In an era where knowledge creation and applied research is being acknowledged as the primary basis for the development and growth of society, ASB is also moving in the same direction.

Amrita is one of the few B-Schools in the country where a doctoral Program in Management is offered. The doctoral Program was started by ASB with a view to encouraging the aspiring scholars to take up research in the country. The first batch of the doctoral Program was commenced in 2009. Learn More »

The ASB faculty has over the years published in some of the top peer reviewed international journals of their respective fields. This list includes Annals of Operation Research, European Journal of Operations Research, International Journal of Applied Economics and Econometrics, International Journal of Operations Research, International Journal of Production Economics, International Journal of Systems Science, OPSEARCH, Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of International Business Studies, Academy of Management, Academy of Management Review, Long Range Planning, and Leadership and Organizational Development Journal.

Publications

Publication Type: Conference Paper

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2020

Conference Paper

Anju Kamal and Dr. Rajiv Prasad, ““The Chinese whisper –"Do employees really hear what management says?” - An exploration into the organizational communication of platform sourcing organizations””, in in INDAM2020 Indian Academy of Management Sixth Biennial Conference, Indian Institute of Management Tiruchirappalli, Tiruchirappalli, 2020.

2019

Conference Paper

Dr. Rajiv Nair, Arifur Khan Moham Muttakin, Nava Subramaniam, and Dr. V. S. Somanath, “Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure, Business Group and Agency Costs: Evidence from India”, in Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ 2019) , Brisbane, Australia, 2019.

2019

Conference Paper

Karthika S. and Dr. Rajiv Nair, “Does Mandatory CSR Legislation Facilitate Earnings Management: Evidence from India”, in International Conference on Fostering Economic Transformation through Inclusive Business: Innovate and Inspire (Received best paper award) , Manipal Institute of Technology, School of Management, Centre for Advanced Research in Financial Inclusion, 2019.

2019

Conference Paper

Amuktha M. and Dr. Rajiv Nair, “Corporate Social Responsibility and Share Holder Value of Manufacturing Companies”, in International Conference on Fostering Economic Transformation through Inclusive Business: Innovate and Inspire , Manipal Institute of Technology, School of Management, Centre for Advanced Research in Financial Inclusion, 2019.

2018

Conference Paper

Anju Kamal and Dr. Saswat Barpannda, “Factors influencing the energy consumption behavior pattern among the Indian higher education institution students”, in Proceedings of 2017 IEEE International Conference on Technological Advancements in Power and Energy: Exploring Energy Solutions for an Intelligent Power Grid, TAP Energy 2017, 2018, pp. 1-6.[Abstract]


Towards the development of a sustainable campus of higher education institutions, energy consumption behavior of students is one of the several matters that require attention. Insights in to the energy consumption behavior of students will help to chalk out a good strategy for energy management. The purpose of this study is to assess energy consumption behavior among Indian higher education institutions students. This study has an objective to determine the factors which influence the energy consumption behaviors of students. The 'energy culture' framework from the literature is used in the study for arriving at the energy consumption behavior pattern of the students. Further the study also explores the role that personality of the student plays in exhibiting a sustainable energy consumption behavior. A self-administrated survey was carried out involving 75 respondents at Amrita University. The students were assessed on Building Regulation, Environmental Concern, Social Aspiration and Comfort along with Education, Activities, Social Marketing and Personality variables of Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Agreeableness and Emotional stability. The data was analyzed using multiple regression and the results revealed that the independent variables Education, Activities, Social Marketing and Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness and Emotional stability were influencing the dependent variables of Building Regulation, Environmental Concern, Social Aspiration and Comfort. Social marketing and Education were strongly and significantly related to the all the dependent variables. The personality variables of Conscientiousness, Extraversion also was found to be strongly and significantly related to Environmental Concern, Social Aspiration and Comfort. This study highlights the need for understanding social marketing, education and personality as an important potential variable for promoting energy efficient consumption behavior among students. The present study contributes to an understanding of the factors influencing the Energy Consumption Behavior Pattern and thus work attempts to make a small contribution to theory and research in Energy Consumption. © 2017 IEEE.

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2018

Conference Paper

Dr. Rajiv Nair, Mohammad Muttakin, Arifur Khan, Nava Subramaniam, and Dr. V. S. Somanath, “CSR Disclosure and Financial Transparency: Evidence From India”, in 9th Financial Management and Corporate Governance Conference, LaTrobe University, Melbourne, Australia, 2018.

2018

Conference Paper

Anju Kamal and Deepa, “Personality and Learning styles”, in International Conference on Electrical, Electronics, Computers, Communication, Mechanical and Computing EECCMC, 2018.

2018

Conference Paper

Anju Kamal and Anu Kurien, “Motives of Smartphone usage as predictors of the personality of University students”, in ATHENAEUM , IIT Chennai Campus, 2018.

2018

Conference Paper

Anju Kamal and Souhedra R., “Personality style as a predictor of learning styles”, in ATHENAEUM, IIT Chennai Campus, 2018.

2017

Conference Paper

M. Frey, Manoj P., Mohan, R., Sai Shibu N. B., Gracia, V. C., Mohan, V., and , “Elevating Education of India's Rural Village Girls Through Distance Learning Technology Supported by Sustainable Electricity”, in GHTC 2017 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, Proceedings, 2017.[Abstract]


Augmenting educational opportunities for rural village girls in India has been highlighted as a significant Millennium Development Goal (MDG) necessary to help eradicate poverty in developing countries. The role of proper electrification in rural villages, another MDG, plays a significant role in providing necessary energy for educational needs. In a small village in the state of Jharkhand, India there are serious problems with current limited educational opportunities, particularly for girls, as well as electrification problems. These obstacles were assessed, and it was determined that with a proper and reliable electrification system in place, a Distance Learning (DL) educational program to support village education could support continued and constant education for girls through primary and secondary school. Interviews with villagers resulted in very positive support for such a system within the village. In this paper we address the current obstacles to education in the village. Also presented are the practical challenges in attaining the technical framework for the proposed DL innovation including software, suitable learning facilities, network connectivity, personnel support, and so on, all dependent upon a larger framework of reliable sustainable power system. In terms of electric availability, it is widely assumed that Indian villages now have electricity through efforts of government initiatives. However, the reality is that in many villages the actual electrical access has not been adequate to meet even simple village needs. A sustainable electrification model to support current grid is also currently underway for the village. The overall goal of the program is to enhance academic educational achievements of village girls, adolescents, and adults, thus helping to uplift the standard of living in the village, and diminishing current problems related to current low educational status of most there.

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2017

Conference Paper

Anju Kamal and Dr. Saswat Barpannda, “Moderating role of Technological Changes in the relationship between Human Capital and Labour productivity in the Indian Automobile Industry”, in 59th Annual, Indian Society for Labour Economics –ISLE Conference , Trivandrum, 2017.

2017

Conference Paper

Dr. Avinash Shivdas and Sougata Ray, “Resource Utilization by Pharmaceutical Companies in India: Emphasis on R D, Labor and Capital”, in 2017 International Conference on Data Management, Analytics and Innovation (ICDMAI) (pp. 19-23). IEEE, 2017.[Abstract]


The growing competition in the Indian Pharmaceutical Industry has emphasized that they utilize resources in an effective manner to ensure sustainable growth. Using data of 116 India pharmaceutical companies for the year financial year 2013-14, we find that R&D expenditures are statistically significant along with expenditure on physical and human capital in explaining the sales performance. We also present an alternative framework based on resource utilization for mapping and measuring the performance of a firm and its competitors. Our study shows that the average technical efficiency for the Indian Pharma firms is low and there is also wide variation among the firm. We conclude that resource optimization is a key for the long term sustainable growth of any firm.

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2015

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Economic Models, Growth and Sustainable Development”, in Youth Conference on Small Island Developing States and Climate Change, Indian Ocean Commission/European Union in Mauritius, 2015.[Abstract]


Economic models are prepared utilizing stylized facts and available information about the economy and economic agents. The overwhelming dependence on market efficiency and limitations of cost benefit analysis tend to underplay the role of environmental resources in growth process. What is vital to note is that invisible positive externalities of environmental resources are under-estimated but negative externalities generated during production and consumption activities are also under-estimated. The end result is that economic activities creating negative externalities are boosted due to inefficiency of markets and public policy failure. There is however a paradigm shift in economic thinking and environmental contributions to economic growth are well recognized. Technically speaking, environmental contributions to growth are part of total factor productivity, which derives its strength from environmental and other missing factors in the model. Further analytical advances are necessary to isolate the environmental impacts.Besides the concept of externalities in the context of environmental degradation, an analysis is presented to explain the existence of externalities in relation to sustainable development by bringing in historical (inter-temporal) externalities, overlapping generational externalities and intergenerational externalities.
We argue that pollution anywhere is a danger for pollution everywhere. In other words, a simple application of polluter pays principle would not help in recovering the cost of damage as polluters are spread at large. Conventional environmental instruments are handy but not adequate to handle border less pollution. While integration of sustainability in development strategy is crucial, it is necessary to enact mandatory laws. Both preventive and restoration expenditures should be made mandatory on the lines of mandatory corporate social responsibility in some countries. A separate budgetary head would need to be created. This budget should be run on the model of performance budgeting purely in terms of environmental projects. What is more instructive is that since externalities have no national boundaries, tackling global externalities would necessitate intergovernmental and international co-operation. This would ensure the application of international best practice technologies and knowhow in environmental governance. While the success of international agreements is slow, climate clubs may hold promise. Small islands however should be adopted as experimental laboratories, which would benefit both the threatened islands in particular and global environment in general.

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2015

Conference Paper

Manoj P., Raghu Raman, Dr. Krishnashree Achuthan, and Jayaraman, Bd, “Preparing global engineers: USA-India academia & industry led approach”, in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, 2015, vol. 2015-February.[Abstract]


A major challenge in engineering education today in India is preparing students with the skill set needed for a global industry. This paper describes an innovative partnership between two institutions of higher education in India and USA and a multinational corporation to address this challenge. The collaborative manner in which the industry and institutions internationalized the curriculum is a key feature of this program. This unique approach has resulted in the employees of a multinational company in India being able to get two high quality Masters-level degrees in engineering, customized to their current and future requirements at a very affordable price point. This paper looks at cost savings, collaborative course development between industry and international academia, using technology to deliver courses and on-the-job professional development program for employees while keeping the employees motivated. But there are also interesting lessons learnt regarding teaching in English, adjusting to the local cultural context and the overall integration into the Indian academic setting. The process innovation described here would be of great interest to academia, industry and education policy makers and has the potential to be replicated in the entire field of non-engineering and interdisciplinary academic programs. © 2014 IEEE.

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PDF iconpreparing-global-engineers-usa-india-academia-industry-led-approach-1.pdf

2015

Conference Paper

Dr. Rajiv Nair and Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, “What’s in a name? Reviewing the Genesis of CSR’”, in Inclusive Growth & Profits with Purpose, IMRA-IIMB, 2015.

2014

Conference Paper

Manoj P., Dr. Krishnashree Achuthan, and Raghu Raman, “Preparing Global Engineers, Academia-Industry led approach: Indian experience”, in 44th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, 2014.[Abstract]


A major challenge in engineering education today in India is preparing students with the skill set needed for a global industry. This paper describes an innovative partnership between two institutions of higher education in India and USA and a multinational corporation to address this challenge. The collaborative manner in which the industry and institutions internationalized the curriculum is a key feature of this program. This unique approach has resulted in the employees of a multinational company in India being able to get two high quality Masters-level degrees in engineering, customized to their current and future requirements at a very affordable price point. This paper looks at cost savings, collaborative course development between industry and international academia, using technology to deliver courses and on-the-job professional development program for employees while keeping the employees motivated. But there are also interesting lessons learnt regarding teaching in English, adjusting to the local cultural context and the overall integration into the Indian academic setting. The process innovation described here would be of great interest to academia, industry and education policy makers and has the potential to be replicated in the entire field of non-engineering and interdisciplinary academic programs.

More »»
PDF iconpreparing-global-engineers-usa-india-academia-industry-led-approach-1.pdf

2014

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Fragile Economies: Contemporary Institutions vs. Colonial Incidence”, in 61st Annual North American Regional Science Conference (NARSC), Washington DC, USA, 2014.[Abstract]


The original contribution of this paper is that it empirically examines the role of pre-colonial and post-colonial institutions in reducing fragility by overcoming the negative effects of colonial governance. In a first stage, dynamic analysis of state fragility establishes the existence of a low equilibrium fragility trap, which can largely be attributed to persisting effects of colonial rule, measured by a computed index of colonial incidence. This situation is compounded as increases in current output and quality of secondary schooling seem insufficient to push countries out of extreme fragility -- a case of unmatched expectations during post-colonial period. It is worth noting that pre-colonial state governance and population abundance at time of independence (used as proxy for absence of massive slave trade) engender fragility-reducing impacts. These historical endowments however are not strong enough to overcome colonial drag. In a second stage, the paper extends the existing development literature on colonial and contemporary institutions by examining the efficacy of alternative institutions that matter more for weakening the force of colonial incidence (not attempted in the literature), apart from having significant fragility-reducing effects. In the economic development literature, colonial governance and weak post-colonial institutions are shown to be two major sources of under-development and state fragility. These studies however do not envisage the mechanism by which strong contemporary institutions succeed in overcoming the negative effects of colonial institutions that would have carried over and produced a drag on growth and state capacity during post-colonial period. The paper extends this strand of the literature by investigating the effectiveness of alternative contemporary institutions in weakening the force of colonial incidence (effect 2) apart from having significant fragility-reducing effects (effect 1). 3SLS results reveal that economic institutions captured by rule of law, government effectiveness, protection of property rights and transparency reduce state fragility and colonial incidence. Conversely, political institutions measured by democracy, civil liberties and political stability exhibit fragility-dampening effect but the force of colonial incidence is found to carry over in the presence of these institutions. Control on executives does not appear to generate either impact. Thus, economic institutions are found to be more effective in achieving the goal of fragility-reduction via colonial incidence mitigation, which may be a pre-condition for escaping the fragility trap. Interestingly, macro-policy exhibits limited success in mitigating state fragility while micro-policy and luck factors seem insignificant. Weak fragility-reducing effects of tropics, ethnic diversity and landlocked location require further research.

