Publications

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Journal Article

Aswathy Das K V. and MV, K., “Exploring Individuality and Processing Fear in Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 6, no. 6, p. 11, 2018.[Abstract]


This paper discusses Katherine Paterson’s novel “Bridge to Terabithia” as a manifesto used to promote the idea of individuality and uniqueness of a person. Through this work, Paterson has brought in elements to establish this as a safe way through which children could process their individual fears in the society. Individuality is something that is growing fainter in a world erected upon strict social traditionalism. This paper puts forward aspects from the book that emphasizes bringing out the true individual in a person, to enjoy the proper manner of life. This paper argues about the limitations put upon an individual as a result of social conformities and at the same time it talks about the way in which this book could be regarded as a fine piece of literature for children to process the realities of life without engaging in them.

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2018

Journal Article

Aswathy Das K V., P, V., and S, A. P., “Dynamics of Religion and Spirituality: A Post-Oriental Reading of William Dalrymple’s Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 6, no. 6, 2018.

2018

Journal Article

Anusudha R. S., “Mapping The Illustration of Lord Siva as a Heroic Tamil King and God in Appar's Hymns”, Literary Endeavour , vol. IX, no. 4, pp. 292-296, 2018.[Abstract]


Appar Tirunavukkarasar Nayanar was one of the four Saivite spiritual teachers wvho succeeded in conjuring up a tangible or substantial image of Siva in the devotee's mind through poetry.

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2018

Journal Article

R. Pillai and Anusudha R. S., “Rarity into Reality- An amalgamation of Two Contrasting Literary Ages in Mo Yan’s Frog”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 6, no. 7, 2018.[Abstract]


This research paper proposes an in-depth study of the Chinese writer Mo Yan’s novel Frog (2009) and analyzes how the protagonist Gugu befits as an exponent of Romantic tendencies in the modernist novel. The concepts taken into consideration include Byronic hero, subjective approach, rebelliousness and heroism. The concept of Byronic hero introduced by the Romantic, George Gordon Byron, still mirrors in modern literary compositions. Along with it, traces of a heroic, rebellious central character, presented in a subjective outlook within the backdrop of the one-child policy, leaves behind the legacy of Romanticism in this piece of art. Thus the novel reflects the concoction of romantic and modern elements and how the amalgamation of two ages of English literary history results in the creation of a unique literary work.

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2018

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran and Mohan, A., “Dysfunctional Family in Christina Stead’s The Man Who Loved Children”, Pramana, vol. 8, no. 12, 2018.

2018

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran, Krishnakumar, S., and S, H., “Emotional and Psychological Trauma: a Study of Yejide Kilanko’s Daughters Who Walk This Path”, CIKITUSI Journal for Multidisciplinary Research, vol. 5, no. 12, 2018.[Abstract]


Literature is the reflection of the life in all its varied forms and shapes. Literature is the mirror to life and society. Literature shows how the idea of memories holding the emotional thread to relate the human experiences in different ways. It represents the social, political, cultural and historical growth of society at a great length. Commonwealth Literature is a vast term which defines English Language works written in the formal British colony or places which had the status of dominions. Nigerian literature is begin with the oral tradition, pioneered by the unsung heroes of her literary past like warriors, story tellers, priests and many others. Yejide Kilanko’s debut novel Daughters Who Walk This Path tells the life story of Morayo, a small, determined girl growing in the city of Ibadan. The happiness in her life is changed by the arrival of her older male cousin, Bros T. He comes to love with her family and begins to sexually molest her. She painfully suppresses Bros T’s sexual violence from everyone. At last she broke her silence to the parents but they didn’t support her and later she turns for aunt Morenike and she has given all the support and understanding to Morayo than her parents. Morenike’s story is told along with Morayo’s. By the time Morayo reaches university, there she reacquainted with her first love, kachi. . Later she got job in Bank Lagos and in there she comes face to face with Bros T and it led to trauma. In the end she gets support from her family to overcome the trauma.

