of oral epithelial malignancy. More »»

1995

Journal Article

K. Suresh, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Jayavardhanan, K. K., “Defective interleukin - 2 r gene expression in gastric carcinoma patients”, Immunological Investigations, vol. 24, pp. 565-571, 1995.[Abstract]


Peripheral blood T lymphocytes from 15 patients with gastric carcinoma and 6 normal healthy controls were evaluated for Interleukin-2 R gene expression. Total RNA was extracted from T cell-enriched fractions of patients as well as from control peripheral blood lymphocytes, with or without mitogenic stimulation. The presence of mRNA for IL-2 R alpha evaluated by Northern blot analysis revealed that unstimulated T cells expressed lower levels of IL-2 R mRNA than PHA stimulated T cells. Expression of both IL-2 R alpha transcripts (3.5 and 1.5 Kb) were either not detectable or only weakly detectable on T lymphocytes from patients even after mitogenic stimulation. In contrast, a significant rise in the expression of both IL-2 R alpha transcripts was observed on T cells from normal controls followed by mitogenic challenge. This paper reports on the defective IL-2 R alpha gene expression in gastric carcinoma patients, which may explain one of the causes of immunodeficiency associated with neoplastic transformation and progression. © 1995 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. More »»

1995

Journal Article

K. Suresh, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Jayavardhanan, K. K., “Enhancement of natural cell mediated cytotoxicity in gastric carcinoma patients followed by 5-fluoro uracil treatment”, Biochemical Archives, vol. 11, pp. 27-34, 1995.

1994

Journal Article

K. K. Jayavardhanan, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Panikkar, K. R., and Suresh, K., “Modulatory potency of drum stick lectin on the host defense system”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 13, pp. 205-209, 1994.[Abstract]


The immunomodulatory effect of a glucosamine specific lectin from drum stick (Moringa oleifera) (MOL) on selected immunological parameters was studied in Balb/c mice. The effect of MOL on splenic lymphoid cells tested in vitro by (3H) thymidine incorporation assay revealed the mitogenic property of MOL towards lymphocytes even at low concentrations (9 to 15 μg/ml). Further, MOL was shown to exert its modulatory effect in vivo on immune profiles of tumor bearing mice as reflected on natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity (NKCMC) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These effects were assessed at various time points of tumor growth against radiolabelled YAC-1 cells and antibody coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as respective targets, in a short term 51Cr release assay. A single dose of MOL intraperitoneally resulted in a significant enhancement in NKCMC within 96 hrs. ADCC responses were seen to have peaks on days 9 and 17 following the lectin administration. More »»

1994

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Bhanumathi, P., and Saleesh, E. D., “WR-1065 as a chemoprotector in Adriamycin chemotherapy”, Cancer Letters, vol. 81, pp. 171-175, 1994.[Abstract]


The protective effect of WR-1065 against the side effects of Adriamycin was studied in tumor bearing mice. It has been noticed that WR-1065 pretreatment improved the Adriamycin toxicities such as increased enzyme levels, pathological lesions in lung, liver and heart and increased rate of lipid peroxidation, without reducing its anticancer property. © 1994.

More »»

1994

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Suresh, K., Jayavardhanan, K. K., Shyamsundar, K., and Kuttapan, C. S., “Natural killer cell and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in gastric carcinoma patients: Modulatory effects of IL-2 and 5-fluorouracil”, Oncology Reports, vol. 1, pp. 439-443, 1994.

1994

Journal Article

M. Schumacher, Yadav, M., Chandrashekran, A., Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Ablashi, D. V., Altman, D., Lausen, B., and Sauerbrei, W., “Frequent detection of human herpesvirus 6 in oral carcinoma”, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 86, pp. 1792-1794, 1994.

1993

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Shanavas, K. R., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Immunological phenomena in human oral carcinoma in India”, European Journal of Cancer. Part B: Oral Oncology, vol. 29, pp. 181-185, 1993.

1992

Journal Article

R. Kuttan, Kuttan, G., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Tumour reducing activity of an isolated active ingredient from mistletoe extract and its possible mechanism of action”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 11, pp. 7-12, 1992.