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2014

Conference Paper

G. Sridevi, Dr. Amalendu Jyotishi, Dr. Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra, Bedamatta, S., and Jagadeesh, G., “Climate Change Vulnerability and Agrarian Communities-Insights from the Composite Vulnerability Index of Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka”, in International conference on climate change, Kerala University, Trivandrum, India, 2014.[Abstract]


Climate change is a main challenge for agriculture, food security and rural livelihoods for billions of people in India. Agriculture is the sector most vulnerable to climate change due to its high dependence on climate and weather conditions. Among India’s population of more than one billion people, about 68% are directly or indirectly involved in the agricultural sector. This sector is particularly vulnerable to present-day climate variability. In this contest this paper examines the Socio-economic and climate analytical study of the vulnerability index in Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka states using secondary data; it examines the vulnerability through five different Sub-indicator of socio-demographic, agriculture, occupational, common property resource (CPR), and climate in respective states among different districts. Data was used in this paper has taken from different sources, like census in India 2011, Directorate of Economics and Statistics of respective states governments. Rainfall data was collected from the India Meteorological Department (IMD). In order to capture the vulnerability from two different states the composite vulnerability index (CVI) was developed and used. This indicates the vulnerability situation of different districts under two states. The study finds that Adilabed district in Andhra Pradesh and Chamarajanagar in Karnataka had highest level of vulnerability while Hyderabad and Bangalore in respective states have least level of vulnerability. Further, it also notices that the index was mapped using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) maps and it has been observed that almost same districts from two states are found to be facing highest vulnerability.

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2014

Conference Paper

Raghu Raman, Vachhrajani, H., Dr. Avinash Shivdas, and Prof. Prema Nedungadi, “Low cost tablets as disruptive educational innovation: modeling its diffusion within Indian K12 system”, in Innovations in Technology Conference (InnoTek), 2014 IEEE, 2014.[Abstract]


The world of today is not looking for innovations that are mere incremental but those that are disruptive. Aakash, the Low Cost Tablet (LCT) initiative by Indian govt. was launched in 2011 amidst dominance by the likes of Apple, Amazon, and Samsung etc. Single most objective of this initiative was affordable ICT learning tool for the 220+ million students. LCT like Aakash can be seen as a disruptive innovation from the as they are simple to use, cheap, low performing, targeted at low portion of mainstream market and focused on social sectors like education, health to increase access and equity. Within Rogers theory of Diffusion of Innovation, we propose a framework for innovation attributes that can significantly predict student and teacher behavior intentions and motivations towards LCT for use in classrooms. Authors investigate the innovation attributes for adoption of LCT in a social group comprising of (N=121) potential-adopter students and teachers from India. The results revealed that motivations for adopting LCT are strongly associated with innovation attributes like relative advantage, compatibility, ease of use, peer influence, perceived enjoyment and perceived usefulness. Overall, both teachers and students expressed positive attitude towards using LCT as it enhanced their digital literacy skills. Bigger question is to identify what kind of new teacher training program, models and approaches and learning environment are required for successful adoption of educational innovation like LCT. Findings contribute to the design of new pedagogical models that maximizes learning potential of LCTs for K12 education.

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PDF iconLow Cost Tablets as disruptive educational innovation- Modeling its diffusion within Indian K12 system.pdf

2012

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Biodiversity at Risk: Import as an Environmental Policy”, in 18th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC), UK, 2012.

2012

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Beneficiary charges: The Cinderella of sub-national finance, Taxation and Development: The Weakest Link”, presented at the 09/2012, Stone Mountain, Marriott Conference Resort, Atlanta (Georgia, USA), 2012.[Abstract]


Taxation and Development highlights the importance of better understanding the ways in which taxes and expenditure are linked. Focusing on developing countries, the book argues for a broader approach to the topic, with a secondary focus on developing and applying new modeling techniques to country-specific data.

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2011

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Strategic Environmental Compliance in SIDS: How Important are Political Economy Factors?”, in 17th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC), USA, 2011.

2009

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Assessing the Effectiveness of Environmental Regulations in SIDS: How Important are Political Economy Factors?”, in 56th Annual Conference of North American Regional Science Association, USA, 2009.[Abstract]


The success of environmental regulation across the world and in particular LDCs is questionable. Political economy factors are often cited as being significant contributors to environmental policy failures. This contention however has not been systematically tested in the empirical literature with respect to small island developing states (SIDS), which need more attention in terms of environmental policy and governance. This paper seeks to address this gap in the literature. In the proposed models, effectiveness of environmental regulation is captured by (i) level of stringency of environmental regulations, (ii) the degree of enforcement, and (iii) the achievement of various pollution reduction and natural resource conservation goals (measures of environmental performance and sustainability). Cross-country regressions reveal that the perceived degree of enforcement and stringency of environmental regulations as well as overall environmental performance are adversely impacted by corruption and political instability in SIDS. Similar results are obtained for other LDCs. However, when we control for specificities of SIDS such as economic resilience, size, vulnerability and degree of competitiveness, the significance of political economy factors appears to lessen. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of the tourism sector and agricultural sectors in SIDS as important lobby powers in dampening the effectiveness of regulations. The paper finally discusses the environmental policy challenges in island economies in the light of empirical results.

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2008

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Biodiversity at Risk: Analysing the Effectiveness of Fishing Policy Options in Mauritius”, in Workshop on Integrating Social and Ecological Data on a Regional Scale in the Western Indian Ocean, Mauritius, 2008.

2008

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Sustainable energy from renewable biological resources: The case of sugarcane bagasse”, in Workshop on energy efficiency, sustainability and societal change, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, 2008.[Abstract]


A sustainable environment is a precondition for sustainable economic development. When an economy produces GDP by using energy and other inputs, the planet produces an invisible product, known as photosynthetic product of the planet (PPP) as a natural process. This PPP however contributes to the production of GDP as an invisible input. As GDP increases, there are adverse effects on the growth of PPP due to utilisation of environmental and natural resources. If degradation of the environment is not arrested and exhaustible natural resources are not conserved, the natural growth of PPP and consequently, future GDP growth will decline. In other words, the environmental cost of producing GDP will tend to increase, alongside the threats posed by global warming.

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2007

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “International Migration, Remittances and Economic Resilience of SIDs: A Cross-Country Analysis”, in 54th Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, USA, 2007.[Abstract]


While the relationships between international migration, remittances and economic development have been a standard subject of economic enquiry, no systematic attempt has been made to investigate their linkages with respect to economic resilience of small, island developing states (SIDs). This study is an attempt to address this gap. The first part of the paper develops a theoretical framework linking international migration and migrant remittances with economic resilience. An empirical model is formulated in part two. The following issues have been analysed using panel data for a sample of small, island states. 1. International migration having impact on economic resilience through labour market developments including migrants’ remittance behaviour. Whereas adverse implications are found for the labour market in the sense of lack of domestic labour supply, on the balance, international migration has strengthened economic resilience through positive impacts of remittances in some samples. The impact of expatriate labour is also assessed on local labour productivity and wages. The empirical results show that foreign and domestic labour wage and productivity linkages are not well aligned. This would give support to the presence of political economy factors. 2. The contribution of remittances to economic resilience in the presence of asymmetric information. Remittances have been found to finance consumption with no significant impact on investment decisions. Thus the capital market effects appear to diminish economic resilience. 3. Do remittances reduce aid flows and thereby increase resilience of a country? The objective here is to test for substitute and complementary relationship between remittances and foreign aid. It is shown that remittances and foreign aid are complementary. This would imply that small states are more open and have a tendency to increase recourse to foreign capital flows. Since more foreign aid is available to SIDs, the sensitivity analysis of these results has been performed, using high, medium and low aid regimes to support the above finding. 4. Linking remittances to economic resilience in the presence of altruistic motives. An interesting hypothesis is tested to ascertain whether there is any systematic association between remittances and strong and weak economic resilience. A negative relationship would establish the presence of altruistic motive underlying international remittances by migrant population. In other words, migrants help the weak motherland (low economic resilience) by higher remittances. In the case of a positive relationship, economic motives are discovered. This econometric investigation would involve developing an instrumental variable framework. 2SLS estimates are analysed. Our findings do not support the contention that altruistic motives are significant. These results are common to different groups of SIDs. 5. What is the impact of migrants’ remittances on public infrastructure development? It is found that despite leakages, these funds provide budgetary support to capital expenditures when foreign aid is taken into account. This would work through effective use of foreign aid and higher domestic resource mobilization in the presence of migrant remittances. This is an interesting finding because international financial flows (here foreign aid migrants’ remittances) may have a tendency to reinforce each other. This could be simply because both are routed through the government and central banking channels. 6. In the final part of the paper, policy issues are discussed. International remittances are important source of capital in all countries. It is however difficult to model the behaviour of migrant labour for the benefit of policymaking. Countries which gain from these transfers can consolidate on these benefits. In particular small, island states, and developing countries have initiated aggressive campaigns to influence international migrants. This is perhaps a good strategy for designing policies having positive impacts on economic resilience of financially weak countries.

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2005

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Demographic and Regional Dimensions of the Incidence of Residential Water Charges: The Case of Mauritius”, in 52nd Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, USA, 2005.[Abstract]


This paper presents empirical results on progressive incidence of water charges that contradict conventional wisdom in developing countries and many developed countries (Whittington, 1992, 2003; Boland and Whittington, 2000). Water pricing policy is shown to possess the potential of redistribution. This finding is supported by traditional incidence exercise incorporating family size and metering, linear expenditure systems approach and error correction methodology. Family size among high income categories relative to low-income groups is larger in Mauritius. Because of this unusual demographic dimension, increasing block tariffs coupled with lifeline rates that are below long run marginal cost applicable to low-volume users produce this different result. It is important to document that extensive metering both in urban and rural areas allows low income consumers to benefit from increasing block tariffs. Regional disparities among residential water users further contribute to redistributive strategy. More precisely rural low-income households are subsidised by higher income consumers who reside predominantly in urban regions. A comparative analysis of price and income elasticities for different income categories reveals that low income households face more than average price elasticity of demand for water and less than average income elasticity. In the light of this result, it is established that increase in demand for water among richer households has the potential of improving equity in water charges. The computed marginal budget shares derived from linear expenditure system shows that the amount of supernumerary income would be higher for richer people so that a percentage increase in income may result in a higher level of spending on water as compared to lower-income households. In this case, water charges are found to be re-distributive.

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2005

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Taxing international tourist for the coastal environment: The case of Mauritius”, in Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (USA), 2005.

2005

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Measuring coastal damage and planning for sustainable international tourism management in the Island of Mauritius”, in Indian Ocean Marine Environment Conference, University of Western Australia in Perth (Australia), 2005.

2004

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Spatial Dimensions of Government Spending in Small Islands : The case of Mauritius”, in 51st Annual Conference of North American Regional Science International, University of Washington, Seattle (USA), 2004.

2003

Conference Paper

Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Explaining Mauritian Growth”, in African Economic Research Consortium Workshop on Explaining African Economic Growth Performance, Kenya, 2003.

2003

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Urban governance - central vs. local government efficiency in providing urban public services: A case study of Mauritius”, in Research Committee 21 Meeting on Urban and Regional Development, University of Milan, Italy, 2003.

2001

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Modeling wages under neoclassical distortions, The case of Mauritius”, in 15th Meeting of European Society for Population Economics, Athens University of Business and Economics, Athens (Greece), 2001.

2001

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Socio economic disparities in city states, A case study of Mauritius”, in Research Committee Meeting on Regional and Urban Development on the theme Social Inequalities, Re-distributive Justice and the City, Amsterdam Study Centre for the Metropolitan Environment, University of Amsterdam, 2001.

1999

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Export-led growth and labor markets in emerging economies: The case of Mauritius”, in International Conference on Globalization, Economic Reform and Development in Asia-Pacific Region, University of Western Sydney, 1999.

1998

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “A model of local fiscal assignment: Some empirical results for Mauritius”, in 54th Congress of International Institute of Public Finance, Cordoba, Argentina, 1998.

1997

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Coastal resources, the environment and international tourists”, in International Workshop on Coastal Resources and Economic Development, Zanzibar, 1997.