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2017

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B. and Sasankan, J., “From Fear to Fearlessness: A Thematic Analysis of Shashi Deshpande’s The Dark Holds No Terror in the International Journal of Language”, International Journal of Language, Literature in Humanities, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 129-133, 2017.[Abstract]


Shashi Deshpande (b.1938) has been publishing her novels since 1980. They explore woman’s quest for her identity. Her characters are middle class educated women who resort to silence and are denied the freedom to exercise their free will. Women, albeit endowed with immense potential make little use of it, when compelled to lead a life by stringent patriarchal norms. With no voice of their own, women are expected to carry out the role of a submissive wife, isolating themselves like a cocoon. Even if she becomes a success in her profession, she is not treated on par with her husband as he wants her to be one step below him and thus she becomes a victim of her husband’s inferiority complex. The article attempts to analyse the problems faced by Sarita and how she succeeds in coming out of this in Shashi Deshpande’s The Dark Holds No Terror.

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2017

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B. and S, A. P., “Journey of Revelation: The Quest Motif in Jaishree Misra’s Ancient Promises”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature (RJELAL) , vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 690-694, 2017.[Abstract]


Jaishree Misra’s novel Ancient Promises throws light on the struggle undergone by women in the present day society. This novel discusses the plight of Janaki, who unwillingly agrees to fulfil the wishes of her parents. Forced to forget her first lover, compelled to marry another man of her parents’ choice, she becomes the mother of a baby girl, Riya. But fate plays rather a cruel game with her when Riya turns out to be mentally handicapped. This novel traces the trajectory of her growth as an individual who faces many problems with a strong mind. The story of Janaki is a message to the society. This paper examines the quest motif of the central character.

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PDF iconJourney-of-Revelation-The Quest-Motif-in-Jaishree-Misras-Ancient-Promises.pdf

2017

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B. and S, S., “Ecofeminism in Nandini Sahu’s Sita (A Poem)”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature (RJELAL) an International Journal open access print and online, indexed, peer reviewed, UGC Approved Journal and refereed Journal, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. p.791-795, 2017.

2017

Journal Article

Beena S. Nair, “Ravanayana: Negotiating the Political and Cultural Discourse of the Vanquished in Anand Neelakantan's Asura Tale of the Vanquished : The Story of Vanquished : TheStory of Ravana and his People(2012)”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 5, p. 15, 2017.[Abstract]


Asura: Tale of the Vanquished the story of Ravana and his people (2012), by Anand Neelakantan, is an attempt to deconstruct and reconstruct the myth of The Ramayana. In the epic, The Ramayana, Rama is portrayed as the personification of good and Ravana is considered evil. This novel brings out a different perspective to the familiar epic, The Ramayana, by narrating the story from the point of view of Ravana. The analysis focuses mainly on Ravana as an ideal father to his daughter Sita. The cultural identity of the Asura Ravana is re-written by Anand Neelakantan using the epic The Ramayana. This paper attempts to study the rewriting of the epic Ramayana, in the contemporary postcolonial context of writing back to the centre- and to debate on the identity of Ravana, the anti-hero. This paper explores Ravana as a subaltern and also the dual identity of subaltern and re- assessment of native cultural identity. The purpose of the paper is to analyse the complexities of Ravana’s political and cultural identity and to initiate a new discourse on subaltern by raising the issues of the dual identity of Ravana.

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2017

Journal Article

Beena S. Nair, “The Rise of New Generation Rhapsody: Journey from Music to Muse in the Selected Poems of Bob Dylan”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 433-439, 2017.

2017

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B., “From Village to City: An analysis of Kamala Markandaya’s Nectar in a Sieve and Anita Desai’s The Village by the Sea”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 5, no. 12, p. 9, 2017.[Abstract]


The paper titled “From Village to City: An analysis of Kamala Markandaya’s Nectar in a  Sieve and Anita Desai’s The Village by the Sea” is an attempt to examine the attitudes of two characters to change, one representing  the older generation and the other the younger generation. In The Village by the Sea, Hari welcomes change while in Nectar in Sieve, Rukmani is unwilling to get acclimatized to the change that spills over to the village, but gradually becomes resilient to it.

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2017

Journal Article

H. S and Aswathy Das K V., “An Ecological Sanctuary and Sacrilege: Exploring the Regimes of Wilderness in Into the Wild”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 5, p. 13, 2017.[Abstract]


Fed up with the modern materialistic society, Chris McCandless, an American youth goes for a great adventure into the Alaskan wild which ends with his tragic death. This paper attempts to bring out the existential crisis experienced by Chris pursuant to his rejection of the modern American Dream and, his attempt to find his true identity in the wilderness. To Chris, nature was the right place to experience life in all its true essence. Unable to understand the pulse and nature of the wild, Chris gets trapped in the labyrinth of the wild. The life of Chris hands a lesson for all mankind that man is merely a tiny speck in the universe. Using theories of eco-criticism and transcendentalism, this paper also explores the sovereign status of nature with respect to human deficiencies and limitations.