1992

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Thankamani, V., and Kumari, T. V., “Detection of herpes simplex virus type-2 DNA and human papilloma virus DNA sequences in cervical carcinoma tissue by molecular hybridization.”, Journal of experimental pathology, vol. 6, pp. 55-64, 1992.[Abstract]


Biopsy samples from one hundred and two patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix and tissues from twelve healthy normal cervical tissues (post hysterectomy) were examined for HSV-type 2 and HPV-11 DNA sequences by molecular hybridization technique. In the carcinoma tissue extracts 53% contained HSV-2 DNA, 27% -HSV-1-DNA and 36% showed HPV-11 gene sequences while 5.7% were found to contain both HPV and HSV-2 DNA. Biopsies from healthy cervix were completely negative for HSV-2 and HPV-11 DNA sequences. More »»

1992

Journal Article

M. Yadav, Shanavas, K. R., Kala, V., Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Vijayakumar, T., “Anti-HHV-6 antibodies in normal population and in cancer patients in India.”, Journal of experimental pathology, vol. 6, pp. 95-105, 1992.[Abstract]


The prevalence and titre of IgG antibodies to human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) were assayed in the serum samples from normal subjects and patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and oral cancer (OC) using immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques. This forms the first study on the sero-prevalence and titre of antibodies to HHV-6 in India. There was no considerable difference in the prevalence (76%) and titre (10-160) of the antibodies in normal population from those reported for normal adults in other parts of the world. All the HL and ALL patients studied showed no significant elevation in the antibody titre, though a slight increase in the prevalence (95%) was noted. Antibody titre and prevalence were found highly elevated in OC. OC remained totally unstudied for the presence of anti-HHV-6 antibodies, and this is the first report of elevated levels of the antibody in this cancer. The role of HHV-6, if any, in the pathogenesis of OC is worth investigating. More »»

1992

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Thankamani, V., and Kumari, T. V., “Papilloma virus in cervical carcinoma: detection of viral antigen in cancer cells.”, Journal of experimental pathology, vol. 6, pp. 41-53, 1992.[Abstract]


Paraffin sections of biopsies from histopathologically confirmed cases of uterine cervical carcinoma, cervical scrapings from dysplasia, chronic cervicitis, tumour cells from carcinoma of the oral cavity and normal tissues from healthy normal cervix and oral cavity scrapings were examined for the presence of Human papilloma virus antigens. The techniques adopted were the Indirect Immunofluorescence Stainig and the Peroxide-Anti-Peroxidase techniques. The HPV-antigen was present in 38 percent and 41 percent of invasive carcinoma cervix, by PAP and IIF methods respectively. In cervical dysplasia 8-13% revealed HPV antigen while oral carcinoma cells and normal tissue samples were totally negative. More »»

1992

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Creatine Kinase and Cardiotoxicity in Adriamycin Chemotherapy and its Modification by WR-1065”, Biochemical Archieves, vol. 8, pp. 335-338, 1992.[Abstract]


The effect of adriamycin(ADR) chemotherapy on cratinine phosphokinase (CPK) and pathological lesions in heart was studied with Balb/c mice. WR-1065 was used as a chemoprotector against the cardiotoxicity of ADR. CPK levels were measured at different intervals and the heart of treated animals were analyzed for pathological changes. The results indicate that there is a significant relationship between the CPK levels and pathological lesions. WR-1065 could reduce tge cardiotoxicity induced by ADR, without altering its antineoplastic activity More »»

1992

Journal Article

P. Bhanumathi, Saleesh, E. B., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Creatinine phosphokinase and cardiotoxicity in adriamycin chemotherapy and its modification by WR-1065”, Biochemical archives, vol. 8, pp. 335–338, 1992.

1991

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Raghunath, P. N., Shanavas, K. R., Vijayakumar, T., and Antony, A., “Detection of HSV1 DNA segments in human oral cancer biopsies by dot-blot and in-situ DNA hybridisation techniques”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 10, pp. 291-294, 1991.