1997

Conference Paper

M. Wrede and Shyam Nath, “Efficiency of local goods provision”, in 53rd Congress of the International Institute of Public Finance, Kyoto University, Japan, 1997.

1996

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “New urban forms: Economic and social dimensions”, in ISA Research Committee Conference on Regional and Urban Development, University of Queensland, Brisbane, (Australia) , 1996.

1996

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Industrialization and labor market trends – A case Study of Mauritius”, in Commonwealth Geographical Bureau Conference on Vanishing Borders, Department of Geography, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), 1996.

1995

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Urbanization and employment structure change in African economies: An analysis of policy options with special reference to Mauritius”, in UNU/WIDER Workshop on Changing Employment Patterns and the Structure of Unemployment in Africa, Ghana, Africa, 1995.

1995

Conference Paper

S. K. Sobhee and Shyam Nath, “Foreign aid and public fiscal behavior: A case study of Mauritius”, in Econometric Society 7th World Congress, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan), 1995.

1993

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “International tourist population as a tax base: The case of Mauritius”, in 7th Annual Conference of the European Society for Population Economics, Demographic Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary), 1993.

1993

Conference Paper

P. Ganguly and Shyam Nath, “Optimal Mix of Urban Public services: A Game Theoretic Approach”, in Far Eastern Conference of Econometric Society, The Academia Sinica, Institute of Economics, Taipei (Taiwan), 1993.

1991

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Privatization of municipal services in India: Facts and issues”, in CIRIEC Conference, University of Liege (Belgium), 1991.

1990

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Local fiscal response to expenditure reassignment and fiscal decentralization in India”, in 46th Congress of the International Institute of Public Finance, Brussels (Belgium), 1990.

1990

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Local fiscal adjustment and state grants policy: An empirical analysis”, in Twenty-Seventh Indian Econometric Conference, Department of Economics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, 1990.

1988

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Rent control policy and urban housing”, in 2-day Seminar on Issues in Urban Housing and Transport, CIRIEC India/ Society for Development Studies, India International Centre, New Delhi, 1988.

1988

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “An alternative to Octroi”, in Seminar on Octroi – Problem and Prospects, Shivaji University, Kolahapur, 1988.

1987

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “State fiscal response to external aid for plan projects under the concept of additionality”, in 2-day Seminar on Issues in Resource Mobilization for Planning, 1987.

1986

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Housing and urbanization: Economic and social dimensions - A Brief Note”, in Workshop on Housing in Urban Development, Indian Council of Social Science Research, New Delhi, 1986.

1985

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Provision of urban public services: An economic analysis of municipal government vs. autonomous board”, in National Workshop on Urban Finance, NIPFP, New Delhi, 1985.

1985

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Property tax as a source of urban finance”, in National Workshop on Urban Finance, NIPFP, New Delhi, 1985.

1982

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Metropolitan growth and management in India with reference to local finance - A study of the property tax in Calcutta”, in Conference on Urbanisation and National Development, East West Centre, Population Research Institute, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, USA, 1982.

1980

Conference Paper

Shyam Nath, “Indian Economic Policy”, in Eastern Economic Association Annual Conference, Montreal (Canada), 1980 (Discussant’s paper), 1980.

Publication Type: Journal Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2020

Journal Article

Dr. Avinash Shivdas, Dileep G. Menon, and Chitra S. Nair, “Antecedents of Acceptance and Use of a Digital Library System: Experience from a Tier 3 Indian City”, The Electronic Library, vol. ahead-of-print., no. ahead-of-print., 2020.[Abstract]


Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to examine the critical factors that drive the adoption of digital library system (DLS) in institutes located in remote India. An integrated model of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model-2 (UTAUT2) and information systems success model (ISSM) is used to evaluate the critical factors.

Design/methodology/approach
The survey method of research was used, and the data collected was analysed by using PLS-SEM, which proved helpful to evaluate and validate the model.

Findings
Departing from past research, where most of the factors of the UTAUT2 and ISSM were found to influence the adoption of DLS, in this context, it is noted that performance expectancy, facilitating conditions and habit were the only constructs that influenced the intention to use DLS.

Originality/value
The study addresses the requirement for further research in DLS domain in emerging markets. It is one of the few studies addressing DLS adoption in remote India. The findings are unique to this context, which differ from developed nations, thus, answering the call to advance UTAUT model.

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2020

Journal Article

Dr. Saswat Barpannda and Neena Sreekumar, “Performance Analysis of Hospitals in Kerala Using DEA Model”, Journal Of Health management (forthcoming), vol. 22, no. 1, 2020.

2020

Journal Article

Dr. Saswat Barpannda and Susmita Mukhopadhyay, “Does Firmography Patterns Human Resource Practice? Evidence from Microfinance Industry of India.”, Asian Journal of Empirical Research, vol. 10, pp. 24-39, 2020.

2019

Journal Article

Dr. Rajiv Nair, Mohammad Muttakin, Arifur Khan, Nava Subramaniam, and Dr. V. S. Somanath, “Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure and Financial Transparency: Evidence from India”, Pacific-Basin Finance Journal (ABDC - A Category), vol. 56, pp. 330 - 351, 2019.[Abstract]


Disclosures are expected to foster financial transparency and improve the quality of information available to investors. Previous research has examined the role of non-financial disclosures in achieving this goal. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure has been widely employed as representative of non-financial disclosure. Recent legislation in some countries mandating non-financial disclosure makes this debate even more pertinent. We investigate the role of CSR disclosure in financial transparency in India, where mandatory CSR disclosure is required for firms to meet the thresholds set by the Companies Act 2013. Our investigation straddles mandatory disclosure regime and considers different classes of investors. Our findings suggest that CSR disclosure improves financial transparency during mandatory disclosure regime. We also find that ownership by the retail investors strengthens the association between CSR disclosure and financial transparency. However, we fail to document any significant effects of ownership by the institutional investors on the association between CSR disclosure and financial transparency.

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2019

Journal Article

Karthika S. and Dr. Rajiv Nair, “Does Mandatory CSR Legislation Facilitate Earnings Management? Evidence from India”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering , vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 2865-2868, 2019.[Abstract]


This study examines the association between mandatory corporate social responsibility (CSR) and earnings management. The Government of India mandated all industries to spend and disclose CSR through the Indian Companies Act 2013 with effect from financial year 2014. Management has an incentive to manage reported earnings and avoid fluctuations in reported income as investors prefer firms reporting steady growth in income. We use panel data from a sample of 80 Indian non-financial companies over the period 2014 to 2017. We investigate the possibility of using unspent CSR funds for earnings management. Earnings management calculated using the coefficient of variation method is regressed against unspent CSR and control variables such as Size, Market to Book (MB), Return on Assets (ROA) and Leverage (LEV) to evaluate the effect of unspent CSR on earnings management. We expect a positive association between unspent (carried forward) CSR funds and earnings management. Our findings indicate that companies may use unspent CSR funds to manage reported earnings. This study provides evidence to policymakers and enforcement authorities that mandating CSR spending could have unintended consequences such as facilitating earnings management and thus impeding the financial transparency.

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2019

Journal Article

G. Archa Sreekumar and Dr. Rajiv Nair, “Capital Structure Decision and Survival of Firms: A Dividend Approach”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering , vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 81-86, 2019.[Abstract]


Capital structure decisions create a lot of challenges to the firms. One of the most important strategic decisions is to reach an integral mix of debt and equity, in-order to form an optimal capital structure. However the debt and the equity have a huge impact on the survival of the firm. The present literature provides a positive relation between the capital structure and the survival of the firm. The paper examines this association in an Indian context using a sample size of 50 companies in the manufacturing sector. The dividend of the firms is considered as the determinant for the survival of the firms. The results show that there is no relationship between the capital structure and the survival of the firms. There might be other factors which affect the capital structure of the firms.

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2019

Journal Article

M. Venkata Amuktha and Dr. Rajiv Nair, “Corporate Social Responsibility and Shareholder Wealth- Evidence From Indian Manufacturing Sector”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering , vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 3335-3340, 2019.[Abstract]


Corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosures became mandatory in India, from April 2014. The Companies Act (2013) specifies the modus to determine the quantum and nature of CSR expenditure and requires that affected companies disclose these details in their audited annual reports. Extant literature generally documents a positive association between CSR and shareholder value. Our study researches this association in an Indian context using a sample of top 100 (by market capitalization) manufacturing companies. Manufacturing industry contributes to environmental pollution and social costs; hence CSR could contribute towards mitigating the societal impact of corporate activities, maintaining trust and increasing shareholder value. External value measures are used by modern investors to assess company’s current and prospective ability to maximize shareholder value. Therefore, we consider Dividend paid and Tobin’s Q as the determinants of shareholder value. We find that CSR is positively associated with dividend payout and Tobin’s Q. The results seem to reinforce prior research findings that shareholder value can be increased by CSR.

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2019

Journal Article

Sougata Ray, Dr. Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra, and Shyam Nath, “Over-indebtedness and its Drivers among Microfinance Borrowers in India”, Economic and Political Weekly (ABDC - B Category), vol. 54, no. 7, pp. 47-54, 2019.[Abstract]


In microfinance markets worldwide, over-indebtedness among borrowers and households has emerged as an important concern. Over-indebtedness, measured in terms of sacrifices made by households, is high in both rural and urban India. Factors statistically significant in explaining over-indebtedness are the borrower’s age and financial literacy; the household’s entrepreneurial activity, income level, and spatial location; and the proportion of dependent members in a household.

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2019

Journal Article

Dr. Saswat Barpannda and Mridula Thamatoor, “Knowledge Transfer in Non-profit Organisations: A Qualitative Study”, International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, vol. 13, p. 25, 2019.[Abstract]


In this 21st century, the importance of knowledge transfer is evident in all the organisation. There are two reasons. First, knowledge appears to be an increasing proportion of the total asset. Second, the advance in information technology has created new means of knowledge transfer. Effective knowledge transfer can improve the organisation performance and gain competitive advantage. There is only a limited research done on the knowledge transfer in non-profit organisations. This paper tries to highlight the relevance of knowledge transfer and the factors contributing to it in non-profit organisations and how it shapes various organisational processes. A qualitative study has been used in this research considering 4 non-governmental organisations in the Southern state of Kerala, India. The primary data has been collected through unstructured interview and the secondary data from the reports, newsletters, articles, organisational, and websites. Content analysis and other exploratory methods using Nvivo software have been used to analyse the data. The outcome of the study would be to provide a framework that intends to help the non-profit organisations to plan, conduct and evaluate the efforts which are used to transfer knowledge with others.

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2019

Journal Article

D. Saswat Barpanda and Bhagya Lakshmi Unnithan, “Relationship of Employee’s Perception on Health and Safety Measures and Job Performance: the Mediating Effects of Job Satisfaction”, International Journal of Environment, Workplace and Employment , vol. 5, no. 2, 2019.[Abstract]


There are companies who do not focus much on the health and safety measures of the employees, because of which there are higher rates of accidents or injuries which leads to lower productivity of employees and dissatisfaction in the job. Thus, the present study was being conducted to determine the relationship of employee's perception on health and safety measures and its influence on job performance. Further, the role of job satisfaction as a mediator is being explored. The study was being conducted among 167 respondents in two manufacturing companies in Kerala, India. The data analysed using principal component analysis, correlation, and regression. The study showed a strong influence of employee's perception on health and safety measure towards job satisfaction and employee performance and a mediating effect of job satisfaction was also evident.

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2019

Journal Article

Sougata Ray and Sushanta Mohapatra, “Asset Quality and Performance: An Empirical Study of Indian Microfinance Institutions”, International Journal of Services, Economics and Management, vol. 10, no. 3, p. 248, 2019.[Abstract]


The objective of the study is to analyse the impact of the asset quality on the financial performance of the Indian microfinance institutions. Using the financial data of 76 'for-profit' Indian MFIs from the microfinance information exchange database for the period 2006 to 2013, we observe that the quality of asset deteriorated significantly during the period of study and it has impacted the performance of the MFIs negatively. The commercialisation of the MFIs resulted in predatory lending and unfair debt collection practices ensuring better repayment rates. These practices, however, resulted in client defaults and an increase in both portfolio-at-risk and write-off ratio. The study, therefore, suggests that the MFIs need to re-examine and realign their operations so that social parameters are given due importance in every aspect of lending activity. This will ensure that MFIs achieve their social objective as well as ensure higher repayment rates.

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2019

Journal Article

Sougata Ray, “Challenges and Changes in Indian Rural Credit Market: A Review”, Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 79, pp. 338-352, 2019.[Abstract]


Purpose – Post-independence, the rural credit market in India has undergone significant structural changes in order to enhance the availability and efficient use of credit. The purpose of this paper is to understand the challenges and changes in the Indian rural credit market in the post-independence period. Design/methodology/approach – Using data from the All India Debt and Investment Survey conducted by the National Sample Survey Organisation of the Government of India from 1971–1972 to 2012 and Reserve Bank of India in 1951–1952 and 1961–1962, the study focuses on three important aspect of rural credit market, i.e. the availability, sources and uses of credit. The analysis is based on both the national and state level data and uses the decadal growth rates to explain the changes in the rural credit market. Findings – Availability of credit, in terms of volume and number of households indebted, has increased substantially. However, the sharp rise in outstanding debt is a matter of concern. The share of credit from institutional agencies has seen a continuous decline post liberalisation. The non-institutional agencies, particularly the professional moneylenders, continue to be the most preferred sources of credit owing to their flexible nature of operation. Interesting, microfinance has emerged as a major source of credit particularly for the poor rural households. The rise in credit usage for non-income generating activities amongst poor households is another important concern. Originality/value – The study highlights some of the most important features and characteristics associated with the Indian rural credit market.