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2017

Journal Article

A. Babu and Aswathy Das K V., “Blending the Personal and the Political: A Re-visioning of the Ethnic and Secular in Husband of a Fanatic”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 5, p. 10, 2017.[Abstract]


Amitava Kumar, through his travelogue writing, Husband of a Fanatic, tried to find out the real barrier that inhibits the communities of people from having a harmonious and peaceful coexistence. Amitava Kumar had to face many predicaments on marrying a Pakistani Muslim woman. After these experiences, he travelled through different parts of India and Pakistan, to get a close look at the conditions of the minority and the majority segments in society. Besides gaining an understanding of the condition, the aim of the travel project was to establish a space for himself and his family. The book, Husband of a Fanatic can be considered not merely as a journey but as his way of self-discovery.

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2017

Journal Article

M. M.A. and Anusudha R. S., “Mad Man in the Attic: Reconstruction of Marginalised Masculine Identity in M.T’s Selected Works”, IJELLH (International Journal of English Language, Literature in Humanities), vol. 5, no. 6, 2017.[Abstract]


M.T. Vasudevan Nair provides a rather resilient expression to the suppressed male voices in his works. The theme of human alienation and marginalization runs though most of his works: Appunni in Naalukettu, Sethumadhavan in Kaalam, Karunan Master of  Vanaprastham, Velayudhan in Iruttinte Athmaav, Bhima in Randamoozham, Chandu in Oru Vadakkan Veeragadha are all representatives of the stifled individuals. Gita Krishnankutty translated the novel Randamoozham into English, which is entitled, Bhima: Lone Warrior. Both Chandu and Bhima, who were popularly misunderstood, are strongly uplifted and brought to the front by the author. Story of Chandu, who is considered as ‘betrayer’ in the ​​​​​​​Vadakkanpaattukal (Ballads of the North) is reconstructed by M.T. in his story Oru Vadakkan Veeragadha. This study intends to analyze the inhibited and marginalized identities of the male characters in M.T’s selected works focusing mainly on Randamoozham and Oru Vadakkan Veeragadha which are the representative works of his milieu.

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2017

Journal Article

N. Saranya and Anusudha R. S., “Mapping the Borders of the Subconscious: A Study on the Dynamics of the Nocturnal Psyche in Murakami’s After Dark”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature (RJELAL) A Peer Reviewed (Refereed) International Journal, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 592-598, 2017.[Abstract]


This research paper offers a study of the popular Japanese writer Haruki Murakami’s novel After Dark (2004) and retraces the inherent human instincts through the exploration of the psyche. A psychological explanation is given to the violence of human beings by associating it with the psychological devices, mirror, and mask. These devices reflect the inner psyche, the primitive animal self of an individual. Jung’s tripartite division of human psyche- anima/animus, shadow, and persona is also discussed in the paper by drawing parallels with the novel. The stressed and pressured psyche is the reason for the outburst of human violence, and this is proved through the paper. The darkness assists the man and therefore the inner consciousness takes the form of a nocturnal psyche that lives and breathes in darkest corners of one’s heart.

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2017

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran and Nair, A. S., “Humanising the Divine: A Select Study of Amish Tripathi’s Immortals of Meluha”, English Language and Literature, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 456-465, 2017.[Abstract]


This research paper makes an attempt to discover how Shiva as a man distinguishes from Lord Shiva and the extent to which the author succeeds in presenting Shiva Trilogy as a spiritual guide to modern generation. Amish chooses the most multi-faceted god from Hindu Mythology to weave his tale about. He presents Shiva as a moral being asking, “What if Lord Shiva was not a figment of rich imagination but a person of flesh and blood?”. Amish amends Shiva Purana by redefining Lord Shiva as a man of flesh and blood who later transforms to godly stature because of his karma. Human centred approach revolves throughout the novel which empower the author to present Shiva Trilogy as a spiritual guide to upcoming generation as it equip them to discover Mahadev with in them to absorb evil and perspire goodness.