1991

Journal Article

K. Suresh and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Kinetics of NK cell activity during tumor development in a mouse model”, Cancer Journal, vol. 4, pp. 97-102, 1991.[Abstract]


We have previously reported the profiles of natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity (NKC/MC) in the spleen cells of tumor bearing Balb/c mice during the development of Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) tumor, a murine T cell lymphoma. In the present paper we have used two different methods of assessing NK cytotoxicity in vitro to dissect the relative importance of various steps involved in attaining the overall result. The 51Cr release assay has been combined with a recently established single cell conjugate assay using poly-L-lysine coated coverslips to allow better quantitative analysis. With this double procedure we could estimate the percentage of active killer cells, V(max) and recycling capacity of the effector cells at different intervals of tumor progression. A large granular lymphocyte (LGL) enriched population obtained by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation of Percoll was used as effector cells against the murine NK susceptible target YAC-1 in both assays. Also, the ability of the effector cells to release natural killer cytotoxic factor (NKCF), on stimulation with YAC-1 cells was estimated in a micro-supernatant assay of 48 h. A significant enhancement in the number of active killer cells coupled with increased NKCF production was observed on day 7 and day 12 after tumor inoculation with respect to normal control. A decline in NKCWC observed at the advanced stage of tumor growth (day 19) was found to be associated with diminished NKCF production as well as a reduced number of active killer cells among the effector cell population. Estimated maximal recycling capacity showed minimal differences at different phases of tumor growth. Pretreatment of day-19 effector cells with 200 IU/ml of human recombinant IL-2 resulted in augmentation of NKCMC, V(max), percentage active killer cells, and NKCF production. More »»

1990

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Rajendran, R., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Serum levels of iron and proteins in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF).”, Annals of dentistry, vol. 49, pp. 23-25, 45, 1990.[Abstract]


Serum proteins, serum iron and total iron binding capacity were estimated in 50 patients with oral submucous fibrosis and 50 patients with oral leukoplakia. The values were compared with that of 50 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant depression in hemoglobin and serum iron was observed in both groups of patients, whereas total iron binding capacity showed significant change only in the oral submucous fibrosis patients. Serum protein values were significantly lower in all the patients. The role of iron deficiency anemia in the causation of this premalignant lesion is discussed. More »»

1990

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Remani, P., Joy, A., Vijayan, K. K., Ravindran, A., Beevi, V. M. H., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Jack Fruit lectin binding pattern in carcinoma of the uterine cervix”, Journal of Experimental Pathology, vol. 5, pp. 89-96, 1990.

1990

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Rajendran, R., Remani, P., and Vijayakumar, T., “Total hemolytic complement (CH50) and its fractions (C3 and C4) in the sera of patients with premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity.”, Annals of dentistry, vol. 49, pp. 36-38, 51, 1990.[Abstract]


Total hemolytic complement (CH50) and its fractions (C3 and C4) were estimated in the sera of 50 patients with oral leukoplakia, 50 patients with oral submucous fibrosis and 50 oral cancer patients. The values were compared with that of 50 normal controls. No significant alterations in the values of CH50, C3 or C4 were observed in the sera of patients with either leukoplakia or oral submucous fibrosis whereas the values were found to be altered significantly in oral cancer (P less than 0.001). In the case of oral submucous fibrosis the mean complement levels were slightly lower than those of normal controls and leukoplakia. Age and sex had no influence either on the total complement activity or its fractions (C3 and C4). The serum complement levels may be useful as a biological marker for the early detection of tissue dysplasia. More »»

1990

Journal Article

R. Kuttan, Kuttan, G., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Effect of a preparation from Viscum album on tumor development in vitro and in mice”, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 29, pp. 35-41, 1990.[Abstract]


The effect of Iscador, a commercial preparation made from Viscum album was studied on several cell lines using in vitro tissue culture as well as tumor-bearing animals. Iscador was found to be cytotoxic to animal tumor cells such as Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells (DLA cells) and Ehrlich ascites cells in vitro and inhibited the growth of lung fibroblasts (LB cells), Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells) and human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (KB cells) at very low concentrations. Moreover, administration of Iscador was found to reduce ascites tumours and solid tumours produced by DLA cells and Ehrlich ascites cells. The effect of the drug could be seen when the drug was given either simultaneously, after tumour development or when given prophylactically, indicating a mechanism of action very different from other chemotherapeutic drugs. Iscador was not found to be cytotoxic to lymphocytes. © 1990. More »»

1990

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Ravindran, A., Vijayakumar, T., Sudha, L., Remani, P., Nair, M. K., and Stephen, J., “Chromosome abnormalities in squamous cell carcinoma of the human oral cavity”, Neoplasma, vol. 37, pp. 191-198, 1990.[Abstract]