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2019

Journal Article

Anju Kamal, “Organizational Metaphors – the Case of Organization Development Intervention at ABC Business School”, ON Research - Journal of EU Business School , vol. 3, pp. 67-72, 2019.[Abstract]


The objective of this case study is to explore the application of organizational metaphors in realistic contexts. Metaphors define the realities that we exist in. Metaphors give teams and institutions an orientation of direction, definition of their past and principles for existence. They help answer queries about the organization like, “What is my Organization like - is it a family, a prison? or a jungle? To what kind of Organization am I contributing to? According to Gareth Morgan (1986), Aristotle was among the earliest to recognize the role that metaphors play in the creation of knowledge. To extend our understanding about Organizations, in the book Images of Organizations, Morgan (1986, 1997) presents eight metaphorical images: machines, organisms, brains, cultures, political systems, psychic prisons, flux and transformation and instruments of domination. The unit of investigation in this study is the Organization called as ABC Business School. Data for developing the case was gathered through observation, formal documents and from interactions with the stakeholders in the case. Through the analysis of the case of Organizational Development Intervention at ABC Business School, this study concludes that ABC Business School can be depicted through the brain metaphor. The study asserts the fact that ABC school adopts the double loop learning characteristic of brain metaphor where the learning focus is on the adjustment of models, approaches, and continuous learning in order to respond to changing circumstances. This study which looks at the application of organizational metaphors in realistic contexts also offer further insights into the suggestions and evidences as to who are the stake holders involved in running and leading organizations towards prosperity and growth.

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2019

Journal Article

Akshay Prakash and Dr. Avinash Shivdas, “A Model On Understanding Mobile Buying Behaviour Of Migrant Workers With Consideration To Kerala Region”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 649-653, 2019.[Abstract]


Mobile phones have become the part and parcel of human life and it was once considered to be a luxury and now it has become a necessity and with this there have been a large number of companies and India is one of the leading markets for mobile phones based on several factors and there are large number of companies offering medium range phones to this segment. It has become a bit difficult for people to choose mobile phones and also companies are finding it challenging to differentiate from the clutter, so the companies will have to understand the factors that influence the purchase decision of audience and in the recent past there has been a large increase in migrant laborers traveling across India and this segment has a unique set off filters based on which they select mobile phones. This paper aims at understanding how this market of migrant laborers choose mobile phones and what factors influence their choice and for this purpose migrant laborers located in tier two and tier three city were selected. one of the major differences found from other papers is the importance of advertisement being in the top priorities of the factors affecting the buying behavior. The other factors that affect the buying decision are camera, storage, battery, offers, experience etc. this study gives an insight to the migrant labour market.

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2019

Journal Article

Brijesh Salil and Soni Vivek, “Generation Y Consumer Perception of Patanjali Products in Kerala”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. 266-270, 2019.[Abstract]


FMCG is one of the sectors which are rapidly rising all over the world. There are many FMCG companies in India including Hindustan Unilever (HUL), Procter & Gamble (P&G), India tobacco company (ITC), Patanjali, etc.The objective of the study is to understand the consumer perception of Patanjali products in Kerala, India. The primary data was collected from a structured questionnaire with 100 respondents. The major finding in the study says that Quality and Natural product are the two main things that influences customer to buy Patanjali products in Kerala. Further analysis brought out the whether the Patanjali will sustain in the market or not, majority of the people told that they will buy the product again and they will recommend the product to their friends and relatives. So with this we can say that the Patanjali products will sustain in Kerala market.

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2019

Journal Article

Jobin V. Jacob and Soni Vivek, “A Work on Women Empowerment with Special Reference to Kerala”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 1004-1010, 2019.[Abstract]


Self help group (SHG) is the tool to alleviate poverty in a fast developing nation like India. Different initiatives of SHG like small scale business ventures, microfinance initiatives is gaining tremendous amount of popularity because of their incredible positive effect on women empowerment. The objective of this paper: To review and existing literature on topic of Self Help Group (SHG) and microfinance in India and to analyse impact of SHG on women upliftment and empowerment in parayakadavu village of kollam district in Kerala. For this investigation primary data is collected. Primary data constitutes of hundred women respondents, who was selected out of 20 SHG operating in parayakadavu village.Data was collected in February, 2019.Findings showed that there is tremendous impact on women empowerment in parayakadavu village through SHG in terms of increase in saving habits, decision making skills, income level etc..

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2019

Journal Article

Govind A. Nair and Soni Vivek, “Analysis of Construction Safety Management in India and UAE”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 848-852, 2019.[Abstract]


The major concern in construction industry is safety because injuries to individuals, organization and societies will bring great loss as whole. This paper aims to focus the effectiveness of factors that influences the safety management practices adopted by the construction firms in India and UAE. The paper is examined using Comparative analysis with two hundred samples. As paper revealed that the India has comparatively less safety measures than UAE. To minimize the risk the government should implement laws towards safety and security for workers; provide the training to site officers. Researchers from the previous studies had explained the countries like Italy, Australia and China has provided new technological method to provide safety for their employees

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2019

Journal Article

Adarsh Ullas and Soni Vivek, “Fake Branding: A Study on MBA Student’s Perception towards Counterfeiting Products”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 155-158, 2019.[Abstract]


The Counterfeiting or Fake brands is regarded as one of the historical crime in the Indian history. Accordingly this paper explores how the customer is motivated to purchase fake brands For This, A Data has been collected with a respondent of 100 students who are currently pursuing MBA from Amrita school of Business, Amritapuri. Each respondent have their own point of view which differs through Gender. The test was based on electronic goods, clothing, drinks and cosmetics. Result shows the concern related to health, disappointment, risk and integrity are the most important countervailing factor on behaviour intention towards counterfeits. Gender also has an explanatory force. Counterfeits is also not an explanatory force of any single entity but a shared responsibility. Counterfeits are one of the major factors that are becoming common nowadays in the modern world especially in students.

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2019

Journal Article

M. S. Jeevandas, Lekshmi D. Nai, and Soni Vivek, “Impact of Green Marketing on Consumer Purchase Intention and Sustainable Development”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 165-169, 2019.[Abstract]


Today, the term "eco-friendly” is a prevalent and most alluring word within general population over the globe. As we are now aware about the harm mankind is creating to environment, the eco friendly and green products are gaining popularity. Sustainable development is yet another common term in this era. This study conducted in the southern districts of Kerala focuses on how green marketing leads to purchase intention of the products and then towards sustainable development. Even though the term green marketing is not familiar within Keralites, they are much passionate about eco friendly or green products. A sample of 200 was collected and analysed using average percentages, correlation and chi-square tests so as to determine how green marketing tools improves purchase intention of the customers, trust of customers towards ecolabelling and also to understand how green marketing and sustainable development are interrelated. The results after analysis of data disclosed there are a large number of prospective customers for green products and subsequently their number can be increased with increased initiatives in green marketing activities. The conclusions from the study can be additionally used to dissect the influence of green marketing on the purchase motivation of the customers in different areas, accordingly adding to a supportable improvement of the economy.

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2019

Journal Article

Maheshwar Pratap and S. N. Sabjan, “The Implementation of TPM on Manufacturing Performance at FMCG Company”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, vol. 8, 2019.[Abstract]


The focus of this paper is to enlighten the commitments of Quality Maintenance Pillar of TPM in increasing the product quality in a FMCG industry involved in the manufacturing of HDPE bottles and coconut oil. QM pillar is a critical activity of the TPM approach which expects to delight the customer through zero defect manufacturing. TPM that is effectively implemented increases the production efficiency with an ultimate aim of achieving zero losses, zero breakdown and zero defects. The main aim of QM pillar is to eliminate the non-conformances in a methodical way and maintain the equipment for high quality products. Activities involved with QM pillar was able to decrease the customer complaints and regulatory complaints to zero. The targets put forward by the QM pillar was effectively achieved by the industry, the targets included maintaining the customer complaints at zero, reduce the in process defects by 50% and increase the production of Total value of goods worth 50 lakhs to one crore worth SKU.

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2019

Journal Article

Poonthamil R. and Maheshwar Pratap, “Optimization of Instrumental Workflow in CSSD at Hospital Sector”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering (IJITEE), vol. 8, no. 4, 2019.[Abstract]


Theobjective of this paper is to analyze the existing instrument workflow of CSSD [Central Sterile Supply Department] and to suggest the optimized workflow solutions for the hospital. We need to study about CSSDand what are the various activities which takes placethere along with the timings they required for each activity. By knowing those, we need to find out the critical and non-critical activities to create a map.The basic outline of the map is that the instruments from OT [Operation Theatre] to TSSD [Theatrical Sterile Supply Department], TSSD to CSSD, then CSSD to TSSD and TSSD to OT store. In detail, we will study about each area how the instruments are moving, and how much time it consumes.For that we need to create an existing workflow with the lean tool called VSM [Value Stream Mapping] and in that pick out the critical and non–critical activities. We can remove the non– critical activities and create a new workflow.With the new workflow we will form the Program Evaluation & Review Technique model which helps to know the percentage of efficiency has been improved in accordance to the existing workflow. With this solution, we can propose a new workflow of Instruments with the minimized critical activity and time period for the activities which takes place in CSSD of the hospital sector. Keywords: Value Stream Mapping, Program Evaluation and Review Technique, Optimized Workflow

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2019

Journal Article

Maheshwar Pratap and Naveen Kumar K., “Identifying Durability Failure Parts using 24 Months-In-Service Data: A Case-Based Empirical Study from an Automobile Manufacturer in India”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering (IJITEE), vol. 8, no. 4, 2019.[Abstract]


This paper analyses the warranty claims data to identify faulty parts contributing to increasing failure using Weibull Analysis, in the automobile industry. Unlike studies in the past, this study uses 24 month service data to investigate the cause of failure due to faulty parts.Usually, the forecasting of the part failure is done for the 3 months in service (MIS) data and the automobile manufacturers use this parameter to set Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for quality improvement among design engineers. The KPI set using 3MIS data is used to determine 12 MIS and 24MIS KPIs. The period used in the development of KPIs affects the number of failed parts to be selected for improvement. As the monitoring period of countermeasure takes long durations, the repetitive failures added in data during the monitoring period, make the analysis complicated. Also, the seasonal pattern of failures cannot be addressed using 3MIS data. By increasing the analysis period to 24MIS, this paper finds evidence that increase in MIS leads to the identification of faulty parts that are causing repeated failures. The scope of the study extends towardsthe detection of new issues and towards monitoringthe effectiveness of existing countermeasures.This reduces warranty costs for the manufacturer and provides time to develop appropriate countermeasures along with increased monitoring period of failure parts leading to durability quality improvement

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2019

Journal Article

Dr. Avinash Shivdas and Karthik Illikotil, “A Model on the Factors that Drives the Smartphone Demand from the Retailer’s Perspective, Thrissur”, International Journal of Recent Technology and Engineering, vol. 8, no. 1, 2019.[Abstract]


Purpose Mobile phone markets in india is witnessing one of the most challenging phases in its evolution. The economic growth added with the rise in disposable income has seen consumers demand more smartphones than in the past. To keep up with this demand companies are expanding and developing their distributional channels across rural and urban india. Though there have been several studies on the consumer purchase side, there has been scant research on the role of the retailer. This study aims at understanding the factors that drive the demand of smartphones from the perspective of retailers and their ecosystem Design/methodology/approach – to evaluate the role of actors including the retailers in the ecosystem, a holistic approach is needed. Systems theory was found suitable to evaluate the interactions and the roles of players in this ecosystems. The interview method was adopted to develop the model and understand the nuances of the interactions between the actors. Findings – Evaluating factors based from literature as well as interview transcripts, it was seen that trade margins, functional value of smartphones, inventory turnover and brand awareness were major factors propelling demand among retailers. Originality/value – This study advances the body of knowledge by presenting drivers of demand for smartphones from the retailer perspective, which is under researched, especially in the emerging market context. The implications from this study could serve as a platform for future research in similar economies and further shed light on influencing factors that could aid in enhancing market development activities for practitioners. Further the emerging market context of the study provides insights to industry and academia to advance research in This study provides insights on the factors which have an effect on the increased demand of certain smartphone brands from the retailer side and can be a basis to understand the strategies which mobile brands follows to adopt for increased penetration in Indian market. This study concentrates on the retailer’s perspective and only limited studies have been done on this.