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2016

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran, “Torn Between the Dual Identities: A study of Anita Nair’s Mistress”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature (RJELAL), vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 452-456, 2016.[Abstract]


Post colonialism refers to an academic discipline which analyses, describes and responds to the cultural legacies of colonialism and imperialism. Postcolonial reading of a text delves into the identity of a person as a colonizer as well as the colonized. This emphasis on identity as doubled or unstable one is a major characteristic of the postcolonial approach. Another major aspect of postcolonial studies is its representation of the ‘subalterns’. Though the term broadly implies peasants, working classes, tribal, and women, Gayatri Spivak suggests that subaltern is not just a classy word for "oppressed", for the Other, but for everything that has limited or no access to the cultural imperialism. This paper seeks to analyse these two aspects of postcolonial reading in the character of Shyam from Anita Nair’s Mistress. Shyam is a victim of the doubled identity as he is a success in his social life who hails from a poor family and raises himself to be a great businessman envied by many and at the same time a failure in his marital life where his wife despises him and falls in love with Chris, a foreigner. His poor background gives him an inferiority which makes him unable to control his wife or scuffle with Chris. Though Shyam tries to subjugate Radha with love, he fails in it due to his subaltern identity. He is again traumatized by the so-called ‘subaltern’ identity when he had to witness Radha falling in love with Christopher Stewart, a traveler writer who comes to meet Koman, Radha’s uncle. His masculinity is questioned when his wife conceives from Christopher after eight long years of their marriage in vain. Though Shyam attempts to exercise his supremacy over his wife, he is ruled out by Christopher. It can be seen that Radha, whom Shyam regards as his own Syamantakam is preempted by Chris and Shyam is dismissed from his own life. Shyam’s identity is reduced to that of a subaltern status when his wife is surmounted by Christopher. More »»

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B., “Philosophical Visions of Sree Narayana Guru and Sri Aurobindo”, International Journal New Literary Horizons , vol. 5, 2016.

2016

Journal Article

K. Mol K, “An Audacious Enquiry into the Enigmatic Expedition of Feminine Psyche in Vinod Mankara’s Ottamandaram”, Literature and Technology of Interface: A Collection of Edited Articles, 2016.

2016

Journal Article

K. Mol K, “The White Tiger: An Exploration of the Inexplicable Angst of Incredible India”, International journal of English Language, Literature & Humanities, vol. IV, no. VIII, 2016.

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B., “Sri Aurobindo’s Vision of Poetry”, The Quest , 2016.

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B., “Pearls of Vedantic Wisdom in Sree Narayana Guru’s Poems”, Research Journal of English Language and Literature (International) , vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 284-288., 2016.

2016

Journal Article

Beena S. Nair, “Purple,Blue-Black and Blues:Womanist Discourses as Resistance Narrative in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple”, International Journal of English Language, Literature and Humanities, vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 64-70., 2016.[Abstract]


The Black women have always been the victims of racial and gender discrimination. The marginal space they occupy in the society, have made them aware of a need for sisterhood or bonding between women. The narrative in the black-womanist fiction acts as a resistance to the oppression suffered by them. These womanist discourses empower them and heal them. This paper attempts to mark these nature and music discourses that grant them self-esteem and individuality. These women “sing to the earth and to the sky and to their cassava and groundnuts. Songs of love and farewell.” Alice Walker defines the term ‘womanist’ as
“womanist is to feminist as purple to lavender”. (Walker: xi-xii). These womanists “love music, love the moon, love the spirit… Love struggle. Love the Folk. Love herself.” The color purple spreads through out the novel and the blues music provides individuality to the black women. The fight for self-respect is frightening for Celie, the protagonist. She transforms herself in to a tree in moments of pain. “I say to myself, Celie you a tree.” Shug Avery, the Blue singer names Celie in her song, “Miss Celie’s Song” and thereby empowers her. These black women create an alternate garden, where they can celebrate blackness. The role of music and color purple as therapeutic, resistance, womanist discourse would be examined in this paper. The adaptation of this novel as a movie also uses color purple as a major visual tool to bring in to the viewer’s mind, the spirit of the black women. These visuals of color purple in the movie would also be examined as a narrative artifice in the marginalized discourse.