Cytogenetic studies carried out in tissues of 75 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity gave satisfactory results in 12 cases. Remarkable variation characterized the modal chromosome numbers of these tumors, ranging from marked hypodiploidy to tetraploidy. Chromosomes which were lost belonged to group A whereas chromosomes which were gained belonged to groups C, D, E, F and G. Marker chromosomes were present in three cases. There was no correlation between the chromosome abnormalities observed and the clinical stages of the disease. The pattern of chromosome abnormalities ranging from marked hypodiploidy to tetraploidy observed in oral cancer tissues suggests an association of DNA oncogenic virus possibly Herpes simplex virus Type I (HSV-1) with oral cancer. More »»

1990

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Suresh, K., and Nirmala, K., “Adoptive immunotherapy using human recombinant interleukin-2 activated specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes”, Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 9, pp. 155-160, 1990.

1989

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Rajendran, R., Sugathan, C. K., Augustine, J., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Ackerman's tumour (Verrucous carcinoma) of the oral cavity: a histopathologic study of 426 cases.”, Singapore dental journal, vol. 14, pp. 48-53, 1989.[Abstract]


Salient histopathological features of four hundred and twenty six (426) cases of verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity reported jointly by the Department of Oral Pathology, Dental College and Department of Pathology, Medical College, Trivandrum, during the period from January 1975 to December 1984 were evaluated. They constituted 5.27% of 7,988 primary malignant neoplasms of the oral cavity detected during the period. Locally aggressive behaviour with bone, muscle and salivary gland invasion occurred in 53% of cases. Examination of the neighbouring areas of the lesion, which showed some light on the natural evolution of the disease, is described. The gradual transformation of a hyperplastic verrucous lesion into carcinoma is appraised. Evidence suggestive of a distant metastatic spread of the tumour could not be detected. More »»

1989

Journal Article

K. Suresh, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Kuruvilla, K., and Nirmala, K., “Assessment of immunological parameters during tumour development in a murine model.”, Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 27, pp. 497-501, 1989.[Abstract]


Natural Killer activity assessed by 51Cr release assay from K-562 cells showed detectable activity from 5th day after tumour transplantation, reaching a peak on 12th day and thereafter showing a gradual decline in the activity. Antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity estimated by 51Cr labelled sheep red blood cells anti SRBC system demonstrated a peak activity on 5th day. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity detected by 51Cr release of Dalton's lymphoma ascites target cells showed a peak on 10th day. Antibody complement mediated cytotoxicity revealed a similar pattern as natural killer cell activity. More »»

1989

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Rajendran, R., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “An alternative pathogenetic pathway for oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF)”, Medical Hypotheses, vol. 30, pp. 35-37, 1989.[Abstract]


Oral submucous fibrosis is a potent pre-cancerous condition which occurs almost exclusively in Indians but cases have been reported from several countries. The definite aetiology of OSMF is still unknown and there is no known treatment for it. Chillies, tobacco use, vitamin deficiencies and betel quid chewing have been implicated. Ramanathan is of the view that OSMF seems to be the Asian version of sideropenic dysphagia. He suggests that OSMF appears to be an altered oral mucosa following a prolonged period of chronic deficiency of iron and/or vitamin "B" complex especially folic acid. This changed state of the oral mucosa subsequently appears to develop more easily a hypersensitivity to oral irritants such as spices especially chillies and to the betel quid. We hold that the hypersensitivity caused by local irritants and the resultant persistant juxta epithelial inflammatory response noted in OSMF (in a host system already primed by an intrinsic genetic defect) act as the initiating factor leading to a defective inflammatory - reparative response, culminating in fibrotic healing. The role of iron and "B" complex together with others may be contributory (promotor) to this pre-existing pathologic response of the lamina propria. © 1989. More »»

1989

Journal Article

R. Kuttan, Kuttan, G., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Presence of a receptor for the active component of iscador in ascites fluid of tumour bearing mice”, Cancer Letters, vol. 48, pp. 223-227, 1989.[Abstract]