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2018

Journal Article

Anju Kamal and Souhreda Radhakrishnan, “Individual Learning Preferences Based on Personality Traits in an E-learning Scenario”, Education and Information Technologies, Springer Nature (Scopus), vol. 24, pp. 407–435, 2018.[Abstract]


Differences in styles of learning have become important considerations at all levels of education over the last several years. Examining college students' preferred style of learning is useful for course design and effective instructional methods. Using the Felder-Silverman Index of Learning Styles (ILS), and MBTI Inventories we investigate the relationship between personality traits and learning styles among millennial students in an e-learning scenario. Personality evaluation may serve as a valuable apparatus in counseling and guiding the students. This study will help the instructors to understand the personality of students and hence the courses offered can be designed with keeping in mind personality traits of students that help students to engage more in learning. The participants of the study were tested on the Personality dimensions of extrovert/introvert, sensing/intuitive, thinking/feeling, judging/ perceiving using MBTI and learning dimensions of whether a person has active/reflective, sensing/intuitive, verbal/visual, sequential/global learning style using Felder-Silverman Index of Learning Styles. The empirical analysis reveals that all the variables of MBTI i.e. Extrovert/Introvert, Sensing/Intuitive, Thinking/Feeling, Judging/Perceiving are positively correlated with Active /Reflective, Sensing/Intuitive, Verbal/Visual, Sequential /Global respectively. The paper identifies teaching strategies for e-learning courses while recognizing the four learning styles based on personality traits. From the study it can be concluded that the effectiveness of e-learning courses can be improved by providing instruction in a manner consistent with each student's learning style according to their personality traits. The findings have implications for both full-time educators and practitioners because firms also provide considerable amounts of continuing education for their professionals in an online setting through training modules.

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2018

Journal Article

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Pro-environmental Behaviours at Workplace: An Empirical Study in Indian Manufacturing Organizations”, Benchmarking: An International Journal (ABDC - B Category), vol. 25, no. 9, pp. 3743 - 3766, 2018.[Abstract]


Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the influence of individual and organisational factors on pro-environmental behaviours of the employees at the workplace.Design/methodology/approach A model explaining pro-environmental behaviours at workplace has been proposed based on contemporary literature related to value-belief-norm (VBN) theory, corporate environmentalism framework and norm. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 20 manufacturing organisations in India and 383 useful individual responses were collected. The proposed model has been tested with the help of structural regression analysis.Findings The results of the study show that both individual characteristics as well as organisational efforts influence employees’ pro-environmental behaviours. However, the effect varies as per the type of behaviour. Personal norm mediates the relationship between subjective social norm and two types of pro-environmental behaviours.Research limitations/implications An individual faces subjective or objective constraints while exhibiting pro-environmental behaviours. The effect of subjective or the objective constraint needs to be explored in future studies.Originality/value To explain pro-environmental behaviours at workplace the authors tested VBN theory, as it was overlooked till date in management literature. It also contributes to the VBN literature by extending it to include organisational variables like corporate environmentalism and social psychological variable like social norm.

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2018

Journal Article

Karthik C. Menon, Dileep G. Menon, and Remya Vivek Menon, “Indian Electricity Power Market (Iex, Kerala Region) Spot Price: Forecasting using ARIMA Model”, Journal of Advanced Research in Dynamical and Control Systems, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 483-490, 2018.[Abstract]


Electricity traded as a commodity have distinct characteristics of being completely fungible, simultaneous in a generation to usage & at any given time, there should be a near perfect supply-demand equilibrium in the power grids. Smart grids use ancillary services & demand response programs to manage any demand fluctuations. Independent System Operators (ISOs) & Regional Transmission Organisations (RTO) are responsible for keeping the grid balanced with generation & load. Power Grid Corporation (ISO), Indian Energy Exchange (ISO) & Kerala State Electricity Board (RTO) are the key players who perform this function for Kerala region. IEX manage the energy markets by operating three submarkets day-ahead, real-time& capacity markets. Through day-ahead market, electricity generators &load-serving entities submit their bids to receive & offer electricity to the power grid based on varying cost on each hour for the next operating day. In the real-time market, ISO & RTOs manage these changes in production & consumption throughout the day. They optimize the generation dispatch schedule where they consider generation cost & transmission constraints. Capacity markets are employed to have study flow of capital investments in the market thereby increasing the generation capacity. Currently, KSEB forecast & schedule power generation to ensure sufficient power is available at its disposal for transmission. But with generation capacity standing at a mere 30% of demand, it has to depend upon bulk purchases. To bring transparency to KSEB�s procurement programme, the Kerala state regulatory commission (erc Kerala) have provided adequate guidelines to consider commodity markets as well along with its traditional flat-ratecontracts. On this research study, we are forecasting day-ahead electricity spot price at IEX Kerala region using modern electrometric techniques. The time series analysis of Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model is applied to the historical IEX spot price data starting from 1st February 2017 to 31st January of 2018. In every deregulated electricity market, it�s a practice to perform the price forecasting first and then to prepare the bids accordingly. KSEB can also apply this technique to improve their procurement efficiency. From 2017 onwards, IEX has created a new separate bid region for the Kerala market, making Kerala specific market study very relevant.

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2017

Journal Article

H. J. Bhate and Dr. Avinash Shivdas, “Analysis of Critical Success Factors of Laundromats in Emerging Economies like India: An Application of Gap Analysis”, International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research, vol. 15, pp. 159-170, 2017.[Abstract]


Evaluation of customers' perception and satisfaction of service quality is widely acknowledged as being a favorable strategy in the laundry industry. In recent years, the Laundromats in India have encountered difficult times due to the increasing customer demands, and due to the strong growing internal industry competition development. However, the industry's main concern around the globe is to cater for its customer needs and their desires, which are mostly addressed through personal services. Research on service quality of such a specialized sector is scare. The present research paper aims to fill this gap by conducting a comprehensive analysis of the laundry sector in India and provide an assessment of service quality suggested by Grönroos (1982; 1990). Servqual is being used to understand the gap between the provider and the customer of this scantly researched industry. The major findings indicate that areas where laundromats in India will have to focus in on reduction of defects and the margin of error. In case of errors, the compensation mechanism should be in place to retain customers. Secondly, the customers are too occupied in their daily routines and will not be ready to wait for delivery or collection of clothes. Hence, waiting time reduction at points of collection and delivery is another critical factor that determines the success of a laundromat in India.

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2017

Journal Article

Soni Vivek and Amrith V., “Spirituality and Productivity - A Relationship Perspective”, Purusharta, vol. 10, pp. 60-69, 2017.[Abstract]


Spirituality and its practices are the real gems of value additions in the human life, they helps in building a strong foundation and getting a greater clarity. Spirituality is not a limited concept but expansive like a vast blue ocean. Spirituality, being currently becoming an attracting trend when considered with organizations, many of the organizations prefer in deploying spiritual functions and practices aiming for a good level of perspicacity and growth in their future forecasts and operations for the enablement of delivering a good level of productivity. This study aims at examining the connectivity existence or non-existence between some organizational productivity factors that directly or indirectly contributes to productivity levels and the factors of spiritual intelligence. For the study a controlled experiment was conducted, the 4 factors of spiritual intelligence such as Critical Existential Thinking, Personal Meaning Production, Transcendental awareness, Conscious State of Expansion was considered and measured by taking an organization after that 4 factors that contributes directly or indirectly to productivity function such as Ability to address day to day Variations, Adherence in task accomplishment at extreme workload scenarios with equanimity, Consistency level in Benchmark achievement or meeting the provided/ defined target levels, ability in performance beyond the expected level in logical Operations were consulted and measured. After this a pairing was made with a deep look of these factors and each pair consisted of different predictors and a response variables, 4 regression models were developed in Minitab with these in order to check whether there was any connectivity/relationship existence between any one of the factors between the grouped four pairs each (i.e. to check at least 1 predictor - response relationship existence was there or not in all 4 regression models developed). The result signalled the existence of relationship between at least 3 factors to at most 5 factors in all the model, marking a green signal of relationship existences. © 2017, School of Management Sciences. All rights reserved.

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2017

Journal Article

Dileep G. Menon and Vijith Nair, “Fin Tech firms-A New Challenge to Traditional Banks: A Review”, International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research , vol. 15, pp. 173-184, 2017.[Abstract]


Banks, as we know, have been around for hundreds of years and controlled the market of financial services. But now the functioning of banks have been affected by the rapid advancement in technology. There has been a drastic change in not only making finance more secure but also making it better for its customers. Financial technology or FinTech has developed as a new financial services industry in India. This industry consists of companies that use technology to provide financial services. These companies operate in various sectors like wealth management, insurance, payments sector etc. The different technological interventions that have been introduced to personal and commercial finance by these FinTech companies was facilitated in part due to the expansion in the mobile internet market. The ways the banks used to serve their customers have been affected by these non-banking service providers as the traditional banking methods are not seen as enough to meet the ever increasing expectations of the customers along with earning profits. Nowadays banks are ever-changing beneath the influence of latest technologies and innovative finance market players like these Fin Tech firms. Some of these banks are joining hands with Fintech start-ups to boost their services. Some invest in young firms or produce their own start-up accelerators to support and use these new technologies and derive benefits from this. This study is undertaken to understand the growth of FinTech firms and the challenges faced by traditional banks due to emergence of FinTech firms by analyzing forty two peer reviewed journal articles available in EBSCO and Science Direct.

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2017

Journal Article

Dileep G. Menon, Sougata Ray, and Nandu Narayan, “An Empirical Study on Access and Use of Technology-Based Money Transfer Mechanisms among Migrant Workers in Kerala”, International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research , vol. 15, pp. 173-185, 2017.[Abstract]


Since the formation of money, the ability to transfer it from one place to another or “Velocity of Money” had been the backbone of an economy. It has facilitated in the creation of wealth through job creation, trade practices and economic activities. With the advancement of mobile technologies and devices, individuals are now able to conduct banking services from anywhere at any time. For a large section of the population in India, such mobile access to money transactions can act as a way to achieve financial inclusion. The level of acceptance and use of the formal money transfer mechanisms in India is an important issue of research. The purpose of this research is to critically examine and validate the acceptance and use of technology-based mechanisms of money transactions among the migrant workers in Kerala. A primary survey was conducted using validated questionnaire requesting response for the factors obtained from literature review. The factors considered in the study are Age, State of origin, Education level, Monthly average income and Type of job. The data was collected from 200 migrant workers spread across four districts of Kerala. The findings imply that even though the migrant workers are aware and have access to various modes of money transfer, they stick on to the traditional banking processes for transferring their money. The study provides a thorough empirical insight on the acceptance of new technologies in financial transaction methods among migrant workers in Kerala. Keywords- Migrant workers, Mobile money, Banking Technology, Financial Inclusion, Money transfer.

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2016

Journal Article

Dr. Avinash Shivdas and Chandrasekhar J., “Sustainability through Frugal Innovations: An Application of Indian Spiritual Wisdom”, Prabandhan: Indian Journal of Management, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 7–23, 2016.[Abstract]


Today, the entire world is on the brink of disaster. The waves of crises like global warming, climate change, financial crisis, mental traumas, and tensions are engulfing mankind. Many business strategies are being discussed with sustainability as the watch word. In this context, the age-old Indian wisdom has much to offer. The gap between the haves and have-nots is on the rise. Affordability of many products is becoming a distant dream for the common man. To cater to the needs and wants of the contemporary world, firms have to adopt frugal innovation to produce low-cost and high-quality sustainable products/services. The aim of this paper was to create a conceptual model of understanding sustainability through frugal innovation by combining ideas from these fields and basing the model on the spiritualistic perspective of Indian wisdom. The case study methodology was adopted to substantiate the above conceptual model.

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2016

Journal Article

Dr. Saswat Barpannda and Susmita Mukhopadhyay, “Intellectual Capital Components in Indian Microfinance Sector: Scale Development and an Empirical Study”, International Journal of Learning and Intellectual Capital (IJLIC), vol. 13, pp. 338 - 360, 2016.

2016

Journal Article

Dr. Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra and Sougata Ray, “Penetration of MFIs among Indian States: An Understanding through Macro Variables”, International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 15, pp. 294 - 305, 2016.[Abstract]


Purpose
The Indian microfinance industry witnessed one of the fastest growths in the recent times. However, the striking feature of this growth is that the Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) are concentrated only in some specific regions of the country. There is a huge geographical skew in the distribution of the MFIs. In this paper, an attempt has been made to explain these geographical skew by using the macro variables of the states. The objective of the study is to identify the causes for this regional disparity in the growth of MFIs.
Design/methodology/approach
We try to explain the level of penetration of microfinance in the states by using regression models.
Findings
Our analysis suggests that state-level macro factors are significant in explaining the geographical skew. MFIs in India have concentrated in states which are richer, have good rural infrastructure, but lack in adequate banking facility, and have low human capital.
Originality/value
The study provides an insight which would help in framing the necessary regulations to ensure that MFIs operate in all regions of the country.

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2016

Journal Article

D. Sougata Ray and Sushanta Mohapatra, “Impact of Repayment Crisis on the Financial Performance of Indian Microfinance”, Institutions, Journal of small business managemnt, 2016.