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2016

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran, “Myth as a Symbolic Narrative: A Study of the Selected Myths of Malabar Theyyam Cult”, English Language and Literature, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 486-490, 2016.[Abstract]


Symbolism refers to the use of symbols to suggest concepts and possibilities by attributing to them symbolic connotations that are dissimilar from their literal meanings. Symbolism takes diverse forms. Symbolism supplements double levels of implications to a work: a literal one that is irrefutable and the symbolic one whose meaning is far more intense than the literal one. Symbolism makes the plot, characters and the motifs of literature universal. The paper is an attempt to analyse the myths underlying Theyyam as symbols of the travails of the lower caste people. Theyyam is a pattern of hero worship performed in the Kolathunadu region of the North Malabar area of Kerala, India, as a living culture with several thousand years of tradition, rituals and customs. The art is performed by the people of the lower class community. Theyyam rituals mostly take place either within the precincts of a small shrine which is usually called Kavu or in the courtyard of an ancestral house, or in a wide space with a temporary shrine called pathi. There are various myths underlying each Theyyam performance. These myths tell us the story of a lower class man/woman who was subjected to the cruelties of the upper caste society and it’s after effects and how these men/women are deified. Therefore these myths are stories justifying the deification of the downtrodden people which is an uncommon occurrence. At the same time, they act as symbols representing the sufferings of these people and how they function as resistance narratives. These myths can also be read as weaved stories that can act as a shield to protect the oppressed community from the tortures of the aristocratic groups.

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2015

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran, “Defining Indian American Identity through Home and Family in Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth”, Tetso Interdisciplinary Journal , vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 45-51, 2015.[Abstract]


Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earthm mainly focuses on the lives of the first and second generation Indian immigrants who have settled in America. The characters of these stories face the challenges of belonging to two different cultures and strive to maintain ties to both cultures. The second generation Indian immigrants find themselves caught between the culture and traditional values of their immigrant parents and the mainstream culture of the American society they live in. In most of these stories home and family has a crucial role in the formation and the development of Indian American identity. Migrant families maintain their ethnicity through preservation of the native language, religions and cultural traditions.Family, being a visible social institution, its choice and representation allows the immigrants to embrace or reject one of their confusing identities, either Indian or American. This paper analyses the role of home and family as crucial elements in shaping the identities of the first and second generation Indian Americans in the selected text More »»

2014

Journal Article

I. B, “AdvaitaDarsanam in Sree Narayana Guru’s AtmopadesaSatakam”, international Journal The Quest, 2014.

2014

Journal Article

S. M. Chandran, “Feminist Retelling of Ramayana: A study of Sara Josephs selected works”, Research Essence, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 65-71, 2014.[Abstract]


This paper focuses on the attempt of reconstructing Rama as a common man and crumbling his iconic figure in Sara Joseph's writings. Rama through out India is regarded as God himself, an avatar of Lord Vishnu. Many versions of Ramayana portrays him as God, while some other versions sees him as the most noble man in the world. But Sara Joseph's writings give voice to the other marginalised characters in Ramayana. The words of these marginalised characters brings to light how the alteration of Dharma and Adharma takes place when the women characters who were deprived of justice start composing their own epics. Through her retellings Sara Joseph has succeeded in bringing out most of the injustices that predominated in the patriarchal society. In short Valmiki' s icon of Dharma is thus constructed as the performer of Adharma. More »»

2014

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B., “Advaitadarshanam in Sree Narayana Guru’s Atmopadesasathakam”, The Quest (National Journal) , 2014.

2014

Journal Article

K. Mol K, “Modern Education System: An Analysis”, Text & Context: Bi-annual for Research in Education, vol. 2, 2014.

2013

Journal Article

I. B., “One Caste, One God, One Religion: Sree Narayana Guru: A Jnanin of Action”, international journal MS Academic, 2013.

2013

Journal Article

M. S. Veena and Ramanathan, P. V., “New Orientalism in Literature: A Critical Overview”, The Criterion, vol. 4, 2013.

2013

Journal Article

Dr. Indu B. and Ramanathan, D. P. V., “One Caste, One Religion, One God: Sree Narayana Guru a Jnanin of Action”, MS Academic - International Multi-disciplinary Refereed Journal, 2013.

Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Book Chapter

Beena S. Nair, Jayaraman, H., and Akhil V. P., “Configuring the Common Man: Trends and Perspectives in Contemporary Literature.”, in Hinterland as 'Exotic other': Reconstituting Native Culture in O.V Vijayan's The Legends of Khasak, New Delhi: Authors Press, 2017.

2017

Book Chapter

Beena S. Nair, K, S. Muraleedha, and K, D. E. V. I., “Neo - Narrative of 'Doves and Hawks': The Rise of the Counterculture of the 'Indian Spring' Intellectuals”, in Explorations in Critical Humanities, A Collection of Essays., New Delhi: Viva Books Private Limited , 2017, pp. 126-132 .