Tumour bearing mice exhibit a specific "receptor" in the ascites fluid which binds with the active component isolated from Iscador. This "receptor" was found to be a protein which inhibited the cytotoxicity of Iscador and its isolated active component at low concentration. The receptor protein was also found in the sonicates of tumour cells which are susceptible to the action of Iscador but not in lymphocytes which were not susceptible to Iscador or its isolated active component. The receptor was separated on a Sephadex G-50 column. Activity was lost upon heat denaturation and dialysis. © 1989. More »»

1989

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Remani, P., Augustine, J., Vijayan, K. K., Ankathil, R., Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and M Nair, K., “Jack fruit lectin binding pattern in benign and malignant lesions of the breast”, In Vivo, vol. 3, pp. 275-278, 1989.[Abstract]


N-acetyl D-galactosamine specific lectin was isolated from Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and conjugated to horse radish peroxidase type VI. The purified conjugate was used for the study of tissue binding properties on benign and malignant lesions of the breast using diaminobenzidine as substrate on dewaxed tissue sections. Forty mammary carcinomas, 10 cystic hyperplasias of the breast and 10 normal breast tissues were used for the study. Neoplastic cells showed increased affinity for the study. The lectin binding was focally strong in neoplastic cells compared to the normal as well as the hyperplastic tissues. The stroma of the cancer tissues showed an intense strong binding where elastosis was present. The use of the lectin as a histochemical reagent is discussed. More »»

1989

Journal Article

R. Rajendran, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Vijayakumar, T., “Serum levels of iron and proteins in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF).”, Annals of dentistry, vol. 49, pp. 23–5, 1989.

1988

Journal Article

G. Kuttan, Kuttan, R., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Isolation and identification of a tumour reducing component from mistletoe extract (Iscador)”, Cancer Letters, vol. 41, pp. 307-314, 1988.[Abstract]


Using a combination of gel filtration and paper chromatography, a tumour reducing component from mistletoe extract (Iscador) was isolated and identified to be a peptide of approximate molecular weight 5000. The isolated peptide reduced the solid tumour induced by Dalton's lymphoma ascites tumour cells (DLA cells) in mice. The isolated component was very cytotoxic to the DLA cells but was not cytotoxic to normal lymphocytes, indicating a cell dependent specificity. © 1988. More »»

1988

Journal Article

K. NIRLVIALA, KU'I'I‘AN, K., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “ANTITUMOUR ACTIVITY OF LIPOSOMAL ENCAPSULATED TIAZOFURIN AND ITS NAB-ANALOGUE”, Indian journal of cancer, 1988.

1988

Journal Article

K. Suresh, Nirmala, K., M Sr, K. Donata, and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Preliminary studies on the immunopotentiating action of some Ayurvedic preparations”, Ancient science of life, vol. 8, p. 41, 1988.[Abstract]


Ten healthy controls, 9 Rheumatoid Arthritis patients and 5 cancer patients were studied for T and B cells in peripheral circulation. T cell count in cancer patients showed a slight enhancement after receiving Ayurvedic Treatment; but the B cell count remained the same. In Rheumatoid Arthritis patients no significant change was noticed either in T cell or cell count. More »»

1987

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Raghunath, P. N., Josph, C. D., and Sudheeran, P. C., “Evaluation of three antigen non-specific methods for detecting circulating immune complexes in oral cancer”, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 2, pp. 85-89, 1987.

1987

Journal Article

V. Thankamani and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Serum Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 in Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix”, Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology, 1987.

1987

Journal Article

P. N. Raghunath, Joseph, C. D., Sudheeran, P. C., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “DEMONSTRATION OF CIRCULATING IMMUNE-COMPLEXES IN ORAL AND CERVICAL-CANCER PATIENTS”, JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL & CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH, vol. 6, pp. 173–178, 1987.

1986

Journal Article

P. Remani, Ankathil, R., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Circulating Immune Complex as a Biological Marker for Solid Tumours”, Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, 1986.

1986

Journal Article

A. Ravindran, Remani, P., Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Vijayakumar, T., “Quantitation of tissue immunoglobulins in premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity”, Cancer journal (Villejuif), vol. 1, pp. 135–136, 1986.

1984

Journal Article

T. Vijayakumar, Sasidharan, M. S. G. V. K., Ankathil, R., Remani, P., Kumari, T. V., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Incidence Of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg)”, Indian journal of cancer, vol. 21, pp. 7–10, 1984.