2015

Journal Article

Dr. Avinash Shivdas and Soumya Sivakumar, “Innovation in Services: A lancastrian Approach to the Field of E-learning”, Education and Information Technologies, 2015.[Abstract]


Innovation in services is one of the prime drivers of several economies. There are various schools of thought that have emerged over the past few decades in this area. The present paper focuses on the evolution of the ‘synthesis’ school of thought. It contributes to literature by extending the framework proposed by Lancaster (The Journal of Political Economy, 74(2), 132–157, 1966) and other researchers by incorporating aspects of Web 2.0 technology with a specific reference to e-learning. The proposed framework is validated using case study from the field of e-learning. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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2015

Journal Article

Dr. Saswat Barpannda and Susmita Mukhopadhyay, “A New Perspective on Performance in Indian Microfinance Institutions: An Empirical Study”, International Journal of Sustainable Economies Management (IJSEM), vol. 4, pp. 1–17, 2015.[Abstract]


With the massive growth in microfinance sector, the importance of performance measurement in microfinance institutions (MFIs) has prominent during the last decade. With an objective of commitment to dual mission, the Indian MFIs witnessed a series of rise and fall and subjected to mission drift. Thus redefining the performance is the prime objective of this study. Data gathered from 252 MFIs irrespective of their legal status. Factors for performance were identified through literature and were validated empirically. This research considered both the financial and social dimensions of performance unlike the earlier studies. Financial performance is described by profit margin, return on assets and portfolio at risk whereas social performance consists four factors namely Information disclosure (INFDIS), Mission adequacy (MISADEQ) and Community participation (COMPART). This study can be a useful bench-marking tool for practitioners to monitor and improve the MFI performance. The study has unique value to microfinance literature, both from theoretical and managerial perspectives.

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2014

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Beneficiary Charges: The Cinderella of Subnational Finance”, Taxation and Development: The Weakest Link? Essays in Honor of Roy Bahl, R. Bird and J. Martinez-Vazquez (eds.), pp. 364-402, 2014.[Abstract]


The revenue objective to cover the identifiable costs (in full or partly) is important with respect to both fees and charges. All revenue sources – taxes, fees, fines and user charges – are instruments of cost recovery to meet the financial obligations of public administration and the public and private supply of public goods and services. In the case of publicly supplied local goods, such as public administration, public education, health services, street lighting and sanitation, cost recovery may not be the dominant objective. But cost recovery is tremendously significant in the case of privately supplied local public goods, such as water supply, sewerage, electricity and telephone. In recent years, user fees and charges have gained significance at the sub-national level mainly because of hard local budget constraints. Recession resulted in drastic cuts in intergovernmental transfers and reduced access to market loans. According to the 2009 International City and County Management (ICMA) State Survey in the US, for instance, 46 percent of reporting local governments increased existing fees by 23 percent and added new levies for additional funds (Ebel and Petersen, 2012). While these trends are encouraging, there is no systematic research to assess the efficacy of local government in collecting fees and user charges vis-à-vis performance of other institutional arrangements such as off- budget supply and privatization. The structure of this paper is as follows. Section 2 discusses the principles and practices of user fees and charges and their revenue potential. Section 3 analyzes factors adversely impacting the growth of beneficiary charges in local government budgets, including the centralization of revenue, intergovernmental fiscal transfers, and alternative fiscal strategies such as tax earmarking and piggybacking. Section 4 examines the trade-off between budgetary and privatization regimes of water supply and the efficacy of cost recovery policies. Section 5

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PDF iconbeneficiary-charges-cinderella-subnational-finance.pdf

2014

Journal Article

Dr. Saswat Barpannda and Susmita Mukhopadhyay, “Human Capital and Organisational Learning: A Study of Indian Microfinance Institutions”, International Journal of Management Practice, vol. 7, pp. 222-239, 2014.[Abstract]


This study analyses Human Capital (HC) management practices by identifying the various elements of HC and its relevance in the organisational learning process in the Indian Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) context. The researcher used multiple data methods, namely observation, interaction with staff and examination of organisational documents and semi–structured case study interviews. This paper explores the importance of organisational learning in Indian MFIs drawing on examples gathered from interviews mainly with some MFIs in Eastern India and presents the findings of research which emphasise the importance of HC in enhancing the learning abilities of Indian MFIs

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2014

Journal Article

Chandrasekhar J. and Dr. Avinash Shivdas, “The Yagna Spirit–new age business dynamism”, International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 34–53, 2014.[Abstract]


New paradigms of doing business are evolving as the world is struggling with a financial crisis. It has become a compelling need for business enterprises to explore innovative solutions to overcome this crisis. The voluntary organisations are establishing social businesses as corporate entities and are embracing social responsibility projects. The distance between philanthropy and business is being substantially reduced. The emerging success stories of new age business entrepreneurship reveal the insights expressed in ancient Indian literature, which has struck deep roots in Indian ethos – the Yagna Spirit, which is becoming a new age business dynamism. 1) This paper1 discusses the concept of Yagna from the entrepreneurial perspective and makes an attempt to develop the core philosophy of Yagna Entrepreneurship; 2) It elucidates the traits of Yagna Entrepreneurs and traditional business practices influenced by the spirit of Yagna in the contemporary business context.

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2014

Journal Article

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Understanding Pro-environmental Behaviours at Workplace: Proposal of a Model”, Asia-Pacific Journal of Management Research and Innovation , vol. 10, pp. 137-145, 2014.[Abstract]


Majority of the research on pro-environmental behaviours is concerned with household setting. Growing importance of pro-environmental behaviours has made it imperative to study the same in organisational settings. The purpose of the present article is to present a framework to explain pro-environmental behaviours at workplace. Authors reviewed employee-centric sustainability literature in the management discipline and pro-environmental behaviours related literature from psychology and social psychology. Based on the Value-Belief-Norm (VBN) theory, corporate environmentalism framework and literature on norm theory, a conceptual framework for explaining pro-environmental behaviours at workplace was proposed. Authors argue that individual characteristics such as values and environmental belief, and organisational environmentalism will influence the employees’ pro-environmental behaviours through personal and social norm, respectively.

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2014

Journal Article

Bhumika Gupta, Jeayaram Subramanian, Hardik Vachhrajani, and Dr. Avinash Shivdas, “Exploring the Sources of Innovation in Food Processing SMEs of Kerala”, International Journal of Social, Behavioral, Educational, Economic, Business and Industrial Engineering, vol. 8, pp. 1149 - 1153, 2014.[Abstract]


Indian food processing industry is one of the largest in the world in terms of production, consumption, exports and growth opportunities. SMEs play a crucial role within this. Large manufacturing firms largely dominate innovation studies in India. Innovation sources used by SMEs are often different from that of large firms. This paper focuses on exploring various sources of innovation adopted by food processing SMEs in Kerala, South India. Outcome suggests that SMEs use various sources like suppliers, competitors, employees, government/research institutions and customers to get new ideas.

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2013

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Political Economy of Environmental Regulation and Performance: Some Empirical Results from SIDS”, Elsevier Procedia Economics and Finance, vol. 5, pp. 532 - 541, 2013.[Abstract]


Abstract This paper empirically examines environmental regulation politics in terms of proactive lobbying at different levels of public environmental management, namely enacting legislation and implementing policies. In the proposed models, effectiveness of environmental regulation is captured by (i) level of stringency of environmental regulations, (ii) degree of enforcement, and (iii) the achievement of various environmental performance goals. Findings from cross-country regressions support the capture theory where small size and greater availability of resources render industrial groups in \{SIDS\} powerful at the legislation level. Rent-seeking behaviour of industrial lobbies appears to be channeled via corrupt practices but is constrained by high dependence of \{SIDS\} on international trade as well as improved governance measures and better rule of law. No evidence is obtained on environmental legislative damage caused by agricultural lobbies and tourism sector. At the implementation level, both industry and agriculture are found to be pro-active in terms of non- compliance to environmental legislations causing significant damage to the environment. Weak agricultural lobbies at legislative level in \{SIDS\} may be due to extensive government support programs to agriculture, which would serve to dampen or nullify any increment in cost borne by farmers arising from stringent environmental regulations. The impact of tourism lobbies on environmental performance is inconclusive. Tourism lobbies in \{SIDS\} have interest in maintaining some level of environmental quality and do not display severe adverse impacts at the implementation phase even after controlling for their interaction with institutional variables (corruption, rule of law and government effectiveness).

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2013

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Ethnic Diversity, Development and Social Policy in Small States”, UNRISD Research Paper (Geneva), vol. 2, 2013.[Abstract]


The present study critically examines social policy performance in Mauritius in terms of the quality of institutions, overall resources of the government, social welfare orientation of government budgets and ethnic balance in social policy formulation. The historical roots of colonization and political developments are analysed to assess their impacts on social policies. Part 2 of the study portrays the colonial history and politics, and part 3 describes post-independence political developments that have marked the economic and social trajectories. Part 4 depicts the social situation in terms of social indicators during different phases of development and economic transformation. Part 5 contains an assessment of the budgetary performance of social policy. Part 6 examines the institutional foundations to meet the social policy challenges. The discussion in this section is carried out in the light of the alternative strands of literature, namely participatory democracy, power of state jurisdiction and social cohesion. An analytical exercise is undertaken in part 7 to examine the welfare orientation of social policy with particular emphasis on budgetary efforts to catch up with other countries in the region. Part 8 summarizes the major findings and puts forward some guidelines for social policy reform in small states and a tentative agenda for future research directions.

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PDF iconethnic-diversity-development-and-social-policy-small-states.pdf

2013

Journal Article

Dr. Avinash Shivdas and Soumya Sivakumar, “The Economics of Frugal Innovation - A Conceptual Exploration of the Eastern Paradigm”, Southwestern Journal of Economics, vol. 10, 2013.

2013

Journal Article

Sougata Ray, “Does Service Sector Growth Explain Manufacturing Growth in India?”, IUP Journal of Applied Economics, 2013.

2012

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “Geography, Macroeconomic Vulnerability and Economic Performance”, International Journal of Development and Conflict, vol. 02, p. 1250006, 2012.[Abstract]


The objective of the paper is to empirically examine the effects of macroeconomic volatility on growth and other indicators of welfare incorporating more particularly geography produced diverse conditions that are either growth promoting or growth hampering. We extend the literature on macroeconomic volatility, growth and welfare by integrating the macroeconomics and new development economics literature on cross-country growth performance by capturing factors beyond neoclassical and new growth approaches. Empirical results confirm that growth outcomes under different geography-produced favorable and adverse conditions have the potential of minimizing and exacerbating the effects of macroeconomic variability. The significance of geography and its links with institutions is highlighted and adverse growth and welfare effects of income inequality, coastal openness and trade openness are analyzed.

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2012

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “A political cost model of fiscal federalism : some empirical results from Indian federation”, Development and Public Finance: Essays in Honour of Raja J. Chelliah, eds by D.K. Srivastava, U. Sankar, pp. 98-112, 2012.[Abstract]


The chapter extends the literature in monopoly government as an expenditure leviathan. He constructs and tests a political cost (vote losses) model of fiscal federalism by explicitly incorporating the policy maker’s choice of a structure of tax authority to expand the leviathan at the central and state levels. Given that the political cost of raising the same amount of revenue is lower at the central level but the political gain of spending this revenue is higher at the state level, state leviathans collude with the center for revenue centralization and sharing. Using income and public finance data for 17 major Indian states for the period 1975-97, He estimates both fixed effects and random effects models and tests three hypotheses. His results support the validity of the model. One of the important corollaries of the model is that the concept of expenditure stimulation of grants is less attractive. What emerges is the sub central expenditure stimulation of central budgets as retaliatory response. He concludes that decentralization of revenue bases and tax earmarking should be a key feature of the reform agenda of fiscal federalism in India.

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2012

Journal Article

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Individual and organizational drivers of employee eco-actions: A conceptual framework”, The Journal-Contemporary Management Research, 2012.

2011

Journal Article

Maheshwar Pratap and Prasad, V., “Variations in the Occupational Structure and Gender Segregation in India and the States : Analysis Based on Census of India 2001 and 2011”, International Journal of Economics & Management Sciences, vol. 6, no. 4, 2011.[Abstract]


The proportion of workers engaged in various occupations pictures the socio-economic development of a region. Occupational gender segregation is said to exist when women and men are distributed across occupations disproportionately without considering the nature of the distribution of occupations. According to the census of India, workers are distributed according to the occupation in which they are engaged into four broad categories namely, cultivators, agricultural labourer, household industrial workers and other workers. The main objective of the study is to measure the state occupational gender segregation, in this article; the occupational differentiation and segregation by sex are measured through different indices. The study showed that even though the regional distribution of occupations in the different states of India are more or less even, the occupational gender segregation exists in almost all the states in varying degrees. Throughout the states of India, male workers are more than female workers, however, the distribution of population by sex shows that almost equal proportion of both sexes are engaged in each state. Occupational gender wise integration is a sign of progress which ensures proportionate participation of women in economic activities. So, measures should be taken by the planners and policy makers to absorb more women in modern large enterprises and thereby expand economic development.