2016

Book Chapter

Aswathy Das K V., “The Death of Innocence in the Age of Industry – A Study of Jayaraj’s Ottaal”, in Literature & Technology of interface: A Collection of Edited Articles. Kochi: Amrita School of Arts and Sciences, 2016, pp. 44 - 47.

2016

Book Chapter

Beena S. Nair, “Budha’s Gaze: Re-Creating Cultural Identities in Kim-Ki-Duk’s Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring”, in Literature and Technology: An Interface, Collection of Edited Articles, Kochi: Sterling print House, 2016, pp. 48-51.

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2017

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, “Sustaining Landscapes as Sacred Groves:Preserving the Sub Culture of Woman as Priestess and Oracle of Ecosystems’”, in International Conference on “Why Eco-Criticism”?, Government College, Sikkim; in association with ASLE,India., 2017.

2016

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, “Buddha’s Gaze: Re-creating Cultural Identities in Kim-Ki-Duk’s Spring,Summer,Fall and Winter and Spring”, in National Seminar on Cinema and the Formation of Cultural Identities, Amrita School of Arts &Sciences,Kochi., 2016.

2016

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, ““Neo - Narrative of 'Doves and Hawks': The Rise of the Counterculture of the 'Indian Spring' Intellectuals"”, in International Conference on "In Between: Critical Humanities in Context" (22 October 2016),, Amrita School of Arts &Sciences, Kochi., 2016.

2016

Conference Paper

S. M. Chandran, “Myth as a Symbol: A Study of the Theyyam Myths of North Malabar”, in Symbolism in Art, Archaeology and Literature, Pune, 2016.

2015

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, “Discourse of Nation in Exile, and Resistance to Erasure of Civilization: Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Diaspora””, in UGC National Seminar on ”Travails of Uprootment: A Tribute to Refugees, Exiles and Diasporic Communities”, MSM College,Kayamkulam., 2015.

2014

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, “Landscape as Cultural Texts in Regional fiction with special reference to O. V. Vijayan’s The Legend of Khasak, Patrick White’s Voss and Eudora Welty’s The Robber Bridegroom”, in International Conference on, “Multiculturalism and Social Fabric in Australia,America and India”, Queen’s Mary College, Chennai. , 2014.

2014

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, “Purple,Blue-Black and Blues: Womanist Discourses as Resistance Narrative in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple”, in UGC National Seminar on “Moving the Centre: Black and Dalit Literatures”, TKM College of Arts & Sciences, Kollam., 2014.

2014

Conference Paper

Beena S. Nair, “Ozhimuri: A Reading on the Matrix of the Interior Landscape of Kanyakumari””, in National Seminar on “Down to Earth:Ecological Orientations in Literature and Arts”, Amrita School of Arts &Sciences,Kochi., 2014.

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2016

Conference Proceedings

S. M. Chandran, “Torn Between the two: Celebrating the trauma of misplaced identities in Anita Nairs Mistress”, UGC sponsored National seminar on Divergent Voices: Trends in Postcoloniality. Post graduate Department of English, Nirmala College, Muvattupuzha and IJPCL, 2016.

2015

Conference Proceedings

K. Mol K, “Estrangement of Identity and Exploration of a neo-self in Monica Ali’s Brick Lane”, Travails of Uprootment: A Tribute to Refugees, Exiles and Diasporic Communities. 2015.

2015

Conference Proceedings

Beena S. Nair, “Discourse of Nation in Exile, and Resistance to Erasure of Civilization: Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Diaspora”, UGC National Seminar on ”Travails of Uprootment: A Tribute to Refugees, Exiles and Diasporic Communities” . MSM College, Kayamkulam., pp. 261-265, 2015.

2014

Conference Proceedings

S. M. Chandran, “The role of Home and Family in shaping the Indian American identity in Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth”, International Seminar on Contemporary American Literature: Trends and Prospects. Postgraduate Department of English and Research Centre for Comparative Studies, Mercy College, Palakkad , 2014.

2014

Conference Proceedings

Beena S. Nair, “Ozhimuri: A Reading on the Matrix of the Interior Landscape of Kanyakumari”, National Seminar on”Down to Earth: Ecological Orientations in Literature and Arts”. ASAS, Kochi, pp. 71-75 , 2014.