1984

Journal Article

B. Prabha and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Leucocyte adherence inhibition assay (LAI) in cancer of the oral cavity”, European Journal of Cancer and Clinical Oncology, vol. 20, pp. 891–897, 1984.[Abstract]


Antitumor immunity to oral cancer was assessed in 46 patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity using a leucocyte adherence inhibition assay (LAI). The response shown by the leucocytes of oral cancer patients to the oral cancer antigen was compared to that shown by the leucocytes from 10 normal age- and sex-matched healthy controls and 43 patients suffering from other types of cancers. Seventy-six percent of the oral cancer patients showed a high degree of leucocyte adherence inhibition in the presence of the antigen. The specificity of this test was further assessed using combinations of the leucocytes from oral cancer patients with extracts from seven cancers occurring at various other sites and extracts of normal oral tissue. The test was highly specific and the leucocytes of oral cancer patients showed significant inhibition only in the presence of oral cancer extract. The inhibition was between 0 and 30% with most other cancer extracts except in the case of extract from cancer of the cervix, where 410 patients showed above 30% inhibition. Specific blocking of the LAI response was observed on addition of sera from oral cancer patients to leucocyte-antigen mixtures from oral cancer patients. This effect was not observed on addition of these sera to specific leucocyte-antigen mixtures from other cancer patients. These observations point towards the usefulness of this test in monitoring antitumor immunity in oral cancer patients. More »»

1984

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Kumar, S., George, M. C., Raghunath, P. N., Joseph, C. D., and Sudheeran, P. C., “Changes in Immunoglobulins and Leucocyte Counts in Cancer Patients in relation to Radiotherapy”, Indian Journal of Haematology, p. 01/1984, 1984.

1983

Journal Article

M. Abdulkader, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Leena, D. K. R., and Nair, V. J., “Experimental production of keloids.”, Indian journal of cancer, vol. 20, p. 27, 1983.

1983

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Kumar, S., and Devi, P. Uma, “Radioprotective effect of MPG on the Peripheral Blood of Mammals; a review”, Journal of Haematology , 1983.

1981

Journal Article

R. Ankathil and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Demonstration of a tumour associated antigen in human oral cancers.”, The Indian Journal of Medical Research, 1981.

1974

Journal Article

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, K Brunner, T., and Cerottini, J. - C., “Detection of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the EL4 mouse leukemia system: increased activity of immune spleen and peritoneal cells following preincubation and cell fractionation procedures”, International Journal of Cancer, vol. 14, pp. 301–313, 1974.[Abstract]


The cytotoxic activity of spleen and peritoneal cells from C57Bl/6 mice immunized with irradiated syngeneic EL4 leukemia cells was tested in vitro on 51Cr labelled target cells following various fractionation and purification procedures. At the peak of the response, immune spleen cells showed very low cytotoxic activities. Fractionation on a simple BSA density gradient yielded a low-density (less than 1.08 g/cm3) spleen-cell population with a five- to 10-fold increased cytotoxic activity. A similar increase was observed after preincubation of immune spleen cells for 24 h at 37° C, confirming results of Ortiz de Landazuri and Herberman (1972). A successive application of preincubation followed by BSA gradient separation resulted in a cumulative 30- to 100-fold increase in cytotoxicity. Removal of high-density small lymphocytes before preincubation led to populations with considerably decreased activity, suggesting the formation of low-density cytotoxic lymphocytes from high-density precursors during preincubation. Immune peritoneal cells showed a three- to five-fold increase in cytotoxicity after (1) removal of phagocytic cells, (2) 24 h preincubation followed by removal of adherent cells, and (3) removal of phagocytic cells followed by preincubation. This indicated that adherent cells were not involved in but appeared to inhibit the cytotoxic activity of immune peritoneal cells. Treatment of preincubated or gradient-separated immune spleen and peritoneal cells with anti-θ serum and complement and passage through Sephadex lg-anti-Ig columns demonstrated the T-cell nature of the cytotoxic effector cells. In vitro studies also showed an enhanced protective effect of pretreated immune spleen cells when compared to the original population. More »»

Publication Type: Book

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2012

Book

K. Vaidyanathan, Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, and Narayanan, M. P., Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Brain Involvement-5 Years Experience from a Tertiary Care Center in South India. INTECH Open Access Publisher, 2012, p. 21.[Abstract]