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2010

Journal Article

Shyam Nath and Deepchand, K., “Sustainable energy from renewable biological resources: Sugarcane bagasse energy cogeneration in Mauritius”, Saving Small Island Developing States, pp. 197–208, 2010.[Abstract]


A sustainable environment is a precondition for sustainable economic development. When an economy produces GDP by using energy and other inputs, the planet produces an invisible product, known as photosynthetic product of the planet (PPP) as a natural process. This PPP however contributes to the production of GDP as an invisible input. As GDP increases, there are adverse effects on the growth of PPP due to utilisation of environmental and natural resources. If degradation of the environment is not arrested and exhaustible natural resources are not conserved, the natural growth of PPP and consequently, future GDP growth will decline. In other words, the environmental cost of producing GDP will tend to increase, alongside the threats posed by global warming.

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2010

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Tax instruments for environmental management in tourist destinations”, Saving Small Island Developing States, pp. 108-122, 2010.[Abstract]


The intent of this chapter is to discuss some of the theoretical and practical issues associated with tourismtaxation and to consider in more detail an approach that relies on a tax instrument that is already used at the local level in most developed and developing countries – property taxation.We begin by briefly addressing the major issues associated with identifying and measuring the external costs associated with tourism. That is followed by a brief review of analyses of alternative revenue instruments designed to internalise those external costs. The possibility of using property taxation is then addressed followed by a short summary and conclusion.

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2009

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Policy and Non-policy Determinants of Progressivity of Block Residential Water Rates - A Case Study of Mauritius”, Applied Economics Letters , vol. 16, pp. 211-215, 2009.[Abstract]


This article presents empirical results on increasing block water rates that contradict conventional wisdom in developing countries and many developed countries. Unlike in other countries, family size in Mauritius increases with income. Due to this unusual demographic dimension, increasing block tariffs coupled with lifeline rates that are below long-run marginal cost applicable to low-volume users produce a different result. Regional variations in water demand and extensive metering both in rural and urban areas reinforce the redistributing nature of water charges. Traditional incidence analysis with adjustment for family size, linear expenditure systems approach and interactive demand models empirically support this result

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2009

Journal Article

Shyam Nath and Sobhee, S. K., “Rational partition preferences and the equivalence of flypaper and fungibility of foreign aid: An application of Young’s Theorem”, Asian Economic Review , vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 403-410, 2009.[Abstract]


This paper discusses the political economy implications of external financial assistance in the presence of partisanship in parties. In fact, rational partisan theory posits that parties tend to adapt to the median voter’s alteration in preferences during a given incumbency period so that they could maximize their chances of being re-elected. Our paper specifically tends to illustrate whether parties should be concerned with
flypaper and fungibility of foreign aid while adapting to the dynamic preferences of voters. The Young theorem is used to show under what conditions would flypaper and fungibility have equivalent effects on output.

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2008

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo and Shyam Nath, “A shared growth story of economic success: The Case of Mauritius”, The Political Economy of African Economic Growth, 1960-2000: Country Case Studies, edited by B. Ndulu, S. O’ Connell, J. Azam, R. Bates, A.K. Fosu, I. W. Gunning and D. Njinkeu , vol. 2, pp. 369-400, 2008.

2007

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo and NATH, S. H. Y. A. M., “Weak Agriculture-industry Linkages, International Political Economy and Labour Market Distortions: A Case study of Mauritius”, International Journal of Economic Research , vol. 4, pp. 179-199, 2007.

2007

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo, “International Trends in Water Utility Regimes”, Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, vol. 78, pp. 87–135, 2007.[Abstract]


This paper provides the taxonomy of country experiences in managing their water utilities. Institutions for water supply for various uses and their financial implications are analysed. Different episodes of governmental intervention in water supply and charging are examined. From the survey of different regimes and the existing literature, cost recovery and affordability emerge as the major building blocks for any reform of water utilities. Privatization of water services in terms of ownership change, public-private arrangements and international involvement seems to be a mixed blessing and donor assistance to water projects raises issues in international inequality and does not increase cost recovery levels. Cost recovery is positively associated with economic development, institutional quality and performance of water utilities.

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2007

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Modeling the economic efficiency of irrigation water supply in dry and humid regions”, Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, vol. 19, pp. 103–122, 2007.[Abstract]


This paper tests the economic efficiency of irrigation water as supplied by single purpose and by general purpose public utilities in dry and humid regions, respectively, in terms of underprovision and overprovision. The proposed methodology mixes conceptual frameworks developed by Farrell (1957) and Brueckner (1979, 1982). A typical agricultural production function uses the institutional attributes of the water-providing authority as an argument. Both short-run and long-run estimates are provided. Although in both cases irrigation water is heavily subsidized, there is no evidence of systematic underprovision or overprovision for the dry north and west, under the single purpose Irrigation Authority. However, water is oversupplied to more humid areas by the general purpose Central Water Authority. Empirical estimates confirm that the efficiency of the single purpose Irrigation Authority cannot be attributed to irrigation technique. The general purpose Water Authority suffers from inefficiency in coordinating rainwater availability with the institutional water supply.

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2006

Journal Article

P. Gangopadhyay and Shyam Nath, “Globalization, sub-national governments and urban crises in the developing world”, Globalisation and the Third World (eds.) B N Ghosh and H M Guven, pp. 68-84, 2006.

2004

Journal Article

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Political Economy of Water Pricing Policy: Empirical Evidence from Public Utilities in Mauritius”, Water Resources Research, vol. 40, 2004.[Abstract]


This paper examines whether political economy considerations are important in the formulation of water pricing policy in Mauritius. Empirical models are developed incorporating current and lagged electoral years as dummy variables in order to test whether politicians make strategic use of water pricing policy to further their partisan electoral objectives. Political economy concerns are also included into our analysis by looking at the impact of lobby groups on the implementation of water prices. In the case of potable water prices, a disaggregated analysis according to consumer categories provides weak evidence of political manipulation. However, political manipulation is established in terms of subsidy allocations to the residential sector, which is the largest consumer category. As regards irrigation water, the results lend support to the contention that political parties indeed manipulate irrigation subsidies allocated to the Irrigation Authority. Evidence on the lobby effect emerges from our empirical analysis on potable water. More specifically, we find that smaller groups have successfully been able to use their political influence to obtain smaller water price increases.

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2001

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Government expenditure and economic development”, The Mauritian Economy: A Reader (Eds. R. Dabee and D. Greenaway), 2001.

1998

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Environmental Resources, International Tourism and Taxation - The case of Mauritius”, Mauritius Research Journal , vol. 1, 1998.

1997

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Industrialization and Labor Market Trends in Newly Emerging Economies: A Case Study of Mauritius”, Malaysian Journal of Tropical Geography , vol. 28, no. 2, 1997.

1995

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “India: Tax Experiments and the Motor Vehicles Trade”, Bulletin for International Fiscal Documentation, vol. 49, no. 12, pp. 577–582, 1995.

1989

Journal Article

Shyam Nath and Sen, T. Kumar, “Business Property Tax as an Alternative to Octroi”, Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 24, pp. 473–478, 1989.[Abstract]


One of the recent developments in the area of revenue of local governments is that octroi is on its way out. A vigorous drive is on to locate a new tax to compensate the urban local bodies for the loss of octroi revenue. Tax supplements to sales tax in the form of entry tax and surcharge/additional sales tax have been employed as a substitute measure to restore local fiscal balance in the absence of octroi. These present study evaluates these tax supplements in-terms of their impact on resource allocation, equity and local fiscal autonomy. Surcharge/additional sales tax has been argued to be better than entry tax. However these taxes being state levies are found to be contradictory to the objective of local fiscal autonomy.

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1986

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Financing of urban public services: property tax vs. user charges”, Financing Urban Development in India, pp. 227-242, 1986.

1986

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Urbanisation, growing fiscal responsibilities and property tax in Delhi metropolitan”, 1986.

1983

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Property tax potential in the major municipal corporations”, Economic Policy Review, 1983.

1980

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Incidence of Indirect Taxation in Rajasthan”, Journal of Applied Economic Research , vol. 20, pp. 60-79, 1980.

1977

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Level, growth and composition of the tax system in Rajasthan”, Rajasthan Economic Journal, vol. 1, 1977.

1974

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “A note on Professor Musgrave’s diagrammatic explanation of tax liabilities under various sacrifice formulae”, Artha Vijnana: A Journal of Politics and Economics, vol. 16 , 1974.

1974

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Indexing income tax for inflation”, Economic Affairs (September Issue), 1974.[Abstract]


Doring the period of rising prioeB, income tax paJers are put to a higher tax burden owing to interaction of loBation and a progressive tax schedule. On 'he one hand, the increase in income (money or real) puahee a portion of the income into the higher income brackets aubjeo$ to higher marginal tax ra'-, on the other, the rise in price leads to eroaion in purchasing power. If the price level is relatively atable, increase in money income and subeequent increase in tax liability may be juetified on the groUDd of increased ability to pay. But during the rleiog prioea, the riBe in tax burden may or may not be in oonformi$y with 'be rille in real inoome creating $hereby p088ibi·litlee of injllBtioe in taxauon.

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1973

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Comparison of state’s tax ratio, marginal tax rate and income elasticity of taxation”, Economic Affairs(April Issue), 1973.[Abstract]


Planned developmental elfort n-itatee enhancing the magnitude of financial re110uroe~~. During the pro- of development, both level· and compoeition of tax revenue undergo coneldtrable change. The p~nt paper propoeea to dillcuu trende in . taxation during the lut decade io fourteen Btatee of Indian Union, mainly · in tenu · of the ' . Level· of tuatlon.1 Tax ratio (T{Y), marginal tax rate (M&T) and the income eluticlty of U.x revenue (E) have been uaed ae indicators of Ute level of tuation

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1972

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “On mopping the agricultural surplus”, Economic Affairs, Annual Number, 1972.

1972

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Taxation of agriculture in India”, Southern Economist, 1972.[Abstract]


Agricultural land taxes can be an important source of deve. Jopmflnt finance in underdeveloped countries. In developing countriee adequate taxation of the furroing sector is more important than it Ia in advanced countries, sinca it has a special contribution to make to the emooth proceee of development. In underdeveloped countries the agricultural &ector is the largest sector of the economy and contribu&ee about 80 .per cent of the national product. If this eector remain& untaxed or lightly taxed, either the burden of taxation will be ehifted to other aeotore or the econom.ic growth may elow down for lack of adequate finance. Again, iD each countriea the agricultural sector baa pined much aa compared to other eectors. If thie aeotor is undertaxed the gains will be enh&nced at the coat of other aectore. For example, In India &!though the income of the agricultur&l aeotor inoreaeed, on an averege, by 11 per cent & year between 1950 and 1970 and ~he prfcee of farm products went up by 48 per cent during the Third Plan period againat the 25 per cent gain registered by lnd118trial products, bardlv any elfort baa been made to mop up the additiouaJ gains of the former. As a consequence, the burden of taxation baR been ahifted to non-agricultural aector.

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1972

Journal Article

Shyam Nath, “Land revenue: Alternative to farm income tax”, Capital, 1972.

Publication Type: Conference Proceedings

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2018

Conference Proceedings

Remya Vivek Menon and Soni Vivek, “Social Media Strategies to Promote Energy Conservation in Gen y-A Conceptual Model”, Proceedings of 2017 IEEE International Conference on Technological Advancements in Power and Energy: Exploring Energy Solutions for an Intelligent Power Grid, TAP Energy 2017. IEEE, Kollam, India, pp. 1-6, 2018.[Abstract]


Energy conservation is the talk of the town and environment conscious organizations, government; companies are looking for multiple ways to enhance the awareness among householders, youngsters and corporates. The most prominent strategy adopted is through spreading the campaigns in social media. Social media platforms provide an economical, dependable and well-timed mechanism for sharing information. Adoption of the smart phone, government policies, and the user friendly applications has made social media usage ubiquitous and faster. The current literature shows deficiency of social media strategies in the online platform for better promotion of energy conservation. This study focuses on developing a conceptual model for promoting conscious energy conservation behaviour in Gen Y using the best social media strategies.

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2017

Conference Proceedings

Anitha Kaveri, Dr. Sangeetha G, Dr. Deepak Gupta, and Maheshwar Pratap, “Decoding Engagement in MOOCs: An Indian Learner Perspective”, Proceedings - IEEE 8th International Conference on Technology for Education, T4E 2016. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 100-105, 2017.[Abstract]


Building on existing works that hold 'learner engagement' central to learning, this paper seeks to decode the constituents of student engagement in MOOC learning. Specifically we model the impact of preference for learning styles and the different motivations to learn on learner engagement in MOOCs. We propose that an inclination to learn new things, lifelong learning attributes and paying for a course will positively impact engagement. Treating learner engagement in MOOCs as a 'latent construct', we employ a Structural Equation Model (SEM) on a dataset of Indian MOOC learners to test our hypothesis. Our analysis shows that learners who indicate love for learning as a reason for learning are more engaged in MOOCs. The results also indicate that those learners who are comfortable with learning and understanding new things are more engaged in MOOCs. Learners who prefer learning by themselves show lesser engagement in MOOC learning. We have argued in this paper that the current discussion on learning outcomes in MOOCs is unidimensional in its focus on MOOC success as a 0-1 activity centered on completion. Learning is a multi-dimensional activity and in order to take our current understanding of MOOCs forward, it is important to consider broader aspects of learning and its outcomes. Measuring engagement and the factors that lead to engagement were a first step towards a developing a more holistic understanding of MOOC based learning. The results from this study - one of the first to focus on learner engagement in MOOCs - are encouraging as it proposes an alternate way to look at success in MOOCs. © 2016 IEEE.