Introduction Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) comprise a large group of more than 500 different rare genetic disorders. They arise due to mutations in genes encoding a single enzyme in metabolic pathways. Some of these disorders are very rare, whereas certain other disorders are more common. There are considerable racial and ethnic differences in the incidence pattern of these disorders. Amino acidurias like phenylketonuria are common in the Western population; in Asian countries including India, organic acidurias like propionic acidurias, methyl malonic acidurias and maple syrup urine disease are more common. Clinical presentation of IEM is varied and it affects multiple organ systems, including CNS. Indeed CNS involvement is one of the most common presenting symptoms. The diseases can appear immediately after birth; or sometimes it may be delayed, even appearing in adult life. In this chapter we shall describe our experience with metabolic screening in the last 5 years. This is followed by a presentation of some important case histories along with their laboratory work-up. We then go on to discuss the current global status in diagnosis and management of these diseases. It should be emphasized at the beginning itself that our laboratory (Metabolic Disorders Laboratory, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Kochi, Kerala, S. India) is a referral center for the state of Kerala as well as the neighboring states in South India. Hence the studied population represents children who are suspected to have IEM or are high-risk individuals, or who have been referred from other hospitals in this part of India. Hence the results described do not reflect the population incidence. If these patients are not diagnosed and treated early in life, they go on to have irreversible damage. Many body systems are affected, and the predominant damage will be to the central nervous system. The babies may develop permanent mental retardation, growth retardation, intractable seizures, cerebral palsy etc. More »»

2010

Book

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Sreekumari, S., Vaidyanathan, K., and Damodaran, G., Clinical Chemistry Made Easy. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, New Delhi, 2010.

2007

Book

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Sreekumari, S., Biochemistry: JP’s Gold Standard Mini Atlas Series, 1st ed. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, New Delhi, 2007.

2006

Book

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan and Das, S., Practical Textbook for MBBS Students, 1st ed. Jaypee Brothers Medicall Publishers, New Delhi, 2006.

1975

Book

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Brunner, K. T., Plata, F., and Cerottini, J. - C., Lymphocyte mediated Cytotoxicity, Mechanisms and Relationship to immunity. University of Tokyo, Editors: D.Mizuno, 1975.

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2009

Conference Paper

N. M. P, Vaidyanathan, K., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “NEUROMETABOLIC DISORDERS IN CHILDREN”, in INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NEUROSCIENCE UPDATES ISN, APSN, IBRO & SNCI, 2009.[Abstract]


 

Background

Neurometabolic disorders are transmitted as autosomal recessive traits. The most prevalent symptoms were delayed development, mental retardation,lethargy, seizures, poor feeding, and failure to thrive.Positive family history and consanguinity are important predisposing factors

Objectives

  1. Diagnosis of neurometabolic disorders in 570 patien ts with signs and symptoms.
  2. Quantification of amino acids and organic acids by HPLC

Methodology

570 children (upper age limit 12 years) having symptoms suggestive of Neurometabolic Disorders were selected from Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre during January 2008 to Sept ember 2009. Manual screening tests and TLC were used to detect the presence of abnormal metabolites in urine. HPLC was done for amino acids and organic acids using standard protocols. CT/MRI were used to evaluate brain abnormalities.

Results

Out of the 570 patients screened, 48 cases were positive.15 cases of Methylmalonic aciduria, and in 16 cases of propionic aciduria, 12 cases of Maple syrup urine disease, 2 cases of alkaptonuria, 2 cases of Nonke
totichyperglycinemia and one case of isovaleric aciduria were found. Commom signsand symptoms were seizures (N=12), delayed milestones (N=12), poor feeding(N=29), Lethargy (N= 4), metabolic acidosis (N= 42), an
d mental retardation(N=12). 15 patients expired during the study. Brain abnormalities were detected in 11 patients.Conclusion Methylmalonic aciduria, Propionic aciduria and maple syrup urine disease accounted for 90% of neurometabolic disorders detected. Prompt diagnosis allowed specific treatment in majority of these patients with rapid improvement.

 

Conclusion

Methylmalonic aciduria, Propionic aciduria and maple syrup urine disease accounted for 90% of neurometabolic disorders detected. Prompt diagnosis allowed specific treatment in majority of these patients with rapid improvement.

 

More »»

2008

Conference Paper

S. K. Das, Mukherjee, S., Pandey, G., Varadhan, S., Dhanya, L., Balakrishnan, V., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Role of cytokines and insulin resistance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease”, in CLINICAL CHEMISTRY, 2008.

2008

Conference Paper

N. M. P, Vaidyanathan, K., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “DIAGNOSIS OF NEUROMETABOLIC DISORDERS BY SIMPLE SCREENING TEST AND HPLC.”, in NBNI 2008 (10 th CHINA-INDIA-JAPAN-KOREA JOINED WORKSHOP ON NEUROBIOLOGY AND NEUROINFORMATICS, 2008.[Abstract]


DIAGNOSIS OF NEUROMETABOLIC DISORDRS IN CHILDREN BY SIMPLE SCREENING TESTS AND HPLC M.P.Narayanan, Kannan Vaidyanathan, D.M. Vasudevan Dept. of Biochemistry, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, AIMS- Ponekkara (PO) Cochin-682041, Kerala, India. AIM: - To diagnose the Neurometabolic Disorders in children. METHOD: - Patients from Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre are selected from 03.01.2008 to 02.10.2008. Study in 150 children (upper age limit 12 years) both males and females having symptoms suggestive of Neurometabolic Disorders (These include metabolic acidosis, increased anion gap, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, ketosis, ketonuria,lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, abnormal hemogram, seizures, poor feeding, lethargy, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly)Patients who proved to have sepsis and other disorders of childhood will be excluded from the study even Neurometabolic Disorders are detected. Neurometabolic screening and TLC: - Manual screening tests (Rothera’s test, DNPH test, Ferric Chloride test, Ninhydrin test, Benedict’s test, glucose oxidase test, test for homogentisic acid) are used to detect the presence of abnormal metabolites in urine. Abnormal excretion of amino acids and organic acids in urine was detected by TLC. HPLC Analysis of urine Organic acids: - Deproteinised and desalted urine samples are subjected to HPLC quantification by Diode Array Detector. RESULTS: -150 urine samples are subjected for NeuroMetabolic Screening. Out of these 5.3%( N = 8) patients were from consanguinous families. Commom signs and symptoms were Seizures and delayed milestones (N=77), poor feeding (N=16), Lethargy (N= 11), metabolic acidosis (N= 9). 5 patients were expired during the study. Out of the 150 urine samples screened 40 samples were found +ve for Organic acids. They were further subjected to HPLC quantification. In 21 cases beta hydroxy butyric acid was higher than the normal limits. In 15 patients Methylmalonic acid level was higher (Methylmalonic aciduria), and in 16 patients the level of propionic acid was higher (Propionic aciduria). Molecular genetic study and enzyme assay are required for confirmation of the disease. DISCUSSION: -For evaluating a sick infant the first step is a through clinical examination including family history. Neurometabolic disorders are transmitted as autosomal recessive traits. The signs and symptoms observed was similar to that reported in literature. The most prevalent symptoms were delayed development, mental retardation lethargy. In the present study seizures, regression of milestones, poor feeding, failure to thrive were most common findings. Positive family history and consanguinity are important factors in predisposing neurometabolic disorders. More »»

2007

Conference Paper

S. Das, Balakrishnan, V., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Utility of serum hydroxyproline, Type IV collagen and AST to platelet ratio index (APRI) in the prediction of liver damage”, in 9th Annual Meeting of the American-Association-for-Clinical-Chemistry, 2007.

2006

Conference Paper

S. K. Das, Balakrishnan, V., and Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, “Biochemical markers of degree of liver fibrosis: Predictor of degree of liver damage”, in CLINICAL CHEMISTRY, 2006.

Publication Type: Website

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

1994

Website

Dr. Damodaran Vasudevan, Saleesh, E. B., and Bhanumathi, P., “Modification of adriamycine/cyclophosphamide induced immune suppression by an aminothiol”, Biochemical Archives, vol. 10. pp. 111-116, 1994.

207
PROGRAMS
OFFERED
5
AMRITA
CAMPUSES
15
CONSTITUENT
SCHOOLS
A
GRADE BY
NAAC, MHRD
8th
RANK(INDIA):
NIRF 2018
150+
INTERNATIONAL
PARTNERS