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2017

Conference Proceedings

Maheshwar Pratap, Dr. Sangeetha G, Dr. Deepak Gupta, and Anitha Kaveri, “Employment Guarantee Scheme through the Lens of Financial Inclusion”, 2017 International Conference on Data Management, Analytics and Innovation, ICDMAI 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 230-235, 2017.[Abstract]


Financial Inclusion is one of the stated objectives of National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA) - world's largest Employment Guarantee Scheme. Even though financial inclusion efforts began in India in 2005, large sections of rural India still remain financially excluded. At the time of this work, possessing a bank/ post office account has not been mandated by the Government of India for gaining NREGA employment - our work, therefore focuses on the role of access to formal banking on the breadth and depth of participation in Employment Guarantee Schemes. We find evidences of positive impact of access to formal banking on demand for NREGA jobs as well as extent of participation. We also find interesting contrasts between individual and joint bank account holders in demand for labor as well as participation.

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2017

Conference Proceedings

V. Mohan, Garcia, V. C., Frey, M. L. M., Dr. Maneesha V. Ramesh, Arya Devi R. D., Sai Shibu N. B., R. Mohan, and Manoj P., “Assessing Village Power Grid Problems for Development of Quality and Stable Supplemental Sustainable Energy”, 2017 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC). pp. 1-10, 2017.[Abstract]


The UN Millennium Development Goals have in recent years understood and emphasized the critical connection between rural poverty and health issues, and lack of any or proper electrification. Although Indian village electrification has been a priority for the government for a number of years, it is a huge task given the millions of households residing in rural areas. Further, not all claims of village electrification reflect actual access to the grid nor consistent quality of access, when available. This paper addresses an assessment of electrification challenges in villages, as well as potential renewable resource availability. In response to electrification concerns expressed by villagers in the state of Jharkhand, a functional assessment of the existing grid was conducted, as well as an assessment of personal, business, and community electrification needs expressed by villagers. Multiple problems were discovered and are reported here. With village participation, alternative sustainable energy sources were explored, and the most feasible alternative sources to meet village needs for sustainable, reliable energy supplementing the current grid were identified. This paper also presents a detailed needs-assessment of villagers which will influence the potential sustainable energy solution.

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2017

Conference Proceedings

Soni Vivek, “Spirituality and Employee Attitude - A Relationship Perspective”, 2017 International Conference on Data Management, Analytics and Innovation, ICDMAI 2017, 8073518. IEEE, Pune, India, pp. 246-248, 2017.[Abstract]


Spirituality and workplace Attitude of Employees have an important relationship; it differs when the person changes. It is quite difficult to compare both Attitude and Spirituality. The study assesses the reliability and validity of the measures used and it certainly discusses the results that came out from the analysis which says whether workplace Attitude has a Positive or Negative impact on Spirituality. For an Employee he interacts more time in his Work Environment may be 3/4 of his day. So the study helps to come out with a result that shows whether they are able to manage their stress or pressure with the help of spirituality. Now a day's employees are suffering a lot of stress and pressure from their organization to complete their work before the deadlines given and to achieve their target. So this research paper mainly focuses on one aspect that is, does Spirituality plays a significant role in employee's workplace attitude. This paper looks in to the factors that support spirituality deals within the traditional understanding in employing workplace spirituality and also the connection between spirituality and individual and organizational results. This study was mainly conducted to check whether the spiritual factors have any influence on attitude of an employee in his work place, so the study considered 10 factors, which is related to spirituality. The results show the attitude is related to the spirituality in an organization, there is a positive impact between them.

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2016

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture, Sumathi G. N., and Geevarghese, “Work and Non-Work Interference an Enhancement of Public sector employees: Role of perceived organizational support and human resource practices.”, 7th International Conference on Excellence in Research & Education. IIM Indore, Indore, 2016.

2016

Conference Proceedings

Anitha Kaveri, Dr. Deepak Gupta, Dr. Sangeetha G, and Maheshwar Pratap, “Convergence or Divergence: MOOCs and Legacy of Higher Education Outcomes”, Proceedings - 2016 IEEE 4th International Conference on MOOCs, Innovation and Technology in Education, MITE 2016. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 20-24, 2016.[Abstract]


Massive Open Online Courses have been deemedboth as a disruption as well as the biggest experiment of ourtimes in higher education. Higher Education Institutions (HEIs)are facing a lot of heat owing to competition and rising costs. This work looks at Massive Open Online courses through the lensof Higher Education and its expected outcomes. Using acomparative framework, we map the expected outcomes of highereducation against popular global MOOCs and the recentlylaunched Indian version - SWAYAM to evolve the strengths andweaknesses inherent to both modes. Global MOOC platformsscore highest on student centric parameters including learningdesign, opportunities for lifelong learning, better accessibility. The strength of SWAYAM lies in its qualitative evaluation systemsas well as recognition of credits, equity of access andaffordability. Traditional HEIs have a clear edge over globalMOOCs and SWAYAM in terms of long term impact on citizenand society building and shaping individual opinions.

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2015

Conference Proceedings

Anitha Kaveri, Dr. Sangeetha G, Dr. Deepak Gupta, and Maheshwar Pratap, “Decoding the Indian MOOC learner”, Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE 3rd International Conference on MOOCs, Innovation and Technology in Education, MITE 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 182-187, 2015.[Abstract]


Massive Open Online Courses have been looked at both as disruptive innovation as well as the biggest experiment in education in recent times. 15 Million learners have turned to MOOCs as in 2014 and Indians constitute the second largest share of the MOOC user base. This paper attempts to understand some of the essential characteristics that distinguish a MOOC user from a non-user in India. A proprietary survey for understanding MOOC consumers has been used to draw insights on demographics of potential MOOC users including age, occupation, gender, educational backgrounds as well as some salient aspects of their personality, learning styles and life goals. Three logistic regression models have been tested. The first model investigates the impact of background demographic variables and internet skills of respondents on the choice to enroll in at least one MOOC course. The second model includes key personality traits that are hypothesized to influence the user adoption of MOOCs and the full modeladdsvariables pertaining to learning styles, learning environment and life goals. Those with better internet skills and an existing preference for learning through videos were seen to be significantly more likely to adopt MOOCs. Personality traits aligned with an openness to try new things were seen to influence the adoption decision but the learning styles and learning environment did not differentiate users from non-users. The results also indicate a significant influence of gender and age. © 2015 IEEE.

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2014

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Normative beliefs and workplace pro-environmental behaviour: Does the source of belief matter?”, The 2nd Biennial Conference on Sustainable Business, Energy and Development in Asia. Hiroshima (Japan), 2014.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture, G. N. Sumathi, and Geevarghese, “Impact of human resource practices and supervisor support on perceived organizational support among public sector employees.”, Conference on Global Strategies for an Emergent India . IIM Kozhikode and University of Sydney, Kozhikode,December , 2012.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Geevarghese, Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture, and S. Manivel, “Effect of age and length of service on employees organizational identification and intention to stay- A study of a large public sector undertaking.”, Conference on Global Strategies for an Emergent India . IIM Kozhikode and University of Sydney, Kozhikode, 2012.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Effect of health consciousness and material values on environmental belief and pro-environmental behaviours”, 2nd International Conference on Strategy Management and Research. Singapur, 2012.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Understanding Employee Eco-actions: Interviews with Managers”, XXII Annual Convention of the National Academy of Psychology (NAoP) India. Bangalore, 2012.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture, Geevarghese, and G. N. Sumathi, “Effect of Manager’s Motivation on Organizational Effectiveness”, International Conference on Synchronizing Management Theories and Business Practices . Annamalai University and Putra Intelek, Malaysia, 2012.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture, R. K. Pradhan, and Geevarghese, “Effect of organizational climate on organizational effectiveness”, 47th National and 16th International conference of Indian Academy of Applied Psychology. Cochin, 2012.

2012

Conference Proceedings

Dr. Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M. P. Ganesh, “Individual and organizational drivers of employee eco-actions: A conceptual framework 2012”, Athenaeum 2012, VI International Conference on Management Research. Tiruchirapalli, 2012.

Publication Type: Book Chapter

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2011

Book Chapter

V. Hardik B and Sougata Ray, “Economics of Scale in Microfinance Institutions: Evidences from India”, in Role of Banking in Rural Economic Development, 2011, pp. 62-68.

2010

Book Chapter

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Valuation of Non-market Environmental Goods and Services”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 32–47.[Abstract]


Environmental goods and services are shown as amenities having impact on an individual’s welfare. Some are goods and services in the traditional economic sense, for instance, food, timber, recreation, materials and technology. Such goods and services enter the market place where demand and supply forces determine their price. Markets can be local, national and international.When environmental goods and services are traded, their valuation is done in international prices using the exchange rate of countries involved. Valuation of marketed goods is less complicated because markets reveal information about supply of, and demand for, these goods and services.

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2010

Book Chapter

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Impact Assessment and Biodiversity Conservation: An Application of EIA and SEA”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 48–58.[Abstract]


One of the objectives underlying the valuation of environmental goods and services (which do not enter the market place) is to highlight their significance in economic and social terms. Moreover, such information is used to estimate the potential loss of these resources if conservation attempts are lacking. It has been discussed in the earlier chapter that putting a number on environmental resources is a stupendous task. For example, evaluation of damages to biodiversity is not only extremely difficult, but it would also lack scientific precision. Environmental impact assessment techniques are employed to directly assess damage to the natural, economic and social environment due to developmental proposals. They are intended as instruments of preventive environmental management. Biodiversity conservation initiatives internationally advocate the extensive use of environmental impact assessments to design effective strategies and plans.

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2010

Book Chapter

Yeti N. Madhoo, “Environmental Policy Instruments and Governance”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 59–71.[Abstract]


The major justification for environmental regulation stems from the public interest theory where environmental policy aims at promoting societal welfare by addressing various sources of market failure. For example, regulatory measures can be used to curb negative externalities like pollution or to control overuse of environmental resources having public goods or open access characteristics (see Chapter 1 for an excellent discussion of these issues). We begin with an overview of the various classes of environmental policy instruments.Next, criteria for choice between these instruments are discussed. The fourth section reviews practical considerations for effective implementation of environmental policies. More specifically,we seek to probe into causes of policy failure which is characteristic of developing countries and therefore a cause of concern for their sustainable development.This part of the discussion takes us to another strand of the economic literature which emanates from the ‘public choice’ school of thought. In essence, the conflicting interests and rent-seeking behavior of agents emerge as important constraints of environmental policy-making and implementation. The final section summaries the main issues.

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2010

Book Chapter

Yeti N. Madhoo, “An Illustration of the Tragedy of the Commons: The Demise of the Aral Sea”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, Commonwealth Secretariat, UK, 2010, pp. 133–144.[Abstract]


The source of many environmental and natural resource problems lies in ill-defined property rights. In this chapter, we explain how the tragedy of the commons can result from existing types of ownership/property rights regimes and examine the consequences. The implications for policy-making are also briefly discussed. The dire consequences of the tragedy are illustrated by the case of the Aral Sea.

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2010

Book Chapter

Shyam Nath, “Concepts and public policy issues in environmental and natural resource analysis”, in Saving Small Island Developing States, London (UK): Commonwealth Secretariat, 2010, pp. 19–31.[Abstract]


This chapter introduces the relevant concepts in environmental and natural resource analysis and brings out why there is a need for governmental regulation and policy for environmental management. Classification and definitions of environmental goods and services are presented in the second section. In the third and fourth sections, an attempt is made to discuss environmental goods as a necessity or an amenity and as public goods and to examine the major characteristics of these goods. In the fifth section, policy context is examined. Given the public goods nature of environmental resources, the importance of conscious policy on use and conservation is highlighted. Concluding remarks are contained in the last section.

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Publication Type: Presentation

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2011

Presentation

V. Hardik B. and Sougata Ray, “Economics of Scale in Microfinance Institutions: Evidences from India”, National Level Seminar on "Role of Banking Sector in Rural Economic Development. Dr. N.G.P. Arts and Science College, Coimbatore, sponsored by Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR), 2011.

Publication Type: Book

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

2010

Book

Shyam Nath, John L. Robert, and Yeti N. Madhoo, Saving Small Island Developing States: Environmental and Natural Resource Challenges. Commonwealth Secretariat, 2010.[Abstract]


Small may be beautiful, but small island states have a big problem - the environmental consequences of climate change. Emanating from research at the University of Mauritius and with contributions from a wide range of experts,&nbsp;<em>Saving Small Island States</em>&nbsp;introduces and explains the key environmental policy challenges and suggested responses to them.

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1994

Book

Shyam Nath and Purohit, B. C., Management of Urban Local Finances. New Delhi: R. Publications, 1994.

Publication Type: Newspaper Article

Year of Publication Publication Type Title

1987

Newspaper Article

Shyam Nath, “Replacing Octroi: A look at alternatives”, Economic Times, December 10, 1987.

1975

Newspaper Article

Shyam Nath, “Predictability of state taxes”, Economic Times, September 9 , 1975.